logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Ian-Rankin
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-13 02:00
Rebus investing a cold case and a kidnapping
Rather Be the Devil - Ian Rankin

John Rebus is supposed to be retired. But he is still active as a cold case is linked to a new case.

 

A lot of talking to witnesses and tried to figure out what's going on.

 

The tone is pretty good and there isn't much action in this. The detective story read more like a literary work than an action packed story that I usually read.

 

So... I do find it a bit slow. 

 

Related image

 

I like the general feel of the story. But not so much of the story itself. Things move a bit faster after Rebus has guessed who did what and why.

 

But by that time, I might have already lost interest to find out the details. 

 

It is a 3.5 stars read for me. 

 

This is my Task 1 : Book themes for Día de Muertos and All Saint’s Day:  A book that has a primarily black and white cover, or one that has all the colours (ROYGBIV) together on the cover.

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-06 03:41
An Interesting Look at a Road not Taken for Rankin's Rebus
Death Is Not the End: A Novella - Ian Rankin

I used Goodreads' ordering of the Rebus series to determine when I read this novella -- other sites might have led me to read this before Dead Souls, as it was published. I might have gotten more out of this book if I'd read it in that order, but it might have hurt the novel. I'm not sure.

 

Basically, this is one of the subplots of Dead Souls -- Rebus' looking for the missing son of a people he knew in school -- in its original form. It'd be modified, expanded, and given a different ending in the novel. There's a subplot, mildly related, involving organized crime and gambling -- in much the same way that other crimes were associated with the missing person's case in Dead Souls.

 

It is interesting to see how Rankin wrote something, and then came back a couple of years later and repurposed it. But that's about all I have to say for this. It was interesting -- but the version in the novel is better. The subplot didn't do much for me, either. It was okay, but it really didn't seem necessary.

 

The completist in me is glad I read it, but I think I'd have been okay with missing it, too.

 

2017 Library Love Challenge

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-02 11:52
Wily old fox
Even Dogs in the Wild - Ian Rankin

After so many years it is still great to read about that wonderful creation from Ian Rankin, that wily old fox who even in retirement can never let go; John Rebus. "Even Dogs in the Wild" is once again written to a very high standard and inevitably sees Rebus not so much confronting but consulting with his great adversary Big Ger Cafferty. As the years have passed they have developed perhaps not a fondness but a grudging respect for each other. The plot revolves around the murder of a well known MP and his association with "Acorn House" a care home for children. Given the amount of news coverage attributed to sexual abuse and in particular sexual abuse of minors it comes as no surprise the direction and shape this story takes. To me the bolder than life characters are more important than the theme and in this Rankin excels with shady underworld connections in the guise of Darryl Christie and Morris Cafferty and the robust old fashioned policing, nor forgetting the deadpan humour, of Detective Inspector John Rebus (retired) Rebus is everything you would expect a detective, whose routes lie in the past, to be. His methods are more suited to dogged hands on police work rather than as I am sure he would describe...fancy computers. He has no interest in the comforts of this world preferring to drive an old Saab, listen to bygone bands on his record player (The Steve Miller band and the amazing Rory Gallagher) and relaxing at the end of the day in his favourite watering hole The Oxford Bar with a pint of IPA close by.

 

Those readers acquainted with the style and wit of Ian Rankin will devour this story, just like stepping into a comfy pair of slippers. The only sadness is knowing that in the not too distant future John Rebus must surely finish leaving the reader to ponder if he will finally be stopped... his own decision? ill health? or perhaps have his life ended suddenly by an old acquaintance or underworld operator!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-11-24 18:45
A Weekend with Few Plans!
The Mummy Case - Elizabeth Peters
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix - J.K. Rowling
The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu: And Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious Manuscripts - Joshua Hammer
Hide and Seek - Ian Rankin
The Great Starvation Experiment: The Heroic Men Who Starved so That Millions Could Live - Todd Tucker

Such a rarity and I appreciate it very much.  Saturday will be errand day and Sunday will be for cooking.  With lots of breaks for reading.

 

And I will finish The Mummy Case, dang it!  Don't know why I've been so easily distracted from it, but I will finish it this evening.

 

The Great Starvation Experiment is surprising--I am finding it somewhat creepy!  Who would do this to their fellow human beings?

 

Have a great weekend!

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-21 02:03
Wherein I have little to say about an
Dead Souls - Ian Rankin
For the best part of an hour, Rebus had been trying to blink away a hangover, which was about as much exercise as he could sustain. He'd planted himself on benches and against walls, wiping his brow even though Edinburgh's early spring was a blood relative of midwinter. His shirt was damp against his back, uncomfortably tight every time he rose to his feet.


This might actually be the high point for Rebus in this novel -- at least as far as the way he feels goes. The bad news is, this is from Chapter 1. Clearly, Jack Morton's influence has clearly ended. Rebus is moments away from doing something he'll regret almost instantly and that will have ramifications on everything he does for the foreseeable future, some of which will likely haunt him for more than that.

 

Which almost seems par for the course, I realize as I type that.

 

Anyway, Dead Souls focuses on crimes against children and what that can do to them -- not just at the moment they're victimized, but years later. There are also unintended (and fully intended consequences of crimes against adults throughout the book -- Rebus' own hands aren't entirely clean here. Rebus' actions in the opening pages cast enough of a shadow on him that his very brief involvement on another case is used by the defense to cast a shadow on the police's investigation. He's also tasked to investigate the apparent suicide of a police detective, informally, anyway. His main task is to work with Siobhan Clarke and a rookie to be a very obvious police presence to a convicted multiple-murderer, recently released and deported from the US back to Scotland. They really can't do anything other than be visible for a few days until money runs out on the operation, but no one who knows this killer has any doubt that he'll strike again, and the police are trying to discourage that. Unofficially, Rebus makes things uncomfortable for a pedophile in his new home -- an act that will not go well and will spiral out of control -- and he's helping an old girlfriend look for her missing son.

 

Confused? Yeah, sure, I am -- and I wrote that summary. Somehow, Rankin is able to take all that mess and assemble it into a novel that actually makes sense -- with all of these stories being tied together, not just with over-lapping themes, but in reality in some sort of 6 degrees of separation fashion -- even excluding DI Rebus. It's really very impressive watching how Rankin weaves every strand of story and character in this novel -- it always is, but this web seems more intricate than usual.

 

The other police in this novel interest me -- I won't go down the list, but those who can't see why he cares about something, those who can't understand why he'd do something with so little regard to consequences are on one end -- the other end is filled by people (like Clarke) who know exactly what kind of man he is, and without approving or participating in the less-than-savory aspects his methods, can use him and them for good.

 

...he wondered why it was he was only ever happy on rewind. He thought back to times when he'd been happy, realising that at the time he hadn't felt happy; it was only in retrospect that it dawned on him. Why was that?

 

There's very little light in this novel, there's introspection, there's despair, there's hatred, fear, prejudice, and opportunists taking advantage of all of that. But somehow the book never seems slow or ponderous -- just Rebus chugging along, doing his thing. There's also some strong action -- some we see as it happens, but most we hear about after the fact (years or days alter). If you stop and think about how many criminal seem to "get away" with their crimes (as defined by not being charged/tried), it's not that satisfying. If you think about the book in terms of Rebus (and through him, the reader) understanding what happened and why -- it's satisfying, not really cheerful, but satisfying in that regard.

 

The souls that are dead here have been killed by various means and methods over time -- some realize that's what they are, some haven't a clue -- some come to realize it in these pages (and some try to revitalize themselves). By and large, they're dead souls walking, and seem intent on taking others with them. The question is: is DI Rebus among them?

 

I'm really not sure if I've said anything worthwhile about the book -- it's impressive, immersive and will not let you go -- even days after finishing it. I don't know that this is a bad one to be your first Rebus novel -- you may be willing to cut him more slack for his questionable actions if you've got a history with him than you would be otherwise, however. For me, this is just further proof that Rankin is one of the best and is getting better (or was, at this point in his career anyway)


2017 Library Love Challenge

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?