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text 2017-05-01 03:11
Revised Turn 8 with Bonus Rolls

My original roll was

 

  Age of Myth: Book One of The Legends of the First Empire - Michael J. Sullivan  (432 pages)

Although anything by Adrian Tchaikovsky would also have fit...

 

My first bonus roll

  Neverwhere: Author's Preferred Text - Neil Gaiman (215 pages)

Now, I was at 36% in Neverwhere when I rolled it, so based on the hardcover pagecount of 336, the remainder of the book will count as 215 pages. It's just so perfect for this square and I need to finish it by tomorrow. Eep. I'd better stop posting and start cracking...

 

But first things first, my second bonus roll:

  The Butterfly Garden - Dot Hutchison (276 pages)

Since the start is a free space and you can read any book.

 

Finally, my third bonus roll:

 

Hogfather (Discworld, #20) - Terry Pratchett (445 pages) The Once and Future King - T.H. White,Neville Jason (692-864 pages/33 hrs)

 

I was originally thinking that Hogfather would be perfect since it's the next book in my Discworld reread and there's the talking raven but then I remember that I had The Once and Future King on audio and I think it fits the "Classic" Fantasy published before 2000 part. It's super long though (33 hours), so I'm not sure I want to use it to be able to roll again a couple days early. Any thoughts?

 

Anyway, we'll see if I manage to roll again before the end of the week. That's a lot of reading lined up, and I didn't do that much of it this weekend.

 

I forgot to add my board:

 

Also edited for sense. Perhaps I should sleep soon.

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photo 2017-05-01 02:11
The Devil's Star - Jo Nesbø
Hector and the Search for Happiness - François Lelord
The Leopard: A Harry Hole thriller (Oslo Sequence 6) - Don Bartlett,Jo Nesbø
Booklikes-opoly
1st roll : ?8
2nd roll - Main street 14

Started on 15 April already. So I am a few days late. 


See details here. 

 

http://blog.booklikes.com/post/1552561/wanna-plan-a-game-it-s-booklikes-opoly-created-by-moonlight-reader-obsidian-blue  

 

Rolled dice 1st on 17 April and got 8 .  

So a mystery novel. Started with Jo Nesbo "The Devil's Stars" 

 

Collected $20 at Start. 

 

See how it goes. 

 

Update: 24 April.  Finished reading The Devil's Star. 522 pages. Collected $5.

 

New Total = $25

 

2nd roll dice of 7.

 

 

Get me to Main Street 14. Read a book that involves oversea travel or has a suitcase on the cover. 

 

Hector and the Search for Happiness 192 pages. 

 

30 April 2017. Read the book. Collected $2. 

 

New Total = $27. 

 

3rd roll of dice. A 10. 

 

Landed me at Water Works. "Read a book with water on the cover, or where someone turns on the waterworks (i.e., cries) because of an emotional event." 

 

 

 

Rain is water. Picked "The Leopard" by Jo Nesbo. 740 pages. 

 

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text 2017-04-30 20:48
Booklikes-opoly Readathon Extra Rolls - Final books
The Thin Man - Dashiell Hammett
Poirot Investigates - Agatha Christie
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee

I had to think over some of the books for the three extra dice rolls, but with the help of BrokenTune I managed to choose a book for all the squares:

 

Frontierland 1: The Thin Man by Dashiel Hammett. I´m not completely satisfied with this choice for this square (because it´s not a western), but I really want to read this book and the title starts with a t. 

 

Frontierland 4: Poirot Investigates by Agatha Christie. I have such a huge stack of Christie´s at home, I really need to read more of her books.

 

Main Street 10: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. BrokenTune recommended this book to me and it´s been on my to-read list for ages. And it´s about time that I read it.

 

 

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review 2017-04-30 20:29
Against the Paw by Diane Kelly
Against the Paw - Diane Kelly

This was an impulse buy. I saw it at the grocery store and was immediately drawn in by the dog on the cover. Even though I knew it wasn’t the first book in the series, it sounded like something a newbie should be able to jump into fairly easily.

Against the Paw is set in Fort Worth, Texas and stars police officer Megan Luz. Megan used to be partnered with Derek Mackey until he made one crude and sexist comment too many and she tased him. Megan was assigned a K-9 partner named Brigit, and Derek’s job was saved by his friendship with the chief of police. In this entry in the series, Megan and Brigit are investigating reports of a peeping tom at Berkeley Place. There’s a possibility these incidents may be connected to Ralph Hurley, a parolee who recently cut off his ankle monitor.

My latest Booklikes-opoly game roll asked that I read something tagged as a “cozy mystery” on Goodreads or elsewhere. Soon after I started reading, I double-checked that this was indeed marketed as a cozy mystery (Amazon lists it as such), because it had a few features that made me skeptical.

The big one was that one of the book’s three POVs was the peeping tom. I couldn’t recall if I’d ever read a cozy mystery that included the villain’s POV, and I found it to be an unpleasant surprise here (there are things I’m okay with in other mysteries or thrillers that I don’t particularly expect or want in cozy mysteries). Thankfully, for the most part it wasn’t quite as bad as I feared. The peeping tom’s efforts often went awry in some way. Unfortunately, there were a few more distasteful scenes later in the book - for example, one in which the peeping tom spied on a hijabi and got off on seeing her brush her hair, and one in which the peeping tom spied on a woman having sex.

The book’s other two POVs were Megan (first person POV) and Brigit (third person POV). The Brigit POV parts tended to be on the cutesy side but were usually too brief to be annoying, only a page or two long. They were kind of pointless, though. There were only a couple times when Brigit’s POV contributed a little extra information, and it was never anything that wasn’t covered by another POV later in the book. I suppose Brigit’s POV added a bit of extra humor to the book, but I only really laughed at one part.

Megan’s POV wasn’t bad, but she had some blind spots that bugged me. Some examples:

“Anyone who’d served his or her country couldn’t be all bad, right?” (95)

“[Derek Mackey] and Garrett Hawke were cut from the same cloth. Arrogant. Unreasonable. Uncompromising. Still, they worked to protect others. I had to give them that, even if I thought their reasons were less about concern for others and more about basking in hero worship.” (136)

Megan seemed to be prone to the belief that cops and soldiers were unlikely (or less likely?) to be bad people, even if she had evidence to the contrary. Sure, Derek Mackey was a disgusting sexist pig who apparently couldn’t go more than a few minutes without saying something horrible, but hey, he was also a brave cop. Personally, I couldn’t help but shudder at the thought of how Derek probably handled rape victims (female or male) or, hell, female victims in general.

I did really like the partnership between Megan and Brigit, and the parts that dealt with Megan’s efforts to understand what Brigit was telling her were really interesting. There were a couple times when Brigit correctly identified the peeping tom and Megan misinterpreted her actions, but Megan did eventually catch on.

The characters were okay. In addition to Megan and Brigit, there was Seth, Megan’s boyfriend (still working through some personal issues involving his mother), and Frankie, Megan’s friend and roommate. I could tell I’d missed out on some relationship info by starting this series with the fifth book, but the author provided enough background that I didn’t feel lost.

I don’t feel particularly inclined to hunt down the rest of the series, but this was an okay read overall.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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text 2017-04-30 19:51
Reading progress update: I've read 10 out of 372 pages.
Neverwhere - Neil Gaiman

Gradually he realized that the Tube map was a handy fiction that made life easier but bore no resemblance to the reality of the shape of the city above. It was like belonging to a political party, he thought once, proudly, and then, having tried to explain the resemblance between the Tube map and politics, at a party, to a cluster of bewildered strangers, he had decided in the future to leave political comment to others.

 

Living in a city with a subway, I know IT IS much like that, lol. I did not expect this to fit the Monorail square this neatly too.

 

He continued, slowly, by a process of osmosis and white knowledge (which is like white noise, only more useful), to comprehend the city, a process that accelerated when he realized that the actual City of London itself was no bigger than a square mile

 

This is really what coming to live into a big city felt like.

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