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text 2017-09-16 19:46
Zzzzzzzz...
Das Lied von Eis und Feuer 01: Die Herren von Winterfell by Martin, George R.R. (2010) Paperback - George Eliot

 

"...die scheuen Blicke" 

 

Die Scheuen Blicke, die ein sieben-jähriges Mädchen einem Jungen zuwirft und dann als fad befunden wird!! Ich finde das kann noch nicht einmal Fantasy rechtfertigen. 

Der Schreibstil ist zum Gähnen und was soll das mit den Zehntausend Personen die gleich eingeführt werden, die am Ende eh alle nur sterben werden, wenn man den Gerüchten glauben schenken darf. Und überhaupt, was ist aus den schönen Einsteckkarten in Büchern geworden, auf denen alle wichtigen Personen verzeichnet sind. Ich habe den Eindruck George R.R. Martin möchte den Russen Konkurrenz machen.

 

Ich habe das Buch auf Seite 66 entnervt zugeklappt, und die Lektüre auf unbestimmt vertagt. Vielleicht sollte ich es nochmal versuchen, wenn der Winter naht :D 

 

 

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review 2017-07-28 21:22
Middlemarch - Michel Faber,George Eliot Eliot is one of those writers who I always forget how good she is. It’s not that I ever forget she is good, it is just that forget the high standard she has for most her work. The exception is Adam Bede, and this is no doubt because it was the first Eliot I read (thanks to Alistair Cooke). I first read Middlemarch in either college or grad school. I recently re-read because of a line in the New York Times Book Review. To call Middlemarch feminist would be wrong, though in many ways it is proto=feminist. At the heart of the novel is the character of Dorothea and the idea of marriage. If Doretha was Catholic, she quite easily could have become a nun. But she isn’t, so the avenues opened to her are a bit slim. She wants to do good works, and to improve people’s lives. At beginning of the novel is she able to do this with a help of a suitor, a suitor she doesn’t know is a suitor, and later in the novel, she has the possibility to do it another way. This of course soon changes. The theme of the novel, in part, seems to be the idea of marriage for marriage does concern much of the part. At first, it is merely Doreatha’s marriage to Casaubon, who is older and who she hopes will teach almost like a father. Then it is the marriage between Lydgate, a doctor who wants to do good, and Rosamond, whose brother Fred forms part of a third marriage with Mary Garth. The question of marriage is more a question what a good marriage is. Doreatha’s first marriage, really isn’t a good one. But it is not entirely her husband’s fault and in fact, very few of her friends (in fact only her sister and James Chettam) try to talk her out of it or express doubts about the marriage. In many ways, the true right people in the novel are Mary Garth and Celia Brooke, Doretha’s younger sister. Mary is the dependable and intelligent daughter of the Gareths. She is prudent. The most imprudent thing she does is love Fred, who at the start of the book has a good heart but is a bit too much flash and imprudence. Celica is Doreatha’s younger sister, less religious, more sensual, but also more observant. She watches before she speaks. She may not be as good or holy as Doretha but she is not a bad woman. Mary too watches. This makes those two women better able to handle the society that constrains them. Doretha is not able to handle society in the same way. Her marriage options are frowned upon whether she marries for the right or wrong reason. And unlike Lydgate, who marries an illusion, a pretty thing that he does not see as human or understand fully as human. He does not watch enough. Neither does Doretha at first. Eliot’s suggestion that she is trying to write or example a modern life of St. Theresa is interesting because Dortha, like Lydgate, doesn’t quite come what she could have been. Of course, that is, in part, the purpose of Eliot’s book, showing us the bonds – both prison like and fond – that society puts on us.
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quote 2017-07-01 15:50
A friend is one to whom one may pour out the contents of one's heart, chaff and grain together, knowing that gentle hands will take and sift it, keep what is worth keeping, and with a breath of kindness, blow the rest away.

—George Eliot

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review 2017-06-10 16:50
Peasants are the real heroes...
Adam Bede - Hugh Osborne,George Eliot

That's the thing with free 'purchases' on the Kindle isn't it, one wonders 'why'? Is the offering so value-less? Even with the pedigree of George Eliot there is a temptation to look such a gift horse tentatively in the mouth. But, I needn't have worried.

 

Published in 1858, "Adam Bede" was the author's second novel and came more than a decade before "Middlemarch" (see previous review) and yet it turned out to be wonderfully self-assured. Set in Hayslope in Loamshire, which we learn is in the north midlands, the book focuses on a slice of nineteenth century pastoral life, but Eliot's examination of social divisions and connections across class, gender, generations, religion, wealth, etc has some powerful resonance with contemporary Britain. For example, preaching by Christian women (150 years later and still being debated!!); the moral conundrum of support for the poor; teenage pregnancy; gender inequality; and even the responsibility of powerful elites to wider society.

 

As the title of the book suggests, the central character is Adam Bede, who is a master carpenter and curiously in this homage to the humble working man/woman, Eliot offers a compelling antidote to the modern obsession with fame and celebrity. Indeed, the book deliberately lauds several characters of substance and I particularly liked Lisbeth Bede (Adam's doting mother), Dinah Morris (who might equally have been entitled to entitle the book, if you see what I mean) and Mrs Poyser (wife of a local farmer and a complete tartar). Each of them is made all the more praiseworthy in that they must make their respective ways without the advantages conferred by privileged upbringing. Moreover, the characters are buffeted by the twists and turns of life, but it is their capacity to 'do the right thing' in the context of their respective social codes that set them apart. What Eliot seems to be implying is that it can be very difficult to warrant the deceptively simple epithet of a 'good' man/woman and consequently they represent the best of us. Yet, they are "...reared here and there in every generation of our peasant artisans - with an inheritance of affections nurtured by a simple family life of common need and common industry, and an inheritance of of faculties trained in skilful courageous labour.....They have not had the art of getting rich, but they are men of trust, and when they die before the work is all out of them, it is as if some main screw had got loose in a machine; the master who employed them says, 'Where shall I find their like?' "

This shining of a perceptive light on the value of the industrious working class was rather more interesting to me than tiresome tales of the innately powerful and rightly elevates the author among her Victorian peers.

 

Curiously, at a couple of points in the book, Eliot affects a 'time-out' and proceeds to explain her approach to the story. "So I am content to tell my simple story, without trying to make things seem better than they were; dread nothing indeed but falsity.... Falsehood is so easy, truth so difficult."

This could be perceived as almost an apology for a tale steeped in realism, which might be deemed banal and yet, I found the book thoroughly absorbing. Rather, it was this signposting, explicitly leading the reader to understand an underlying theme and not trusting for it to be gleaned from the narrative that was interesting, but slightly odd.

 

Adam Bede is seen as quite eligible in his community and has set his cap towards local beauty Hetty Sorrel, but she in turn has come to the attention of the heir of the local squire, Captain Arthur Donnithorne. Indeed, the story deftly describes two successive love triangles, with Adam featuring in both, but these are hardly mainstays of the book. Instead, it is the strength of the 'supporting cast' that truly sets this book apart and the meshing of the various cogs in the community machine that mesmerize the reader as smoothly as the engine in a Rolls Royce Phantom. Certainly that compelling desire to know what happens, not only to Adam, but to half a dozen characters, is the hallmark of a great read. And 'love' in its many guises - romantic, familial, communal - triumphs, not in some mushy sentimental way, but as the warm oil that soothes the heat and grinding of components.

 

For me, the only grit in the Eliot machine was the language, which, true to form, was also kept 'real'. That is, the Loamshire dialect was written as pronounced,and slowed my reading until I got the hang of the rhythm. But, even that faint criticism had faded by the end and on reflection was absolutely right for the rural inhabitants and further separated the workers from their (not so much) 'betters'. I don't give out five stars lightly, but then my favourite shelf is fairly sparse too and yet I have placed Adam Bede there with little hesitation. 

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review 2017-03-01 07:32
Ein Auftakt, der neugierig macht
Das Lied von Eis und Feuer 01: Die Herren von Winterfell by Martin, George R.R. (2010) Paperback - George Eliot

Inhaltsangabe

Eddard Stark, der Herr von Winterfell, wird an den Hof seines Königs gerufen, um diesem als Berater und Vertrauter zur Seite zu stehen. Doch Intriganten, Meuchler und skrupellose Adlige scharen sich um den Thron, deren Einflüsterungen der schwache König nichts entgegenzusetzen hat. Während Eddard sich von mächtigen Feinden umringt sieht, steht sein Sohn, der zukünftige Herrscher des Nordens, einer uralten finsteren Macht gegenüber. Die Zukunft des Reiches hängt von den Herren von Winterfell ab!

 

Meine Meinung

Wie recht häufig, hänge ich bei sogenannten Hype-Büchern etwas hinterher. An diese Fantasy-Reihe bin ich eigentlich ohne Erwartungen und auch ohne jeglichen Vorinformationen herangegangen. Vor allem, weil diese Buchreihe nicht aus meinem beheimateten Genre kommt.

 

Nun zum großen Aber.

Ich habe jetzt schon die Meinung, dass George R.R. Martin hier großes erschaffen hat. Eine Reihe, die bisher 10 Bände umfasst, benötigt sehr viel Durchdenken und Beachten und ich bin in der Hinsicht wirklich gespannt, was er sich da alles zusammenfantasiert hat, so dass es irgendwann das große Ganze wird.

 

Nach dem ersten Band merkt man recht schnell, dass der erste Band im Englischen Band 1 und 2 beinhaltet. Für mich war das Ende des ersten Buches recht offen bzw. neutral. Den fiesen Cliffhanger erwarte ich erst am Ende des zweiten Teils. Natürlich verführt es die deutschen Leser schnellstmöglich mit Band 2 weiterzumachen, wozu auch ich mich zähle. Er liegt bereit.

 

Im Auftakt konnten mich zwar einige Figuren bereits neugierig machen bzw. begeistern, aber meine Highlights liegt hier tatsächlich in der Sprachgewalt des Autors und in den Beschreibungen des Settings. Mich zieht es aktuell in den Norden und hoffe, dass man Winterfell nie so ganz aus den Augen verlieren wird. Denn als nicht Seriengucker habe ich einfach gar keine Ahnung wo die Reise hingeht.

Nach Band 2 ist die erste Staffel allerdings geplant. Allerdings vermute ich, dass mein Highlight Landschaft und Umgebung in der Serie eher vernachlässigt wurde. Dies sind einfach Punkte, bei denen die eigene Fantasie durch das Lesen eines Buches immer punkten kann.

 

Einige Leser, bei denen diese Reihe nicht so gut angekommen ist, waren an eine Seifenoper erinnert. Natürlich wirkt dies aufgrund der vielen verschiedenen Familien und deren einzelnen Familienmitgliedern so, aber mir gefallen bisher diese Intrigen und Machtspiele. Als Leser fiebert man einfach die ganze Zeit der Aufdeckung entgegen. Aber dies brauch Zeit vermute ich.

Für eine Game of Thrones – Anfängerin war ich sehr dankbar über die Karten und die Namensregister im Buch. Vor allem am Anfang eine unglaubliche Hilfe, um sich erst einmal orientieren zu können.

 

Hinsichtlich der Charaktere freue ich mich sehr den weiteren Werdegang vom Bastard der Familie Winterfell zu verfolgen, ebenso wie die weiteren Geschehnisse um dessen kleine Halbschwester Arya.

Hinsichtlich des Setting freue ich mich, mich wieder in Winterfell, auf der Mauer und auf Hohenehr einzufinden. Diese Schauplätze haben es mir wirklich angetan.

____________________________________________________________

 

Mit super werde ich dieses Buch nicht bewerten, da es ein Auftakt ist und ich einfach finde, man merkt, dass hier der zweite Teil fehlt, der in der Originalversion einfach vorhanden ist.

 

Mein Fazit

Meiner Meinung nach nimmt uns der Autor in eine ganz andere Welt mit. Und welcher Leser wünscht sich so etwas nicht. Dem Alltag entfliehen und sich in den Seiten verlieren. Es ist ihm gelungen. Ich freue mich auf jeden Fall auf mehr. Schreiben kann der Mann!

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