logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Picture-Book
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-21 23:54
I seriously need to know what the teacups signify
Henry & Leo - Pamela Zagarenski

I tried explaining the Caldecott Honor to a group of pre-k children the other day. (It was pretty funny.) If you're unfamiliar, the Caldecott Medal and the Caldecott Honor are awarded to American illustrators whose work is singled out by the ALA as being "the most distinguished picture book for children". [Note: This does have a bearing on this post.]

 

I had decided to use a different style of picture book for my storytime and I chose to use Henry & Leo by Pamela Zagarenski. Two of the books that Zagarenski illustrated have been awarded the Caldecott Honor (Sleep Like a Tiger and Red Sings From Treetops: A Year in Colors). You might have guessed that because she was both author and illustrator that Henry & Leo is most likely a visually stunning book...and you'd be correct. However, the kids weren't overly impressed with the storyline. :-/ I don't think this was so much the fault of the author but more a mistake on my part for trying this out with a group of pre-k aged children (solo reading for this age would most likely work fine though). It's a bit too introspective for such a large age of young children. The story centers on Henry who has a best friend named Leo...who is a stuffed lion. To Henry, Leo is absolutely 100% alive and he can't understand why his sister and parents fail to see this simple fact. Through a series of adventures, the reader learns just how much Leo and Henry mean to each other. I encouraged the kids to point out the crowns and other little treats that Zagarenski uses in all of her illustrations (without any explanation I might add). This was everyone's favorite thing to do but none of them could tell me much about the story after we'd finished so it wasn't as successful as I would have ultimately liked. Personally, I felt it lacked the heart that I had expected based on the premise and the beautiful artwork. I recommend that you check it out for yourself because I (and the children) might be overly harsh in our judgment. :-) For the record, this doesn't mean that I won't be checking out more of Zagarenski's work just that this one wasn't my all-time favorite. 3/5

Source: readinfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-17 18:25
Does lion rhyme with iron?
Frog on a Log? - Jim Field,Kes Gray

This is my favorite picture book of 2017 and that's saying quite a lot. I liked it so much in fact that I bought a copy for myself and a copy for my mom (if you know mom then you know why I did this). It's a hilarious, rhyming story about a frog who thinks that the rule that all frogs sit on logs (told to him by a wiseacre cat) is unfair because logs are uncomfortable. What follows is the cat informing the frog about the rules of where certain animals are allowed to sit. (Look out for the fleas and make sure you ask the little people you're reading with to find them for you.) If you're using this in a storytime, I encourage you to read with panache and infuse the cat with lots of exasperated attitude. It's a fantastically fun experience when you get your audience invested enough to be shocked by the ending (which is hysterical by the way). The illustrations are absolutely adorable (I'm going to be looking for more works by Jim Field I think) and create another layer of playfulness which I appreciated. I highly recommend this book for anyone and everyone (but especially those who work or live with small children). 10/10

 

Note: It seems that in the UK where this was originally published it was titled Oi Frog! which puzzles me mightily. Also, there's a sequel which is out and which I must get my hands on titled Oi Dog! (I don't get why they would change the name here in the US).

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-03-14 23:23
Read This Book to Advanced Readers!
This Is Not a Picture Book! - Sergio Ruzzier

This is a perfect book for teachers to read to students who are starting to move out of picture books and are now reading chapter books. This book's text describes a character that doesn't want to read a book because it doesn't have any pictures, but the character figures out that words describe the picture to the reader. The pictures heavily support and add to the text- when the character says that books say "sad" things, the pictures show what the character is probably reading about. Overall, this is a great book that should be read aloud to a class of any age. Teachers should stress "Reading books without pictures shouldn't scare you off" when reading it to the class. The teacher could even read the book without showing the pictures then read it while showing the pictures. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-14 15:57
Gives new meaning to "What's in the fridge?"
Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast - Josh Funk,Brendan Kearney

A few weeks ago, I read a book called Dear Dragon which was about a pen pal relationship between a little boy and a dragon but they had no idea they were writing to someone of a different species. The illustrations were on point but it was the storyline that had me looking to see what else the author had written. (His name is Josh Funk by the way.) Turns out he had another book by the snazzy title of Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast (with a sequel called The Case of the Stinky Stench due out on May 2nd). This book has fantastic illustrations by Brendan Kearney which truly bring the fridge food to life. If you're reading aloud to pre-school age children, I highly encourage you to have the kids make predictions and point out their favorite (and least favorite) food items. Otherwise, this book might be a bit of a daunting read-aloud because there are quite a few challenging words (and lots of them) per each page. It follows our two main characters, Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast, on an epic quest to reach the last drop of syrup remaining in the syrup bottle. Lots of ridiculous rhyming, competitive taunting, and delicious food items abound. 9/10 for frolicking foodie fun.

 

Note: If you do decide to use this as a storytime read-aloud and/or you utilize this in a lesson I recommend you check out Josh's website which has a free downloadable activity kit to complement the book.

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-14 00:53
Horton Hatches the Egg by Dr. Seuss
Horton Hatches the Egg - Dr. Seuss

Genre:  Animals / Responsibility / Drama / Family


Year Published: 1940


Year Read:  2010

Series: Horton the Elephant #1

Publisher: Random House

 

Horton

"Horton Hatches the Egg" is one of Dr. Seuss' most memorable classics as it stars everyone's favorite elephant, Horton! This time, Horton has his hands full as he tries his best to take care of a lazy bird named Mayzie's egg while she goes off to take a vacation. Unfortunately, hunters come in the jungle and they got Horton trapped! Will Horton get out of this dangerous predicament and still protect Mayzie's egg? Read the story to find out!

Dr. Seuss had done a great job at both illustrating and writing this book. What was so unique about this book were the illustrations. The main colors used for the images were blue, black, white and red, which makes the book extremely creative as few books use only three or four colors to color the images. Horton the elephant always wore a smile on his face, despite his horrendous situation, making him a truly innocent and friendly animal. A great trait that this book has shown is how loyal and determine Horton is as he was willing to take care of Mayzie's egg and he refused to let anyone tease him about taking care of the egg since he wanted to follow on his word that he will take good care of the egg.

Horton

The only problem this book has, in terms of if it is appropriate for children, is that Mayzie was being selfish around Horton and she refused to take responsibility for taking care of her egg at the expense of Horton. But, don't worry, Mayzie's irresponsible actions are shown in a negative light and the story strongly encourages children to be more responsible and to not follow Mayzie's example of irresponsibility.

"Horton Hatches the Egg" is truly a memorable classic about the importance of being loyal and keeping your promise to people and this book will easily be an instant hit for children everywhere. I would recommend this book to children ages four and up since there is nothing inappropriate in this book unless you count Mayzie's irresponsible behavior being unsuitable for children to learn from.

Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

Banner

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?