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text 2019-02-08 11:00
Virtual Book Tour & Giveaway with Excerpt! Flygirl by R.D. Kardon!

 

http://www.rabtbooktoursandpr.com/

 

Today, I am participating in a tour for a women's fiction novel - Flygirl by R.D. Kardon! Enjoy and don't forget to enter the giveaway!

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

 

Upmarket Commercial/Women’s Fiction
Date Published:January 3, 2019

Publisher: Acorn Publishing LLC

 

Let pilot Tris Miles lift you up, and fly you to new heights with her inspiring story of love, ambition and the meaning of success.

 

R. D. Kardon's debut novel puts you in the cockpit with Tris Miles as she navigates the challenges of integrating an all-male corporate flight department in 1997. Tris encounters harassment, marginalization, and backstabbing on her journey to becoming a jet captain.

____________________________

 

It’s 1997. Women stand beside men in combat and fly fighter jets. Pilot Tris Miles is not content with her job as a First Officer for tiny Clear Sky Airlines. She wants to be a Captain—the only way she knows to prove her worth as a pilot and atone for a deadly mistake.

 

To further her career, Tris accepts a prestigious job with Tetrix, Inc. But her dream of becoming pilot-in-command twists into a nightmare.

 

As the company’s first woman pilot, she encounters resistance, marginalization and harassment on a daily basis.Fortunately Tris has one thing her co-workers can’t deny—skill.

 

When Tris finds herself in a crippled airplane thousands of miles from home she must prove she can lead. With her career on the line, can Tris earn the respect she’s been craving? And if this is the end, can she find the strength to forgive herself?

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

Goodreads - https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39725733-flygirl

 

BookBub - https://www.bookbub.com/books/flygirl-by-r-d-kardon

 

Riffle - https://www.rifflebooks.com/books/1031285

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

AVAILABLE in print or ebook


Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Flygirl-R-D-Kardon-ebook/dp/B07K1JCXS1/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1542124195&sr=8-1&keywords=flygirl+r.+d.+kardon

 

Barnes and Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/flygirl-r-d-kardon/1129802696?ean=9781947392229

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`

 

 

EXCERPT 2

 

“WELCOME TO LUXEMBOURG, Astral November Nine Tango X-ray. Runway Two- Four, cleared to land, wind two-five-zero at six knots, right turn off.” Tris acknowledged the landing clearance.


“Gear down, before landing checklist,” Deter said.


Tris grasped the handle that lowered the Astral’s landing gear. She kept her left index finger pointed at the three lights that would turn green when each of the plane’s wheels were down and locked. After a few seconds, Tris saw the left main and nose gear lights illuminate, but the right gear light remained dark.


“I do not have three green. No three green,” she said quickly. The aircraft was just six hundred feet above the ground.


“What the fuck?” Deter screamed but took no action as the Astral moved closer to the ground.

 

Deter hesitated so Tris made the call. “We don’t have three green. Go around!”

“Go around!” Deter slammed full power on the aircraft. He swore under his breath as the airplane’s nose hesitated, then pitched up.

 

Tris lifted the gear handle to stow the gear. Maybe raising it would shake something loose, and that third light would come on next time they tried to put the wheels down. But first, the Astral had to get away from other air traffic.


“Tower, Nine Tango X-ray, missed approach. We can’t con-firm that the landing gear is down and locked. We need a vector to an area where we can diagnose the problem.” Deter nodded along with her demand.


“Roger, Nine Tango X-ray, fly heading two- four-zero, climb and maintain six thousand.


Let us know what happens.”


“What is wrong with the goddamn gear? Recycle it! Now!” Deter’s words landed like blows, his anger unrestrained. Tris recovered quickly; she had to. And she couldn’t punch back. The five souls aboard the Astral were in real danger. They weren’t on the ground with options—they were in the air with none.

 


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

Five coffee mugs, three notebooks

 

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/40826401873/

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 


Robin "R.D." Kardon was a litigation attorney before beginning a twelve-year flying career as a corporate and airline pilot. She holds an Airline Transport Pilot certificate and three Captain qualifications. Her travels took her all over the world in every type of airplane from small single-engine Cessnas to the Boeing 737.

Robin earned her B.A. in Journalism and Sociology from NYU and J.D. from American University, Washington College of Law. A native New Yorker, Robin now lives in San Diego, California with her beloved rescue pets. , a work of fiction inspired by her own aviation experience, is her first novel.

 

 

 

 

Website: www.rdkardonauthor.com

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rdkardonauthor/

 

Twitter: @rdkardonauthor

 

Blog: https://www.rdkardonauthor.com/blog-1

 

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/rdk3822/flygirl-a-novel-by-rd-kardon/

 

Goodreads - https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17912002.R_D_Kardon

 

BookBub - https://www.bookbub.com/authors/5144739/record_interest

 


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 


http://www.rabtbooktoursandpr.com/

 

 

 

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review 2019-01-15 13:56
Book Blitz: Flygirl by R.D. Kardon with Giveaway

Flygirl
R.D. Kardon
Published by: Acorn Publishing
Publication date: January 3rd 2019
Genres: Adult Fiction

 

It’s 1997. Women stand beside men in combat and fly fighter jets. Pilot Tris Miles is not content with her job as a First Officer for tiny Clear Sky Airlines. She wants to be a Captain—the only way she knows to prove her worth as a pilot and atone for a deadly mistake.

 

To further her career, Tris accepts a prestigious job with Tetrix, Inc. But her dream of becoming pilot-in-command twists into a nightmare.

 

As the company’s first woman pilot, she encounters resistance, marginalization and harassment on a daily basis. Fortunately Tris has one thing her co-workers can’t deny—skill.

 

When Tris finds herself in a crippled airplane thousands of miles from home she must prove she can lead. With her career on the line, can Tris earn the respect she’s been craving? And if this is the end, can she find the strength to forgive herself?

 

Goodreads / Amazon / Barnes & Noble / iBooks / Kobo

 

 

EXCERPT

 

TRIS LOST ALL visibility as the airplane pierced a thick slab of fog. She slid her focus from the miasma outside the cockpit window to the flight instruments in front of her. They were her eyesight now. She trusted them. They told the truth.

 

She scanned the gauges and smiled. Tris heard their silent language; woman and machine entwined in the exceptional conversation of flight.

 

“Clear Sky Two-Five-One, cleared for the approach,” the Columbus, Ohio approach controller announced over a scratchy connection. Tris nodded to Captain Danny Terry, sitting two feet away in the left seat. His jaw clenched as he worked the radios on their last flight of the day.

 

“Gear down,” Tris commanded.

 

The landing gear groaned and clicked as they lowered into position. Locked on final approach, the turboprop glided toward the runway, a concrete slab somewhere below them. Its twin engines spun in sync on the airplane’s wings. Tris monitored every bump and twitch of the plane. She answered each with a tap of the controls.

 

Tris nudged the yoke to bank the airplane left, the plastic coated steering column cool beneath her hands. She thought of all the ways pilots measure movement: degrees of heading, feet of altitude, ticks of the clock. Always counting up, down, until the next critical moment. As Clear Sky 251 slid toward the ground, Tris counted down.

 

Then she saw the flash. Just for a second, an amber warning light flickered.

 

“Danny, check the gauges. We had a caution.”

 

“Five hundred,” the airplane’s synthesized altitude alert announced. Tris checked the altimeter. So close to the ground and they still had zero visibility through the late-summer glare.

 

“I don’t know,” Danny said as he scanned the gauges. “Wait. It’s the oil pressure on number one. The needle’s going crazy. It could be nothing, just a blip.”

 

Or the number one engine could be about to fail.

 

“Ok.” She’d need full power on both engines to climb if they couldn’t land—and she might not have it.

 

“Nothing in sight.” Danny squirmed forward in his seat to catch the first glimpse of runway lights. His breath grew more labored with every foot of altitude they lost. He wouldn’t see the runway until the very last second, if at all—right when Tris would decide to land the plane or thrust it back up into the soup.

 

“Roger.” Tris stayed focused and in control. As seconds passed, the plane slid lower, lower, in a stable descent. The only sounds were the whir of spinning dials, the click of needles, the white noise of flight. Tris eyed the altimeter, her hands soft but firm on the power levers.

 

Danny’s hand twitched behind hers; a backup. He strained to see the runway. Decision time loomed a few feet away.

 

The caution light blinked again. Tris had to keep her eyes on the navigation gauges. The closer the airplane got to the ground, the more sensitive those indicators became. If she strayed off course, even a little, she’d lose all guidance and have to climb, or else there was no telling where they’d hit the ground.

 

She felt Danny’s hands move closer to the controls, protecting them in case she faltered.

 

She didn’t. Tris saw the runway, dead ahead.

 

“I’ve got it,” Danny said quickly as he keyed the mike. “Columbus Tower, Clear Sky Two-Five-One, runway in sight.”

 

“Roger, Clear Sky Two-Five-One, Runway Two-Four, cleared to land, wind two-five-zero at three knots.”

 

“Landing,” Tris said. She looked outside, blinked to focus, and kept the plane moving straight along the runway centerline, edging toward the earth. The altimeter registered field elevation just as the plane’s rear wheels softly touched the ground.

 

Author Bio

 

Robin "R.D." Kardon had a twelve-year flying career as a corporate and airline pilot. She holds an Airline Transport Pilot certificate and three Captain qualifications. Her travels took her all over the world in every type of airplane from small single-engine Cessnas to the Boeing 737. Robin earned her B.A. in Journalism and Sociology from NYU and J.D. from American University, Washington College of Law. A native New Yorker, Robin now lives in San Diego, California with her beloved rescue pets.

 

"Flygirl," a work of fiction inspired by her own aviation experience, is her first novel.

 

Website / Goodreads / Facebook / Twitter

 

GIVEAWAY!

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review 2016-03-28 03:36
Review | Flygirl by Sherri L. Smith
Flygirl - Sherri L. Smith

All Ida Mae Jones wants to do is fly. Her daddy was a pilot, and years after his death she feels closest to him when she's in the air. But as a young black woman in 1940s Louisiana, she knows the sky is off limits to her, until America enters World War II, and the Army forms the WASP-Women Airforce Service Pilots. Ida has a chance to fulfill her dream if she's willing to use her light skin to pass as a white girl. She wants to fly more than anything, but Ida soon learns that denying one's self and family is a heavy burden, and ultimately it's not what you do but who you are that's most important.

Amazon.com

 

 

 

 

Ida Mae Jones grew up on a farm in Louisiana, where her father made ends meet through cultivating his own strawberry farm and doing crop dusting runs for other farmers. It was while tagging along on some of those crop dusting flights that Ida first got the desire to become a pilot herself. By the 1940s, Ida's father has passed away and World War 2 is just on the horizon. Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Ida's brother, a medical student, decides to enlist as a field medic. He knows Ida's got the itch to fly but begs her to stay home and help care for farm and family. She tries to obey her brother's wish for a time but just feels like she's sitting on her hands while the world seems to be going up in flames. Ida sneaks out to town one day to apply for a position in the WASP (Women's Airforce Service Pilots) program. Once she finds she's accepted she's got to break it to her mom. Ida's mother reluctantly gives her approval for Ida to travel to Texas to start training.

 

The big secret she's hiding from her new fellow cadets is the fact that she's black, though she believes (or at least fervently hopes) she's light enough to pass as white. Every day she fears her secret being discovered, particularly when a white male instructor takes a special interest in her. Ida also battles against prejudices that stem simply from her being a woman in a man's military. One instructor makes it his personal mission to carry out all kinds of crazy, dangerous schemes to try to get the female pilots to quit. Still, she continues to pursue her dream, inspired by her hero Bessie Coleman, the first African-American woman to earn a pilot's license. 

 

One of Ida's biggest concerns she struggles to find an answer to throughout the whole course of the novel is which way is the best way to live her life, in regards to her race. She feels that if she stays in her hometown, the best work she can hope for as a black woman in a small Southern town is being a housekeeper. Though she successfully "passed" as white and got into the WASP program, she fears that now she's locked herself into that role, never being able to come forward about her true heritage. Does she walk away from her family in order to pursue her dreams? It's terrible to think that people were, and maybe still are, forced to ask these kind of questions because of unfair, illogical, racist thinking running the world. I think one of the hardest scenes to read in this story is when Ida's mother comes to visit her at the flight school but has to pose as Ida's family maid, so as not to blow Ida's cover as a well-bred white woman. The way Ida has to address her own mother just to keep her secret safe is heartbreaking, but there's also something touching in how Ida's mother would do that for her daughter, if it meant her girl could have the best life possible. But it just hurt to read that passage, the cruelty social expectations put there.

It was also painful to read Ida's mother's speech about how she tries to do everything she can for the war effort -- use ration books, plant a victory garden, save bacon grease for the Army's munitions department -- yet the Army won't put too much effort into trying to locating her son when he goes MIA, because he's black. 

(spoiler show)

 

The first part of this novel, though good, was a little bit slow for me. It did pick up in the later chapters though, the closer the women got to completing training. I think Ida's visit with her mother at the flight school was the turning point where I felt much more invested in the characters. There's another major event later on in the story where I suspected (at the start of the novel) that something like it might be written in at some point, but actually reading it was still somehow a bit of a shock to me! It is a pivotal moment in the life of Ida and greatly influences her career decisions after that point. 

 

I liked the distinct differences in all the female pilots Ida meets and works with, and after reading Sherri Smith's Author's Note, I'm keen to pick up more books on the subject. Just some of the interesting factoids that Smith notes:

 

> WASP crews were used as test pilots on new aircraft technology during World War 2. One scene in Smith's Flygirl, describing one such test flight, was actually inspired by real life WASP Dora Dougherty Strother and Dorothea Johnson who were chosen to test the prototype of the B-26 Maurader, aka "The Widowmaker". Also tested, the behemoth B-29 whose size scared the beheebus outta many a male pilot! It was incredible (and infuriating!) to learn that the brave women of the WASP program, though definitely considered members of the military, were NOT granted full military benefits while they were enlisted. In fact, it wasn't until 1977 when the Carter administration passed the WASP Act that these women and their family members were provided with honorable discharges and / or full veteran benefits. 1977! Also, it wasn't until the 1990s that female pilots were allowed to fly combat missions. Prior to that, female pilots were stuck being glorified test pilots and supply runners, pretty much. Still important work, don't get me wrong, but I can imagine how aggravating it must have been for those pilots, given how many flight hours they put into trying to be accepted as equally skilled as any of the male pilots. 

 

>The WASP program was disbanded after World War 2. Many of the female pilots simply went back to their old lifestyles, embracing motherhood or taking up jobs as secretaries, teachers, shop clerks. Others who still had the desire to be in the air became flight instructors while yet others took up careers as Alaskan bush pilots. As far as the storyline of Smith's Flygirl, she says that she couldn't find any factual evidence of any African-American women on the rosters of the WASP program, no stories of anyone trying to pass for white ... that was solely Smith's "what if". However, she did find record of one Janet Harmon Bragg, who trained at Coffey School of Aeronautics in Chicago, who did apply for the WASP program but seemed to be turned away solely due to reasons of race. 

 

>There were two Asian women accepted into the WASP program: Hazel Ah Ying (who was later killed in action when her plane collided with another) and Maggie Gee.

 

______________________________

 

Extras 

 

* Here you can read a letter from a real life WASP who wrote to Sherri Smith after reading Flygirl

 

* If you want to learn more about the WASP program, you can visit websites Wings Across America or the website for the WASP museum.

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text 2016-03-21 01:43
Text Annotation
Flygirl - Sherri L. Smith

Citation: Smith, S. L. (2008). Flygirl. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons.

 

Annotation: Ida Mae, an eighteen-year-old light-skinned African American, passes herself off as a white woman in order to be allowed to fly as a member of the Women Airforce Service Pilots during World War II.

 

Author's Information: Sherri L. Smith has written several novels for teenagers, including LUCY THE GIANT, SPARROW and HOT, SOUR, SALTY, SWEET. In FLYGIRL, she tells a not-so-well-known side of World War II through the story of the WASP program. Ida Mae is a brave, strong character who has more at stake than other women in the WASPs, which makes this book even more powerful. Smith does an excellent job of weaving in an interesting plot along with the background history of the program. Readers will want to learn more about this subject after turning the last page of this enlightening novel.

 

Awards:

 

Levels: Grades 6-8

Genre: Young Adult Novel- Fiction

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text 2014-09-03 23:55
September #BookADayUK Day 3 - Best Home Front Novel
Rose Under Fire - Elizabeth Wein
Flygirl - Sherri L. Smith
Code Name Verity - Elizabeth Wein

I didn't quite know what to make of today's prompt, but I'm going to assume that it's a book about war and I'm going to choose some off the top of my head.  "Rose Under Fire" by Elizabeth Wein, along with its companion book "Code Name Verity," were among my favorite reads of the past year.  And Sherri L. Smith's "Flygirl" would be another I absolutely adored for the read.

 

Quick entry for today, need to get back to reading so I can submit a review tonight for Kristen Callihan's "Evernight", but I'm looking forward to tomorrow's prompt.

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