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review 2017-03-24 19:06
One Sentence Review – Wolf at the Door by Christine Warren @ChrstineWarren
Wolf at the Door - Christine Warren

I won some of Christine Warren’s books from by sister, Laura, @ fuonlyknew, sooooo…

 

I am on a were kick and loving every minute of it.

 

Wolf at the Door (The Others, #9)

 

Amazon  /  Goodreads

 

Wolf at the Door by Christine Warren is a steamy paranormal romance with fun dialogue and characters that quickly won me over as they struggle to discover who is behind the attacks, creating a sense of danger and suspense, and making this a novel you want on your reading list.

Animated Animals. Pictures, Images and Photos 3 Stars

 

GOODREADS BLURB:  Sullivan Quinn didn’t travel 3,000 miles from his native Ireland and his wolf pack just to chase rabidly after the most delectable quarry he’s ever seen. Quinn is in America on a mission—to warn his Other brethren of a shadowy group willing to use murder and mayhem to bring them down. But one whiff of this Foxwoman’s delicious honeysuckle fragrance and he knows that she is more than a colleague or a conquest…she is his mate.

 

Anthropologist Cassidy Poe is a world-renowned authority on social interaction, but the overpowering desire she feels around Quinn defies every ounce of her expertise. Working by his side to uncover The Others’ enemies poses risks she never expected—to her own safety, to those she loves, and to her heart, as every encounter with Quinn proves more blissfully erotic than the last…

 

Now, with no one to trust but each other, Quinn and Cassidy face a foe that’s edging closer every day, threatening to destroy the life they’ve always known, and the passion they’ve just discovered…

 

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Wolf at the Door (The Others, #9)

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Source: www.fundinmental.com/one-sentence-review-wolf-at-the-door-by-christine-warren-chrstinewarren
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review 2017-03-21 09:36
“Breeds” by Keith C Blackmore
Breeds - Keith C. Blackmore

The main thing I enjoyed about “Breeds” is Keith Blackmore’s muscular writing style. He gets you up close and personal to the action. You feel fully present even when things get bloody, which they often do. Yet there’s nothing gratuitous or exploitative here. There’s just a situation that has consequences and things that have to get done.

 

The situation is set up to be tense and tightly focused. An old, disillusioned werewolf, living on a remote Newfoundland island, goes rogue and starts to draw attention to himself. He knows this will bring the wrath of the werewolf Wardens on him and prepares a surprise for them that threatens everyone on the island.

 

The story is told from multiple points of view: the rogue werewolf, one of the wardens sent to put him down, an islander caught up in the action and even the unwilling participants in the rogue’s surprise.

 

The story takes place mostly within a single day and night in the midst of fierce snowstorm. Blackmore summons up the sense of isolation and vulnerability of the inhabitants of the Newfoundland island and uses it to raise tension without making the islanders seem weak or stupid.

 

Although there is action on almost every page and a blockbuster/video game scale body-count, Blackmore manages to generate some empathy for everybody involved from rogue, through warden, through predators and prey. I found myself being swept along by the powerful narrative thrust of the tale and enjoying myself much more than I thought I would.

 

This is great entertainment for blowing cobwebs away. I’ve already ordered the next book in the series, even though it’s called “Breeds 2” – I wonder how long it took to arrive at that title?

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review 2017-03-20 23:32
Review – Onyx Webb by Richard Fenton & Andrea Waltz @OnyxWebb
Onyx Webb: Book Four: Episodes: 10, 11, & 12 - Andrea Waltz,Richard Fenton

Onyx Webb by Richard Fenton & Andrea Waltz is a combination of genres that’s filled with hours of captivating reading, and plenty of thrills and chills.

 

I LOVE this fabulous cover that makes me shiver and cringe in anticipation of the horrors between the pages.

 

Onyx Webb: Book Four: Episodes 10, 11, 12

 

Amazon  /  Goodreads

 

MY REVIEW

 

Onxy Webb is filled with death, murder, horror, ghosts, and lots of suspense and evil…

So beware. Check your Karma and see if you dare to enter, because your actions can have repercussions far beyond your wildest imagination.

 

Onyx Webb is a fabulous, mystical character that keeps surprising those around her and rightly so in my book. She is complex and misunderstood, and so not deserving of what is happening. I love that she takes her ‘life’ into her own hands, not leaving her fate up to others to decide.

 

Many of the characters are good ‘people’. Sometimes it was hard to know who was human and who was a ghost and I loved the surprise of learning who was who, or what.

I try to be alert, waiting for the next shoe to drop, the next accident to happen, the next person to die.

 

The tension and suspense is stretched, keeping me waiting, anticipating, fearing for my favorite characters.

 

Be careful how much of your heart you give to these characters, because some may not survive. I love when the author is not afraid to kill someone off, regardless of whether I like it or not.

 

What’s going to happen next and who is responsible? Many lives are tainted by the evil that touches them. Of course, there are those whose misfortunes I revel in as they get their just desserts.

 

 

Onyx Webb keeps pulling on me, drawing me in deeper and deeper as I struggle to accept the tragedies heaped on the characters. There is so much going on, so many characters and so much action, that the story calls to me, demanding I read on, read more, and more.

 

I voluntarily reviewed a copy of Onyx Webb:  Book IV by Richard Fenton & Andrea Waltz.

Animated Animals. Pictures, Images and Photos 4 Stars

 

  • You can see my Giveaways HERE.
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Source: www.fundinmental.com/review-onyx-webb-by-richard-fenton-andrea-waltz-onyxwebb
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review 2017-03-19 15:00
Sarah Review
Sarah - Teri Polen

Teri Polen’s Sarah is a pleasingly creepy young adult horror. Fans of Supernatural will be delighted with this book. If you’ve ever watched any of those typical high-school rom-coms/dramas where guys make a bet to trick a girl, and boo’d at the screen, you’ll enjoy Sarah. It’s a twisted take on a classic plot that will make horror fans cheer. This is the version they were waiting on.

 

Cain and his best friend Finn are good kids that both have their heads screwed on straight. Cain took on a lot of responsibility after his dad’s death, and that definitely made him grow up a bit. Finn, too, has had his share of problems. They could be the male version of Mary-Sues if Polen hadn’t written in some believable flaws. But they’re not perfect, and that makes all the difference. Quick tempers, wicked tongues, and Finn’s desire to needle every one around him means that at any given time, someone’s probably thinking about punching him. Or Cain. Or both. The rest of the characters are appropriately likable or detestable. Except for Lindsay. She’s a bit of a non-entity.

 

I liked that the author made a few salient points in Sarah about the mindset towards sexual assault. There was more than one conversation or interaction when I just sat back in my chair and sighed after reading it. It was utterly realistic. Teenagers are, as a rule of thumb, very selfish individuals, and it seems like jocks in particular excel in this. They think they can get away with anything, and/or that the world revolves around them. It’s behavior that’s either never corrected, or not corrected until it’s too late.

 

Hasn’t recent events proven that if a boy can score several touchdowns per game, who cares how many girls he assaults, right? We all know they were asking for it anyways. Or if adult males make enough money, they can do anything they want to girls, because they believe they are more important than the girls are. And these types of beliefs are constantly getting reinforced in today’s society.

It’s disturbing and disgusting and Teri Polen shows the reader a path to douche-hood that hundreds of young men start down every day.

 

I did, however, have one huge problem with Sarah. Sarah, herself. Well, her dialogue to be specific. For the most part, I liked her. I liked seeing the change. I puzzled over what, exactly, was going on with her. Yes, I thought she was vengeance-crazed ghost thing, but she was a fun vengeance-crazed ghost thing. Until she opened her mouth. Pretty much every time she started talking, it was like someone just hit the ‘off’ button on my interest in the story.

 

I understand that her background means that we could expect a certain amount of dialogue that seemed unusual for her age range. I was fully willing to accept that. But Sarah presented with lines that went between disturbingly formal and super-villain monolog. Luckily, her talkative scenes appear in bursts, so for most of the story it’s really not an issue.

 

Sarah is a book that takes a bit to get going, but overall it’s an easy, enjoyable creepy read. I was definitely hooked fairly early on, and read the book in two bursts over two days. It comes in at just under 200 pages, so it’s not something that demands a lot of your time. If you like horror, but don’t like it too gory or scary, this will probably be a great choice. Teri Polen did a pretty solid job.

 

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book via Netgalley for review consideration

Source: www.scifiandscary.com/sarah-review
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review 2017-03-18 15:00
Stone Cold Bastards Review
Stone Cold Bastards - Jake Bible

Forget clawed mutants and moody men of steel. Jake Bible’s Grotesques are the heroes this world needs. Stone Cold Bastards is outright bloody fun. I love zombies, and I’m a fan of the author’s Z-Burbia series, but I think this was much better. It is a gust of fresh air blowing away some of the rancid post-apocalyptic rot pervading the genre.

 

Sometimes you just want to watch the world burn. If you cannot watch it burn, then you at least want to see geysers of blood and rib-cage battering rams. If none of those are available, chocolate will suffice. Luckily for me, I didn’t need to resort to chocolate. Jake Bible’s Stone Cold Bastards gave me all the head-bursting violence my blackened heart could want.

 

It also appealed to the teen in me. The one who discovered the show Gargoyles and sat in front of the TV for hours on end, watching the protectors of New York kick evil guy butt. Though you daren’t call the Stone Cold Bastards anything other than Grotesques, it’s clear there is a resemblance. Living stone attached to a sanctuary are moved halfway across the world to America and take up their positions as guardians.  These herculean heroes of various proportions are a bit cruder and less puppy-doggish than the Gargoyles I knew and loved, but they have an undeniable appeal. Especially the shotgun toting fairies with mouths that would make a sailor blush.

Though Stone Cold Bastards doesn’t exactly hit the ground running, by the time you’re halfway through the book, you’ve forgotten the real world exists. A literary treat that will have you on the edge of your seat, always ready to do a fist pump and cheer the Grotesques on. Morty and company burst to life in your mind’s eye. As tension builds and the violence becomes almost non-stop, it’s impossible to put down.

 

And Bible’s world in Stone Cold Bastards is a scary one. There are no zombies, but instead, there are demons. In this new post-apocalyptic world, the gates of Hell have opened and demons are queuing up to take their turns in the meat bags there were inheriting the earth. But human bodies can’t contain the festering rot of evil for long, and as the book opens, there’s only one Sanctuary of uncorrupted humanity left.  What makes this so scary, though, is that in this world all it takes is eye contact to become possessed. Bible takes something that we take for granted and twists it effortlessly into something with terrifying consequences.

 

By the time I was 30 pages from the end of Stone Cold Bastards, I was grinning like a loon. After it had finished, I went full on fangirl squealing and bugging my book-reviewing compadres to put it on their To-Read list immediately. I haven’t shown so much geekish excitement over a book since I read Andy Weir’s The Martian a few years ago.

 

Even a few days later, I still grin every time I think about the awesomeness that is Stone Cold Bastards. It’s an unashamedly campy, no-holds-barred post-apocalyptic thrill ride that will make you cheer. And maybe do a little Snoopy dance. (Or maybe that’s just me. What can I say? Some gals go gaga for romance, some go nuts for butt-kicking.)

Source: www.scifiandscary.com/stone-cold-bastards-review
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