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review 2017-04-09 00:57
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
To Kill a Mockingbird, 50th Anniversary Edition - Harper Lee

How does one review a classic when so many people have reviewed it before? This was a beautiful book, even though the unfairness depicted in it hurts.

 

My only complaint is that there was one disturbing thing that was not addressed. In the trial scene, Tom Robinson said that Mayella Ewell said she'd never kissed a grown man before and "what her pa do to her don't count." I suppose it's because the trial was for Tom Robinson, not Mr. Ewell, and in that time, most people wouldn't turn on a white man while they had a black man to browbeat, but I found the implication to be extremely disturbing and would have liked to have seen the town turn on Mr. Ewell for sexually molesting his daughter, even if they wouldn't turn on him for physically beating her or for bearing false witness against an innocent man.

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text 2017-04-04 20:56
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee

Harper Lee’s classic novel To Kill a Mockingbird is a story of distinguishing between what is morally right and wrong. The book is set during the time of the Great Depression, and it is told from the perspective of a little girl called Scout. Her father, Atticus Finch, is asked to be the attorney for an African American male who is being convicted of raping a white woman. Scout learns some of the true realities of racism throughout the course of the novel as their family receives many threats for her father representing this man. Ultimately, the moral of the story explains to all readers that we must always try to do the right thing, no matter what the outcome may be, as opposed to standing by and watching dreadful things happen to innocent people. The book’s Lexile reading level is 790L, and it is recommended to be read by students in fifth grade and up. In my classroom, I would want my students to do a scrapbook activity for this book. In each chapter, I would assign them a specific project to do. For example, students could create their own bookmark to start the book. On the bookmark, they could write character names, or draw pictures of the beginning setting. Students would complete each assignment for each chapter, and add their finished product into their scrapbook. At the end of the book reading, students would turn their scrapbooks in for a grade, but they would also present their work to the class. Each book will be unique to each individual student.

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quote 2017-01-18 09:11
“The one thing that doesn't abide by majority rule is a person's conscience.”
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee

Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

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review 2017-01-18 04:06
To Kill a Mockingbird
To Kill a Mockingbird (Perennial classics) - Harper Lee

Life in the 30s in the South. The "good ole days". Yeah, riiiight.

 

Actually, narrating this from Scout's POV allows for a lot of innocence of childhood to shine through, and it's optimistic even Scout is making scathing observations and comments on the hypocrisies and bigotry of the times.

 

I originally read this in high school, like I'm sure a lot of people did, and while it made an impact then, I had largely forgotten a lot about the story aside from Boo Radley and the trial. So I was surprised by how little those actually came into the story, which mostly chronicles Scout and Jem's childhood and summers for the two years leading up to that fateful day in 1935 when Tom Robinson was put on trial. There was never a doubt what the outcome would be, but seeing Jem's hope and absolute certainty, Dill's anger at the injustice of the cross-examination and Scout's struggles to understand what all these big events around her meant in the larger picture gave it a focal point to highlight how not innocent these so-called "simpler and easier" times actually were.

 

I was much more uncomfortable with the casual racism on display by our protags than I was by the outright bigotry of the Ewells and others in town. I had forgotten how prevalent it was in the book.

 

The world needs more Atticus Finches, and more respect for our mockingbirds, in whatever form they come.

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review 2016-11-12 03:00
Turkey Trick or Treat - Wendi Silvano,Lee Harper

Turkeys want candy too! At least the turkey in this story does, and he will dress as  just about anything to trick others into giving him sweet treats.I would use this story in my classroom to transition from Halloween to Thanksgiving and have my students create their own costume for their turkey sheet. After this, I would have them write what they are thankful for.

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