logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Paperboy
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2015-01-16 22:07
Paperboy Book Review
Paperboy - Vince Vawter

I'm having trouble finding decent books this year. Have yet to fall in love with one yet. Paperboy is being said to be just as well done as To Kill A Mockingbird - absolutely not. While it has some of the same themes, it comes no where close to the writing style and brilliance that is To Kill A Mockingbird

 

Little Man, an eleven year old who can't talk because he stutters, has never been able to hold a real conversation with adults or children his age. When he's left doing the paper run he's forced to learn to communicate with several odd people on his route. 

 

I found this mostly boring. A repetetive story of a young boy's paper route. I appreciate that it is about a child who stutters and has trouble talking to people. I just couldn't get interested in it. The character comes off fairly dull and because he stutters there's absolutely no comma's or hardly any grammar, not a fan. 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2014-12-31 06:51
A BAKER'S DOZEN: My Off-The-Beaten-Path Favorites From 2014
All the Light We Cannot See: A Novel - Anthony Doerr
The Girl with All the Gifts - M.R. Carey
By Karen Joy Fowler We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves: A Novel (Reprint) - Karen Joy Fowler
Ophelia and the Marvelous Boy - Karen Foxlee
Women in Bed: Nine Stories - Jessica Keener
Perfect - Rachel Joyce
Paperboy - Vince Vawter
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August - Claire North
Sous Chef: 24 Hours on the Line - Michael Gibney
The Removers: A Memoir - Andrew Meredith

So this year was truly an embarrassment of riches. I had to really pair this list down, because when I went through and selected the books I had given four or five stars to this year, there were more than a baker’s dozen. So, I tried to take off a few of the higher profile books, the ones that really don’t need a nudge from me or anyone else to boost their sales. I chose a variety as well, including a short story collection, a couple memoirs, a lot of great fiction, some awesome middle grade, and of course, a zombie book, all in no particular order. Who would have thought I would have to choose between two zombie books before only one made the cut? I realize there is no solid non-fiction here, so I will have to work on that for next year.

 

Let me know if you have some for me to add to my TBR 2015.

 

  1. ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE

 

  1. THE GIRL WITH ALL THE GIFTS

 

  1. WE ARE ALL COMPLETELY BESIDE OURSELVES

 

  1. OPHELIA AND THE MARVELOUS BOY

 

  1. WOMEN IN BED

 

  1. PERFECT

 

  1. THE FIRST FIFTEEN LIVES OF HARRY AUGUST

 

  1. PAPERBOY

 

  1. SOUS CHEF: 24 HOURS ON THE LINE

 

  1. THE REMOVERS

 

  1. THE MOUNTAINTOP SCHOOL FOR DOGS

 

  1. MY COUSIN'S KEEPER

 

  1. THE SLEEPWALKER'S GUIDE TO DANCING

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2014-03-29 21:38
"Paperboy" by Christopher Fowler
Paperboy - Christopher Fowler

This is the third consecutive book I have read by Christopher Fowler - and all have been very different. Paperboy is a memoir of Christopher Fowler's childhood in suburban London during the 1950s and 1960s. He was a lonely boy who spent his days between the library and the cinema, whilst devouring novels and comics.

His family was very dysfunctional: a curious combination of the entertainingly eccentric, wilfully self-defeating and endearingly ordinary. Christopher Fowler perfectly captures the grim monochromatic world of post-war Britain before it became a more colour world from the late-1960s and, to an extent, broke free of the post-war world of tight-lipped austerity, stultifying conformity and thwarted ambition. 

Paperboy is far from perfect, and frequently felt meandering and lacking in focus, however there are more sections that are funny, charming, poignant and wise than anything else, and overall I enjoyed it. I'd say people who grew up in Britain in the 1950s, 1960s or 1970s would probably get more out of it as it's such a rich and astute evocation of an era that felt very familiar despite my being ten years younger than Christopher Fowler.

Like Reblog Comment
review 2014-03-10 00:00
Paperboy
Paperboy - Vince Vawter I really enjoyed listening to this book - the reader was excellent.
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2014-03-04 23:54
Paperboy
Paperboy - Vince Vawter

This book was a Newbery Honor book, so I feel a little after-the-fact recommending it. But this year I am trying to read as many Newbery Award winners as I can, and honestly, most of them I just check off when I’m done and move on without a post. After all, there are whole sections devoted to them in libraries and bookstores.

 

But this story was different. A friend gave me a copy of the audio book, so we listened to it at work. Yes, be jealous of me, I have the kind of office where we do that, out loud, on a regular basis. (There are only two of us, but still.)

 

The story takes place in Memphis, 1959, and it tackles some impressive issues — segregation, alcoholism, abuse, and stuttering, among others. Despite this, it is not what I would consider an “issue” book; it merely depicts a life in which all of these things occur. The narrator of the story stutters, and his description of the torturous process through which he is able to speak was stunning. Having gone through my early years of schooling with a girl who had a profound stutter, I was given new insight into what she must have dealt with every time she opened her mouth to speak. In the book, what amazed me most was the idea that the narrator edited everything he wanted to say based on the sounds he was able to make. The simple fact that he could not speak his own name was just heartbreaking. In fact, his name is not even spoken until the end of the story.

 

This story is uplifting, though, as he discovers there are people out there who will always listen, no matter how long it takes him to say what he feels. That most times, it is important to use the precise words, no matter how difficult they are to say. He discovers that not everyone is as they appear, but sometimes, you need to trust your instincts for the ones who are. The story is filled with love and caring. There are people who behave badly, of course, but then there are the rest, who provide large and small moments of wonder. I would say that this is a book for an older middle-grade reader, because it is a book that is more about heart than friendship or baseball, even though they are also themes.

 

I strongly recommend you listen to this book. I’m not sure I would have truly appreciated the struggles this boy faced if I had not heard it so clearly in each chapter. You could literally hear his pain. If you are reading this book, I think that after a while you might skip over some of the stuttering sounds, and they might lose their potency. Hearing them spoken aloud is jarring and new every time. You never lose the force of his effort. The author’s note at the end, read by the author himself, just confirms what you already knew, that this story is his story, and, while he has not fully overcome his stuttering, he has found a powerful way to make his voice heard.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?