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review 2016-11-21 17:45
REVIEW BY MERISSA - Rage and Redemption (Rebel Angels #1) by Cyndi Friberg
Rage and Redemption (Rebel Angels) - Cyndi Friberg
Rage and Redemption is the first book in the Rebel Angels series, and tells the story of Gideon, an angel not quite Fallen but very close, and Naomi, an orphan staying in a monastery under the watchful eye of Gabriel. Gideon is being punished and the end time of his punishment is coming up, although he is unaware of that. He meets Naomi at the monastery is quickly becomes fascinated with her. This starts his journey of dealing with his issues, before the time runs out. 
 
This was an enjoyable read, with very clear descriptions, both of the places and the characters. There were no editing or grammatical errors that disrupted my reading flow. Naomi faces her own challenges during this book, so it isn't all about Gideon. A complete tale in and of itself, yet giving a good description and introduction to the other Rebel Angels. Definitely recommended.
 
* Verified Purchase - March 2013 *
 
Merissa
Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!
Source: archaeolibrarianologist.blogspot.de/2016/11/review-by-merissa-rage-and-redemption.html
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review 2015-12-03 04:08
Rebel Angels
Rebel Angels - Libba Bray

I liked this book more than the first.  I liked the way the characters where developing and seeing them in a different setting from Spence. I personally liked seeing what their time outside of school would look like and I liked the love interests. That being said I did have to keep reminding myself that these are young teenage girls because I was getting so frustrated with their naivety and vanity.  There are some good twists in this book that make me question everything and everyone

 

Anagrams, the sign that one of your key characters is about to be revealed as evil.

(spoiler show)

 

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review 2014-06-26 07:05
The Rebel Angels
The Rebel Angels - Robertson Davies Robertson Davies’ The Rebel Angels is an engaging and energetic novel with a vigorous sense of humor. The novel reads quickly and never feels weighed down by ideas or seriousness. This is deceptive. Davies gives us a novel populated by Medieval and Renaissance scholars. Their intellectual landscape is thus not unnaturally populated by Paracelsus and Rabelais, two constant figures in the dialectic of the novel. Of the two, Rabelais seems the most significant. He is a figure frequently claimed by both sides of the numerous arguments in the novel. He provides a lens through which we see into the characters a bit more deeply than they might hope. Parlabane and McVarish make him a model of vulgarity and misogyny, or perhaps more accurately, misanthropy. To Hollier, he represents an object for his own academic ambition. For Maria and Darcourt—and Davies—he is a model of the best sort of scholar, as we hear from Maria: Rabelais was gloriously learned because learning amused him, and so far as I am concerned that is learning’s best justification. Not the only one, but the best. It may be wrong to include Darcourt here—as a priest scholar, his greater reference is St. Augustine: Conloqui et conridere et vicissim benevole obsequi, simul leger libros dulciloquos, simul nugari et simul honestari. In Maria’s translation: Conversations and jokes together, mutual rendering of good services, the reading together of sweetly phrased books, the sharing of nonsense and mutual attentions. This erudite amusement is a hallmark of everything I have yet read by Davies, and it is tempting to think that the best part of what Davies gives us in this novel is Davies, himself. Davies is more wise than a mere intellectual, and more alive than a modernist. He brings with him the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, and with these life fuller than which we are accustomed today. What we get from Davies is not a hair shirted historicism, but a sense of wholeness for a consciousness which is fermented in the broadness of human experience. Maria says of Hollier that he studies the Middle Ages because they are truly middle—a vantage from which he can look backward to antiquity, and forward to our post-Renaissance present. This dynamic of looking backward and forward, contrasting each with the other, is at the very heart of The Rebel Angels, a book which makes attractive Paracelsus’ “second paradise.” The striving for wisdom is the second paradise of the world.
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review 2014-06-26 04:55
The Cornish Trilogy: The Rebel Angels, What's Bred in the Bone, and The Lyre of Orpheus
The Cornish Trilogy: The Rebel Angels, What's Bred in the Bone, and The Lyre of Orpheus - Robertson Davies The Rebel Angels Robertson Davies’ The Rebel Angels is an engaging and energetic novel with a vigorous sense of humor. The novel reads quickly and never feels weighed down by ideas or seriousness. This is deceptive. Davies gives us a novel populated by Medieval and Renaissance scholars. Their intellectual landscape is thus not unnaturally populated by Paracelsus and Rabelais, two constant figures in the dialectic of the novel. Of the two, Rabelais seems the most significant. He is a figure frequently claimed by both sides of the numerous arguments in the novel. He provides a lens through which we see into the characters a bit more deeply than they might hope. Parlabane and McVarish make him a model of vulgarity and misogyny, or perhaps more accurately, misanthropy. To Hollier, he represents an object for his own academic ambition. For Maria and Darcourt—and Davies—he is a model of the best sort of scholar, as we hear from Maria: Rabelais was gloriously learned because learning amused him, and so far as I am concerned that is learning’s best justification. Not the only one, but the best. It may be wrong to include Darcourt here—as a priest scholar, his greater reference is St. Augustine: Conloqui et conridere et vicissim benevole obsequi, simul leger libros dulciloquos, simul nugari et simul honestari. In Maria’s translation: Conversations and jokes together, mutual rendering of good services, the reading together of sweetly phrased books, the sharing of nonsense and mutual attentions. This erudite amusement is a hallmark of everything I have yet read by Davies, and it is tempting to think that the best part of what Davies gives us in this novel is Davies, himself. Davies is more wise than a mere intellectual, and more alive than a modernist. He brings with him the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, and with these life fuller than which we are accustomed today. What we get from Davies is not a hair shirted historicism, but a sense of wholeness for a consciousness which is fermented in the broadness of human experience. Maria says of Hollier that he studies the Middle Ages because they are truly middle—a vantage from which he can look backward to antiquity, and forward to our post-Renaissance present. This dynamic of looking backward and forward, contrasting each with the other, is at the very heart of The Rebel Angels, a book which makes attractive Paracelsus’ “second paradise.” The striving for wisdom is the second paradise of the world. What's Bred In The Bone to follow... The Lyre Of Orpheus to follow...
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review 2014-06-04 00:00
Rebel Angels
Rebel Angels - Libba Bray Not as good as the first one. Overly long, and the inconsistent characterisation really begins to show here. Ms Nightwing, with her advice at the end, seems to have done a complete volte-face on her behaviour towards Pippa with regard to Mr Bumble. Plus, I really don't get Mrs. Worthington's character or Miss Moore's, either. Their actions weren't consistent with what we already know about them ( in Miss Moore's case I realise that this may be intentional, but why, for instance, does she give away her middle name when that risks her being found out before she can get Gemma to take her to the realms?)

I dunno, I have the third one here so I will read it, but I don't have any hunger for it, currently.
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