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review 2017-10-18 06:41
The Mystery of the Lost Cézanne (Verlaque and Bonnet, #5)
The Mystery of the Lost Cezanne - M.L. Longworth

Something went wrong somewhere in this book, and I don't know what it was or where it happened.  Ok, yes, I know where part of it went wrong; I knew who the murderer was reaching page 80, but that shouldn't have mattered much to my overall enjoyment.

 

The book is about the discovery of a lost painting of Cézanne's, which right away I love; I even enjoy the flashback POV chapters, a device that I'm at best ambivalent about.  The setting is Aix en Provence and it sounds as wonderful as it always has in Longworth's books, and Verlaque and Bonnet get more and more likeable with each book.  

 

But at some point after about 2/3 of the way through, it fizzled.  I don't like to say it's because there was no perilous climax, but it might be.  Everything was tied up neatly at the end, but it still felt unfinished, or more accurately, un-satisfying. 

 

Still an enjoyable read I always wanted to get back to, but not nearly as well constructed as the previous 4.

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text 2017-10-18 02:12
Reading progress update: I've read 101 out of 224 pages.
A Watery Grave - Jean Chapman

it's a wonderful Mystery novel, glad I've discovered this author, and if I wasn't so tired from being up a tad late last night, I would just keep at the pages. but there's always tomorrow morning...

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review 2017-10-18 02:07
Hickory Dickory Dock
Hickory Dickory Dock (Audio) - Agatha Christie,Hugh Fraser

Hercule Poirot frowned. 

"Miss Lemon," he said.

"Yes, M. Poirot?"

"There are three mistakes in this letter."

His voice held incredulity. For Miss Lemon, that hideous and efficient woman, never made mistakes. She was never ill, never tired, never upset, never inaccurate. For all practical purposes, that is to say, she was not a woman at all. She was a machine - the perfect secretary. She knew everything, she coped with everything. She ran Hercule Poirot's life for him, so that it, too, functioned like a machine.

Order and method had been Hercule Poirot's watchwords from many years ago. With George, his perfect manservant, and Miss Lemon, his perfect secretary, order and method ruled supreme in his life. Now that crumpets were baked square as well as round, he had nothing about which to complain.

Square crumpets?! Have I missed these so far?

 

Anyway, to the book... Hickory Dickory Dock was a fun read, in which Miss Lemon gets some page time. The story is set in 1955 in London and Miss Lemon is worried about her sister and the strange goings on at the hostel where her sister works: Things have gone missing.

 

In order to return to a life of normalcy and perfection, Poirot offers to help Miss Lemon's sister solve the mystery of the disappearing items.

 

Hickory Dickory Dock is a great story to note the differences in Christie's writing between the pre- and post-war periods. This story is set in the 50s, and the bright young things are now less decadent and more international. The youth comes across in Christie's dialogues reasonably well, but the international aspect made me cringe. 

Let's face it, despite her efforts, Christie just was not great at writing characters from non-English backgrounds.

 

Still, it was fun watching Poirot solve this, even if sometimes you just want to kick Poirot in the shins.

Hercule Poirot nodded understandingly. It seemed to him appropriate that Miss Lemon's sister should have spent most of her life in Singapore. That was what places like Singapore were for. The sisters of women like Miss Lemon married men in business in Singapore, so that the Miss Lemons of this world could devote themselves with machine-like efficiency to their employers' affairs (and of course to the invention of filing systems in their moments of relaxations).

 

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text 2017-10-18 00:45
Reading progress update: I've read 62 out of 224 pages.
A Watery Grave - Jean Chapman

another book recommended by Barry Forshaw in his book called Brit Noir; much as I appreciate my new "reading guide" from Martin Edwards, this Forshaw fellow has proven to be a good source when it comes to more recent Crime & Mystery suggestions. I even love the fact that A Watery Grave doesn't even look like it fits in as a "Noir" choice--cover of book makes it look like a Cozy, with a rural/marine setting--and I initially balked at ordering something like this. but Noir apparently does not have to be urban  and feature serial murders or back alleys. I love the amateur sleuth in this, John Cannon, former cop who is pissing off the official copper, the horrid Inspector Jones. the night-time scenes--where odd and bad stuff inevitably happens--are creepy (even when it's just dusk), and we have two bodies now. best of all, though there's a Noir feel, there's also a vague "Golden Age" feel, especially in the style--as in echoes of Freeman Wills Crofts, or, from just a bit later, Francis Duncan. I'm very happy!

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-10-17 23:02
Book review : YOU Caroline Kepnes
You: A Novel - Caroline Kepnes

September 29- October 11

        When a beautiful, aspiring writer strides into the East Village bookstore where Joe Goldberg works, he does what anyone would do: he Googles the name on her credit card. There is only one Guinevere Beck in New York City. She has a public Facebook account and Tweets incessantly, telling Joe everything he needs to know: she is simply Beck to her friends, she went to Brown University, she lives on Bank Street, and she’ll be at a bar in Brooklyn tonight—the perfect place for a “chance” meeting. As Joe invisibly and obsessively takes control of Beck’s life, he orchestrates a series of events to ensure Beck finds herself in his waiting arms. Moving from stalker to boyfriend, Joe transforms himself into Beck’s perfect man, all while quietly removing the obstacles that stand in their way—even if it means murder. This book was all kinds of fucked up but I really enjoyed it . 

Review :This book is about Joe who becomes obsessed with a girl who came into the bookstore he works at he ends up stalking her and ends up taking the guy she's fucking hostage and eventually kills him . Beck and Joe are both terrible people Beck is very fake and her friend peach is totally obsessed with her . Joe and Beck end up dating and what I think is more creepy about this book it's not saying Beck it says YOU . Joe realizes peach is in his way and tries to kill her also and eventually does . Beck pulls away from Joe and Joe ends up seeing someone else but he's still obsessed with Beck but they end up getting back together but she finds out about everything all the creepy stuff of her's he was storing and he keeps her hostage in the bookstore in the basement and he ends up killing her this book was so fucked up .

       

Quotes : The problem with books is that they end. They seduce you. They spread their legs to you and pull you inside. And you go deep and leave your possessions and your ties to the world at the door and you like it inside and you don't want for your possessions or your ties and then, the book evaporates.”

 

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