logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Poems
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-06-18 14:20
Laura Bush's WaPo article & a poem for fathers
Collected Poems - Robert Hayden,Frederick Glaysher,Arnold Rampersad

Belated happy Father's Day to all the Father's and mothers and people who act as fathers out there in booklikes world!

 

Two things: A great article by former US First Lady Laura Bush on the horrors of separating children from families found in the Washington Post. Good for her speaking up.

 

And on a less political note - a poem I've always found incredibly poignant about fathers

 

 

 Those Winter Sundays (a poem that could be for Father's Day) by Robert Hayden
 
Sundays too my father got up early
and put his clothes on in the blueblack cold,
then with cracked hands that ached
from labor in the weekday weather made
banked fires blaze. No one ever thanked him.
 
I’d wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking.
When the rooms were warm, he’d call,
and slowly I would rise and dress,
fearing the chronic angers of that house,
 
Speaking indifferently to him,
who had driven out the cold
and polished my good shoes as well.
What did I know, what did I know
of love’s austere and lonely offices?
 
 
Source: Collected Poems of Robert Hayden (Liveright Publishing Corporation, 1985)
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-14 16:51
Map: Collected and Last Poems by Wislawa Szymborska
Map: Collected and Last Poems - Wisława Szymborska,Clare Cavanagh,Stanisław Barańczak

Map spans Polish Nobel laureate Szymborska's work from the 1940s up until 2011. Her poetry is immediately engaging, often funny, and down-to-earth. She writes about the smallest subjects (a cat alone in its owner's home) and the largest (mortality, time). She'd be an excellent poet to read if one is new to or intimidated by poetry.

 

The translation by Clare Cavanagh and Stanislaw Baranczak is impressive given that many of Szymborska's poems play with words and language, though, not knowing Polish myself, I can only give my impressions. I only know that a personable, curious voice comes through.

 

Here's a late poem (about this painting) whose beauty brought tears to my eyes:

 

Vermeer

 

So long as that woman from the Rijksmuseum

in painted quiet and concentration

keeps pouring milk day after day

from the pitcher to the bowl

the World hasn't earned

the world's end.

 

I can't remember what prompted me to finally read Szymborska's body of work beyond the occasional anthologized poem, but I'm glad I did. I asked for it last Christmas (I read poetry only in print and often ask for books of poems then; they can be expensive!), and I happened to flip to "Possibilities," written as a list of preferences, which contains the following lines: "I prefer the absurdity of writing poems / to the absurdity of not writing poems." Me too.

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-02 18:11
(Audiobook) Classic Love Poems
FREE: Classic Love Poems - William Shakespeare,Edgar Allan Poe,Elizabeth Barrett Browning,Richard Armitage

Richard Armitage reading classic poetry. I mean, how can you go wrong, right?

 

The only thing that kept it from a 5-star rating was it wasn't long enough to suit me.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-04-22 16:38
Reading progress update: I've read 164 out of 1102 pages.
Complete Poems, 1904-1962 - E.E. Cummings

It's  nice to be alert enough to read some poetry for once!

Like Reblog Comment
photo 2018-04-19 18:08
The Complete Stories and Poems - Edgar Allan Poe

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow;—vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore—

 


I’m almost finished reading Fahrenheit 451, and while that little tidbit may seem wholly unrelated, bear with me. As many of you know, books are illegal in Bradbury’s story, but there’s a part when Guy reads a poem to his wife and her friends, and one of her friends starts sobbing without knowing why. They hadn’t felt anything real in so long, if ever - everything that was shoved down their throats was fake happiness they thought they needed. But hearing a poem caused her to cry uncontrollably, and Guy began to doubt that books should ever be brought back to light. That maybe happiness was better, even if it was shallow. Guy seems to be learning his own depths at this point, and his hesitation really struck me. I’ve always found the sorrowful or the tragic to be the most breathtaking. Like Poe, for example. There would never be a moment when I thought that sorrow should be hidden from the world. And I’m so glad that works like Poe’s exist. Could you imagine a world without authors like him? Or ANY authors, for that matter? 


If I’m rambling, I apologize! Fahrenheit 451 is just so provoking and relevant - read it, if you haven’t yet! And PS, HBO is making a new flick of it to be released next month

Source: getfictional.com
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?