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text 2021-02-13 11:28
Pre-Order Now: When Love Fails by Fizza Younis

 

Title: When Love Fails

Author: Fizza Younis

Genre: Short Stories, Contemporary, Fiction

Release Date: 15th February 2021

Buy Link: https://books2read.com/u/4Dg1xr

 

About the Book

It’s a collection of short stories about love, heartbreak, second chances, and letting go of the feelings that weigh you down.


Some stories don't start well, but end with a happily ever after. Yet, sometimes happy beginnings are all we can get. When love fails, it leaves behind lost souls unable to find their way back to life. What happens then? And what if it wins? The only certainty in life is that it's uncertain. No one knows what will happen next. How best you deal with the complications that ensue from your actions is what will define you and seal your fate.

 

About the Author

Fizza lives with her family and books. She is an avid reader who loves to write stories about interesting people and their misadventures. Books are the most important part of her life, and she cannot imagine living without them. She also enjoys painting and spending time with friends. She takes stories seriously because they are always telling us more than we’re ready to hear. She is just an average person in the actual world, but in the world of the books, she is spectacular.

 

Find her at; Facebook * Twitter * Instagram * Goodreads

 

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text 2020-10-29 16:12
Somewhere in Time by Fizza Younis

 

 
Title: Somewhere in Time

Author: Fizza Younis

Release Date: 31st Oct, 2020

Available for Pre-Order: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08L9NTQ8K

Add to Goodreads Shelf: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/55709081-somewhere-in-time

Bookbub link: https://www.bookbub.com/books/somewhere-in-time-by-fizza-younis

Synopsis

When one was dead and the other slumbered in peace...

Would the two ever meet?

 

Somewhere in Time is a retelling of the classic fairy tale, Sleeping Beauty. The story is set between the twentieth and the twenty-first century. With a much darker paranormal twist and no happily ever-after within sight, it follows the journey of our beloved characters; Aurora and Prince Phillip. What the future holds for them is yet to be determined, so read on to find out how their story unfolds this time around.

 

 

 

 

 

Source: bookseaterme.blogspot.com/2020/10/coming-soon-somewhere-in-time-by-fizza.html
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review 2020-10-06 13:03
Truthtelling by Lynne Sharon Schwartz

I love a good collection of short stories! This book didn't disappoint either.
Each story felt relatable. Especially A Lapse Of Memory. As we get older, it's so easy to get caught up in our own lives and forget about our parents. Time goes faster the older we get. Days can turn into weeks before you know it. It's even faster for our parents, but it's hard for us to realize that. This story hit home for me, although I text my mom every morning. Every single day withought fail. Having lost my dad, this lesson of parental love and comfort stays with me. Now I don't forget my mom, but I suffered loss to learn. 
I also really connected with A Few More Days. Being bipolar, I've had my share of days where I became introverted and reclusive. This story hit home with me as I felt each sentence.
What more can I say?! Read this book if you like stories that feel real. 

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2020/10/truthtelling-by-lynne-sharon-shwartz-50.html
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review 2020-09-09 17:26
The Captain's Daughter and Other Stories by Alexander Pushkin
The Captain's Daughter: And Other Stories - Alexander Pushkin

There’s a little sense of dissonance when I read a classic and my response is “huh, okay.” This is especially true when I read the classic in translation; in this case, the translation is very smooth, contemporary, and easy to read, which causes its own form of dissonance. These now feel like contemporary stories rather than something written in the early 19th century, and compared to contemporary stories they don’t particularly stand out to me, but then I neither read them in their original language nor am familiar with the history of Russian literature so as to appreciate the ways in which Pushkin was blazing a new trail.

The stories:

“The Captain’s Daughter”: This novella occupies almost half of the book. It involves a romance between a young officer and the angelic daughter of the captain, set during the time of Pugachev’s rebellion, and Pugachev himself is the most vibrant character in it. The story moves along briskly and is fairly satisfying, though the characters are not particularly complex. This edition also includes an omitted chapter, which is interesting in that Pushkin ditched a bunch of melodrama and overt paternalism.

“The Tales of Ivan Petrovich Belkin”: These five stories, mostly around 15 pages each, are given a framing device in that they were all collected by a fictional young dead man, but they aren’t actually linked, so I’ll discuss them separately.

“The Shot”: The narrator pieces together the story of a multi-episode duel from others. It’s a bleak world in which men are expected to kill and die in duels over the most mundane insults, and those who refuse lose all respect from their fellows. (Pushkin, sadly, died himself in a duel at age 37.)

“The Snowstorm”: A prank disrupts a love affair. This is a cleverly structured story, in which after reading the end you go back and read over the earlier parts with fresh eyes, something I love in a short story. It made me uncomfortable in that I didn’t find Burmin’s behavior deserving of a happy ending.

“The Undertaker”: A man has ungenerous thoughts and is punished with a nightmare. Um, okay.

“The Postmaster”: Another narrator piecing together someone else’s story, this time of a postmaster and his prodigal daughter. This didn’t do much for me.

“Mistress Into Maid”: A sweet little story about a forbidden romance, also involving some pranking, but this time harmless. I enjoyed this one.

“The Queen of Spades”: This is a somewhat longer story about gambling and obsession, in which a calculating young man will go to almost any length for a guaranteed win at cards. I found this one pretty good and with a satisfying ending.

“Kirdjali”: Eight pages about the legend of an Eastern European bandit. Okay.

“The Negro of Peter the Great”: This is an unfinished fragment, around 40 pages long, of what was perhaps intended to be a novel. The title isn’t politically correct these days but the “Negro” in question is a (lightly fictionalized?) version of Pushkin’s own maternal great-grandfather, Abram or Ibrahim Gannibal, who was brought to Russia as a boy, adopted by Peter the Great as his godson, sent to France to study military engineering, and later returned to Russia to be an important figure in the military and the court. The fragment deals largely with Ibrahim’s love troubles, as well as his relationship with Peter the Great, who’s presented in a very positive light. This is interesting from a historical perspective though a fragment is unlikely to satisfy in a storytelling sense.

Overall, I’m glad to have read some work by a classic author I hadn’t been exposed to before, and appreciated the window into 18th and early 19th century Russia. But while the writing is perfectly fine, I can’t say any of it blew me away. I also have the sense that this collection doesn’t represent Pushkin’s best work, much of which was poetry and plays.

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review 2020-08-29 15:08
The Terrifying Tales by Edgar Allen Poe
Terrifying Tales: Tell Tale Heart; The Cask of the Amontillado; The Masque of the Red Death; The Fall of the House of Usher; The Purloined Letter; The Pit and the Pendulum - Edgar Allan Poe

Let me break down each tale, by telling you which ones I loved and which I did not.
I loved The Tell-Tale Heart. This is a story of how your own conscience can betray you and give you up. I also really enjoyed The Murders In The Rue Morgue. It was an interesting whodunnit with an unexpected outcome.
I did not like The Cask of Amontillado. It was just confusing and I don't get it at all.
I also did not like The Masque of the Red Death. I tell you this, the story made me never want to go to a ball and engage in revelry. Thankfully, I don't see any balls in my future. The rest of the stories were decent. And all-in-all I am glad I read some Poe. Another great classic writer that I can add to my read list!

 

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2020/08/the-terrifying-tales-by-edgar-allen-poe.html
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