logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Poems
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-04-24 01:06
Firsties
Afterland: Poems - Mai Der Vang

I usually don't much care if I'm one of the first to read a new release.

 

In fact, it's quite rare when that happens. I often go years before I "get around to" reading a book (although the release of a film adaptation can move a title forward quickly). 

 

But a rather unusual thing happened to me in the past month: I actually read a new title BEFORE its release date. Mai Der Vang, the newest Walt Whitman Award winner, appeared in our city in March, and her publisher, Graywolf Press, sent copies of her book, "Afterland," in advance of the official release date. My colleague, Paul, loaned me his copy when he was finished with it, and I dove in with gusto. 

 

Vang is a Hmong-American writer, and this collection speaks to the experiences of the diaspora that has occurred in the decades since the Vietnam war. The imagery is rich, the use of language creative and powerful.

 

But my best compliment is that the book is truly a collection, an organized, thoughtful representation of an overarching theme, rather than a compilation of individual poems. This is not surprising, because Graywolf-released poetry books generally have this kind of care in editing. 

 

So there - early adopter. Stay tuned - another opportunity may soon be coming my way. 

 

-cg

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-04-18 13:34
13th April 2017
Opened Ground: Selected Poems, 1966-1996 - Seamus Heaney

If you have the words, there's always a chance that you'll find the way.

 

Seamus Heaney

 

Irish poet and Nobel Prize-winner Seamus Heaney (born April 13, 1939) enjoyed both critical acclaim and widespread popularity. By 2008, two-thirds of poetry books sold in the UK were by Heaney.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-16 20:17
The Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson
The Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson - Emily Dickinson,Rachel Wetzsteon

The Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson contains a sizeable sample of the total works of the reclusive poet, who only came to prominence after her death.  Containing 593 poems separated into five different themes, roughly a third of her overall productivity, this collection gives the reader a wonderful look into the talent of a woman who hid her art not only from the world but also her own family.  Besides nearly 600 poems of Dickinson’s work, the reader is given a 25 page introduction to the poet and an analysis of her work by Dr. Rachel Wetzsteon who helps reveal the mysterious artist as best as she can and help the reader understand her work better.  Although neither Wetzsteon’s introduction and analysis nor Dickinson’s work is wanting, the fact that this collection gives only a sample of the poet’s work is its main and only flaw.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-12 20:37
Magdalene, by Marie Howe [poetry]
Magdalene: Poems - Marie Howe

I began reading Marie Howe when I was an undergrad taking my first poetry workshops. At first, I wasn't sure I liked her style, which is deceptively simple or plain. This was a contrast to many other poets I was introduced to at the same time, such as Mark Doty and Yusef Komunyakaa. But somewhere along the line, I fell in love with her aesthetic, and that first book of hers I read, What the Living Do, remains a favorite and a touchstone.

 

I now recognize and admire the delicate straightforwardness of Howe's language, which packs as much power as any formal poem or one with more verbal jujitsu. Her lines can be long, with lots of room between them or stanzas. They feel quiet, contemplative, so when there's a turn or revelation coming, it heightens the impact. I'm trying to explain her appeal, but part of it is that I can't. Or I could if I analyzed it to death, and I prefer letting the magic linger.

 

The poems' subjects range from desire to mental health, self-perception, spirituality, and motherhood. Though I don't read the book like one overarching narrative, it does feel like there's an arc; there's a fullness to that arc that somehow replicates the sensation of completing a big, fat novel. You have an idea of a life.

 

Here's a favorite:

 

How the Story Started

 

I was driven toward desire by desire.

believing that the fulfillment of that desire was an end.

There was no end.

 

Others might have looked into the future and seen

a shape inside the coming years --

a house, a child, a man who might be a help.

 

I saw his back bent over what he was working on,

the back of his neck, how he stood in his sneakers,

and wanted to eat him.

 

How could I see another person, I mean who he was--apart from me--

apart from that?

 

Like Reblog Comment
text 2017-04-08 04:21
It's Snowing, It's Snowing
It's Snowing! It's Snowing!: Winter Poems - Jack Prelutsky, Yossi Abolafia (Illustrator)

NP

Pre K-5

This is a poem story about winter.  This story tells all about winter and what the students can expect to occur during winter.  I would do a lesson on differences.  Snowflakes are all different just like people are.  The students would fold paper and cut shapes out and when it was unfolded it would have a design.  Each student's design/snowflake would be different just like they all are.  The students will see that they all have individual snowflakes that are similar in some ways and different in others.  They can apply this to their classmates.  Some of them will be more similar or different.

4 Stars

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?