logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Tee-Morris
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-15 06:49
An Eighties' Doctor in a Seventies' adventure
Doctor Who: Deep Blue - Mark Morris

In the aftermath of their experience on Seabase Four, the Doctor and his companions Tegan and Turlough arrive at a 1970s seaside town ready for a holiday. Instead they quickly find themselves entangled in an investigation into a gristly series of murders and violent episodes involving the local inhabitants. With UNIT on the scene, the Doctor joins their effort to unravel what is going on, quickly uncovering a fearsome new alien threat. But will the Doctor be able to figure out what is going on before the phenomenon overcomes the inhabitants of the town and then, the world itself?

By inserting the fifth Doctor into an adventure set during the third Doctor's era, Mark Morris's novel offers something a little different from most of its counterparts in the Past Doctor Adventures series. In some respects it's a study in contrasts, with a different Doctor and set of companions mixing with the characters familiar from a previous era. It's a mix that Morris pulls off well, in part because of the situation facing them. As others have noted the franchise is never stronger than when it is showing its roots. Here the gruesomeness of the violence and the body horror theme owes more than a little to the works of H. P. Lovecraft, with the countervailing force of the Doctor added to ensure a happy ending. While everything is a little too tidily wrapped up in its final pages considering what preceded them, this is nonetheless a solid entry in the Past Doctor Adventures series, one that offers the sort of premise that justifies why such novels are written.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-05 14:41
Incredible tale of love that begins in Auschwitz!
The Tattooist of Auschwitz - Heather Morris

The Tattooist of Auschwitz- Heather Morris, author; Richard Armitage, narrator.

This novel tells the story of Ludwig Eisenberg and Gisela Fuhrmannova. Essentially, it is a love story that defied the odds as it took place in the most unusual of places. Ludwig was known as Lale. In 1942, he was a prisoner in the Auschwitz Concentration Camp. His job was to tattoo incoming prisoners. He met Gita (Gisela), just a teenager of 17, on the day she was brought to him to have her tattoo redone because it had faded. For Lale, it seemed to be love at first sight, and he took it upon himself to protect her and insure her survival.  

Every Holocaust story brings with it a unique history of events, and this one is no different. It reminds the reader of the brutality and sadistic horror that the Germans, under Hitler’s Third Reich, systematically inflicted upon innocents who were guilty only of not being pure Aryans, although some were also marked because they held opposing political viewpoints. It is sad that fewer sane minds prevailed. Jews, gypsies, homosexuals, and the mentally ill were among those who were persecuted and systematically tortured, starved, worked to death or murdered outright so that Germany and Germans could enlarge their territory and prosper. The means justified their end goals.

 At first, I was drawn into the story because I thought it was the true story of Lale and Gita Sokolov (Lale changed his name from Eisenberg to Sokolov, his sister’s married name). As I read it and realized that the author had taken a great deal of poetic license in her presentation of events, I still enjoyed it, but not quite as a piece of history. I found it to be a compelling presentation of a romance that defied reality, and in some cases, some of the descriptions of events and experiences seemed to even defy credibility. I began to wonder how much of the story was based on fact and how much on the fiction that the author had to create when she put pen to paper. Since she did not hear actual conversations and had to rely on Sokolov’s memory and description of events, she surely had to embellish a great deal. There was so much that had to be filled in by her in order for her to write a cohesive and realistic story. Sometimes she was more successful than others as the narrative often went off into the world of a fairytale as characters that behaved with vicious brutality were often being presented with an occasional softer side. The author seemed to struggle to paint a positive side to the evil many exhibited, as if each villain had a redeeming trait to fall back on, in spite of their taking great pleasure in cruel, violent, evil behavior. To me, that softer side seemed to be far more of an anomaly and not the rule of thumb.

From the description of events, it appeared almost miraculous that Gita and Lela survived what they were forced to undergo. As with many survivors, a good deal of their ability to survive was because of luck and the occasional kindness of others. Yet, even the kindness of others seemed to have had a price, since nobody seemed to turn down any of the bribes offered. It seemed as if few did anything simply out of the goodness of their hearts, but rather they did it also for the reward they would reap.

The reader may well question if such a romantic relationship could have developed and thrived in a place filled with guards who relished and enjoyed their power, brutality and capacity for carnage. Still, the idea that there were some strong enough or lucky enough to survive through whatever means they could find comes through loud and clear, even when doing what was necessary meant sacrificing others to save themselves. Bargains were struck and compromises made in order to insure their survival. There were unusual friendships and choices that had to be made. Sometimes the line between collaborator and survivor was blurred.

No matter how many books you read, non-fiction or historic fiction, you can never full realize the complete extent of the Holocaust horror.

The narrator did a phenomenal job using perfect and appropriate accents, excellent expression and tone to present mood and the moment.

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-09-28 02:59
THE SQUIRE'S TALE by Gerald Morris
The Squire's Tale - Gerald Morris
Terence becomes the squire to Sir Gawain of King Arthur's Round Table.  As they travel on their quest, Terence becomes aware of gifts that he has and he uses them to help in their quest.  Sir Gawain becomes the Maiden's Knight. 
 
I enjoyed this book.  Some of the tales made me laugh out loud.  Some sobered me up.  I liked Terence and Sir Gawain.  Some of the characters they meet are a hoot.  I am going to track down more of the series.
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-09-12 23:22
The Ladybird Book of the Zombie Apocalypse
The Ladybird Book of the Zombie Apocalypse - Joel Morris,Jason Hazeley

Some people say civilisation after a zombie apocalypse will go back to The Stone Age. Nobody tidies up or collects the bins.

The electricity keeps going off.

There are dead bodies piled up in the streets.

It is actually more like the 1970s.

 

I guess, I'm just not the right audience for this book. Or really any book about zombies.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-08-03 00:37
Still Free
The Fireside Grown-Up Guide to the Hangover - Jason Hazeley

I've never had  a hangover, most likely because when I start to feel a bit silly, I stop drinking.  But this parody of Ladybird books is absolutely side splitting funny.

 

The cat, OMG, they put in the cat. 

 

And the names, the names.  And look at the letters before the author's name.

 

 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?