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text 2017-07-12 21:01
Exciting July Releases That Are On My TBR
A Paris All Your Own: Bestselling Women Writers on the City of Light - Eleanor Brown
A Name Unknown (Shadows Over England) - Roseanna M. White
The Diplomat's Daughter: A Novel - Karin Tanabe
Where the Light Falls: A Novel of the French Revolution - Owen Pataki,Allison Pataki
Seducing Abby Rhodes - J.D. Mason
Edward VII: The Prince of Wales and the Women He Loved - Catharine Arnold
The One I've Waited For (The Crystal Series) - Mary B. Morrison
The Cartel 7: Illuminati: Roundtable of Bosses - Ashley and JaQuavis,JaQuavis Coleman
The Truth We Bury: A Novel - Barbara Taylor Sissel

I finished only one book in June. I was quite shocked. I've started many and am hopeful that July will be a better month for reading. I've been out of sorts personally and physically. However, this list of books are right up my street and I'm sure are going to be awesome reads. I'm revisiting favorite authors and genres.

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review 2016-09-05 05:05
Conformity, Freedom and Everything Between
The Light of Paris - Eleanor Brown

Imagine how our lives would have turned out if we hadn’t been afraid. I loved Sebastian, and Henry these men both sexy, and alive with dreams and happiness. The women, three generations, all suffering from making choices based on fear and peoples judgement. Finally one of them has broken the pattern and becoming who she could be.

This a multiple generational story about love, adventure, obligations, control, sacrifice, broken dreams, conformity and finally happiness. Freedom, has it’s price, and a good life is worth it.

I struggled in the beginning, almost dropping it early on. It was depressing, with a sad character, but then it started changing. The message is good, the stories are lovely and full of lessons on living.

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text 2016-09-04 03:11
Reading progress update: I've read 40%.
The Light of Paris - Eleanor Brown

I hated it, I semi hated it, I really hated the wimpy MC, hated the abuse, loved the narrator, wanted to quit, was going to quit but...I'm addicted to the story now, and I'm not sure why. It's dull and fascinating at the same time, infuriating and heart wrenching. I don't think I like the story but I need to know what happens to them. This is way outside my type of reading. So I'll keep it going for a little while longer 

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text 2016-08-31 14:11
August wrap-up
Age of Myth: Book One of The Legends of the First Empire - Michael J. Sullivan
The Spirit Chaser - Kat Mayor,K.M. Montemayor
Mirror Image: A Novel - Michael Scott
Phantom - Susan Kay
Privateers of the Revolution: War on the New Jersey Coast, 1775-1783 - Donald Grady Shomette
The Light of Paris - Eleanor Brown

6 books finished, 5 of them NetGalley reads.

 

The best by far was the non-NetGalley book, Phantom by Susan Kay. However, The Light of Paris was also very enjoyable. The others were okay, but not exceptional.

 

No progress on samples. The death of my first Kindle has thrown my filing system off and it's going to take a while to get it all sorted out with old 'collections' syncing to new ones from the cloud and some items sitting on my computer that were never cloud based, including older samples from before they started keeping them there.

 

However, with Halloween Bingo starting tomorrow, samples won't be getting a lot of my attention. I've got planned reads pretty much decided and have even chosen which rows to start with, influenced by the fact that I have two unstarted NetGalley books that fit categories.

 

I also have two others that don't fit Bingo, and I'll need to get through those, game or no game. I won't be requesting any new ones though, unless something in the Horror section bumps one of my current selections.

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review 2016-08-09 10:34
The Light of Paris
The Light of Paris - Eleanor Brown

by Eleanor Brown

 

This is a story of two women, each of whom discover Paris in their own way. We first meet Madeleine in 1999. She is drawn to art and loves to paint, but her family circumstances place her as a corporate wife to the sort of very controlling husband who makes a woman dream of being single and free to wear what she wants, eat what she wants, and spend her time painting instead of schmoozing with the wives of business contacts with whom she has nothing in common.

 

Madeleine finds her grandmother's diary and reads about Margie in Jazz age Paris, 1916. Margie lives in a time and culture where young women debut when they reach marriageable age and expect to find a well-to-do husband and have children. But Margie is having none of it, she wants to be a writer and live a Bohemian lifestyle. Her first encounter with a man her parents approve of, what might be called a rich wastrel, gives her a push in the direction of an unconventional life ahead.

 

I was struck by the writing in this and how eloquently the personalities involved were portrayed, from Madeleine herself down to the peripheral characters. Each of them came alive in just a few paragraphs of lyrical prose and made their indelible stamp on the story.

 

Madeleine and her grandmother had much in common. Both were born into 'society' families that had expectations of how young women thought and behaved, both had artistic urges that made then want to break out of the molds created for them and both were given the chance to sample what life might be like if they rebelled against the 'expectations' thrust upon them.

 

I could appreciate how difficult it was for each of them to break loose from the training of their lives, of family expectations and all that they knew to try to enjoy something of life beyond the prescribed formula for their social strata. More interesting still was experiencing Paris through the eyes of Margie, the grandmother, and wondering if she would find a way to maintain her newly discovered freedom.

 

The book kept me interested and wanting to know the fate of each of the women and what choices they would make for their lives, given the limitations thrust upon them. The end didn't disappoint, though I would have liked to see how Madeleine fared in Paris.

 

Definitely one of my best reads this month.

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