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review 2018-05-21 21:24
The Sound - Sarah Alderson

Trigger warning: Mention of rape/abuse of minors. Not implicit, but it is fairly important to the plot later on and not what the reader might be expecting.

 

I loved this book! Really loved it. Yes, it is practically a trashy teen romance with lots of cliches. I’m not denying that. However, I’d rather have something like this – which doesn’t need to try very hard to do what it sets out to do – than some kind of overambitious dystopian future with countless plot holes which falls apart in a few chapters. This book was consistent, and I liked that.

 

I enjoyed all of the characters to some extent, even the horrible ones. (They weren’t horrible all the time.) I also really loved the dynamics between the protagonist and her love interests more than naything. Ren was a great character to read about, and her interactions with Jesse and Jeremy were really, really cute. We had a pretty large cast and lots of directions to take the plot, and it felt like everyone was important in some way or another.

 

This book tries to make out that it’s something more than just teen romance, but…it isn’t, really. It’s about Ren finding love in America and there’s no two ways about it. There’s this subplot about a serial killer on the loose but strangely enough it’s mostly in the background whilst we focus on Ren making out with Jeremy, or Jesse, or whichever half-naked shirtless hot boy she’s enamoured with. Like, I was 2/3 of the way through the book before they were like “Oh shit, somebody else has been murdered. Ren, don’t you think you should be going home now before you get killed too?”

 

The story being this: Ren is working as a nanny in America for the summer. Here, she ends up getting romantically involved with two of the many hot guys who lives here, and…well, that’s the bulk of the book. There’s a serial killer in town who goes around murdering foreign nannies. Just like her. You can imagine how that works out.

 

It’s strange that the serial killer is mostly in the background the whole time and does almost NOTHING until the last chapter (in fact, I almost forgot he was there). He kills one girl in the entire book, and he doesn’t even do a good job of it. (She runs away and only dies of her wounds much later). The murder seemed almost like an afterthought, but I understand that wasn’t the focus of the book. It’s also not easy to guess who the killer is, because of the large cast and there’s so many characters that he could be.

 

There’s another subplot where one of the boys has been preying on underage girls. I say “preying”, but rape and abuse are involved (though in the past tense, that is, since it’s crimes he’s committed before). Nobody has filed any charges against him because he is very rich, has a lot of connections, and has a powerful lawyer that will protect him from any consequences.

 

This guy was actually more iconic than the fricking serial killer, I swear. You really wanted to see him thrown in prison for his crimes, he showed no remorse for anything he did and actually bragged about it. He also got more focus than the murderer did. If anything, he was a lot more interesting because he was one of the main characters, too. The scenes where they finally confront him are some of the most intense ones in the entire story.

 

Let’s take a look at the core of the book - Ren’s two love interests.

 

Love Interest Number One: Jeremy. He’s one of the first boys that Ren meets in the story, and is a total gentleman from the very beginning. He opens doors for her, compliments on her appearance all the time, takes her out to parties, makes her feel like the world revolves around her, makes out with her quite a bit and she’s always swooning over him. He sounds like the perfect boyfriend.

 

Love Interest Number Two: Jesse. Practically unapproachable “bad boy”. Most people avoid him because he has a reputation for being aggressive and violent. Prior to this book, he literally beat the shit out of another guy, landing him into hospital. He’s done time in juvenile prison as a result and also has a restraining order. Yeah, it’s that bad. But wait, he also plays guitar and sings in a band, and that makes him cooler. When Ren meets him for the first time, she finds him pretty intimidating already (but he also has his shirt off at the time and she can’t stop looking at his muscles).

 

Guess who she’s more attracted to? You think it’s the guy who treats her like she’s the centre of his world? The non-violent one?

 

Nope. Guess again. She goes for the violent bad boy who’s done time for assault. Seriously. What is wrong with her? Who in their right mind would do that?! Even her friends think she’s nut for going for him. He may be her second choice, but she gets attracted to him pretty fast.

 

However! We get a plot twist, and it turns out Mr Nice Guy was just using Ren to score points with another dickhead friend of his, so actually he’s no longer nice or a gentleman at all. It also turns out that Mr Violent Guy had a very good reason for wanting to put that other guy into hospital – but the fact remains that he still lost control and beat him to a pulp, meaning that he’s still very violent and our protagonist seems to forget that.

 

I guess if she’d read on in the book then she might have a reason for dating Jesse for plot reasons, but it still doesn’t make sense. The first time she meets Jesse, he literally looks like he wants to kill her…I mean, come on. This isn’t healthy. This just sounds like she’s attracted to really violent men. Good thing that the violent guy wasn’t actually that violent after all, but man, it just feels a bit off.

 

Even so, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It was romantic, it was cute, it had conflict – and just the right amount, too. It didn’t try to shove tons of drama and conflict down our throat like some YA books I could name, and it never made me feel bored at all. It was just right. There was a love triangle, obviously, but it actually made sense and didn’t feel forced.

 

I cannot tell you what a breath of fresh air it is in a YA novel to have a love triangle which actually feels like it BELONGS there. So far, I’ve only found this to be true in actual romance books which revolve around the romance and very little else.

 

I guess one criticism was that Ren was pretty similar to most female protagonists you find in a YA novel, and didn’t seem very unique. But you know what, I didn’t care. The romance was done well enough that it hardly seemed to matter. And I can’t fault the book for that.

 

All in all, I’ll give this a 4.

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review 2018-05-13 17:38
Flawed - Cecelia Ahern

I can't believe I sat through this entire book.

 

This is an example of what happens when an author tries to mimic a YA dystopian future, but doesn't flesh out the world enough. This is what happens when the author concentrates on all the wrong aspects completely. This is also what happens when the author puts in a very shoddy and superficial love triangle, has the main character make constantly bad decisions (despite being supposedly "clever" and "flawless", by the admissions of everyone else around her), and manages to cram far too much content into too few pages.

 

It's disappointing, really, because the first chapter was really well-written. The world seemed well thought-out, it was a novel idea, but by gods that's where it ended. About two-thirds of the way through the book, it felt like the author had no real idea what she was doing, and it just felt like an utter trainwreck by the end of it. With a sequel planned, no less.

 

Here's the setting, then: the book is set in a world where people are branded for being "Flawed". That's for making morally unethical decisions - be it lying, stepping out of line of society, stealing from society (that's also in a metaphorical sense, too, which leads to all sorts of trouble). It also includes helping out another Flawed person.

 

In this world, Flawed people are treated like subhumans. They are constantly monitored, are bound by a strict curfew, must stick to a diet of bland food, are despised by the rest of society, and no more than two of them are allowed to be together at one time.

 

Oh, and they are *physically* branded when they become flawed - the courts have a branding iron placed upon a part of their body, branding the letter F on their body, and they must wear a red armband so everyone knows they are Flawed.

 

The first chapter of the book begins with our main character witnessing one of their close friends being arrested for being Flawed, for no other reason than because she took her ailing mother to a different country to administer euthanasia to them. So far, so good. We can already tell that the justice system is fucked up. Tell me more.

 

Our main character is called Celestine North. She's a model member of society and is deemed to be near-perfect. Class-A student. 

 

What happens is that she sees an old man suffering on a bus, and helps him to his seat. An old man who is Flawed. By doing so, she has aided a Flawed person, and is deemed Flawed herself. And punished accordingly.

 

Despite being only 17, the major courts are very angry at her and have her branded 5 times at different places on her body (mainly because this becomes a very public case for the media, her father works in the media as well), especially when she refuses to admit that she was wrong.

 

This, uh, seems a bit excessive. 

Not to mention that the main villain, Judge Crevan, goes further and puts a sixth brand on her spine without anaesthetic, which is quite illegal and fucked up.

Basically, that chapter was very hard to read and is mainly about the main character being tortured excessively because that's apparently the only way the author can make this impact upon us.

 

This part also takes half of the book.

 

We already know this happens from the synopsis on the back of the book. By the time it happens, the book is half over. Uh...I'm sure you could have made your book a bit longer? It hardly feels like anything happened except Celestine's court case...

 

Somehow, the next half of the book concentrates on how Celestine finds a way to fight back against this tyrannical organisation. Almost as if she's hardly weakened at all from being branded six times and subjected to prejudice and torture. There's also a graphic bullying scene which is also very hard to read through.

 

You're telling me that this one character has been put through to hell and back and, without even a thought for her own safety or anything, immediately starts trying to bring down Judge Crevan for administering that sixth brand illegally - I mean we could have some more thoughts from herself on the matter, maybe? Just a little? It just felt like she did it for terms of plot alone...

 

Nothing was fleshed out enough. There's another Flawed boy called Carrick, and Celestine somehow falls for him. They say one sentence to each other. That's all. Yet she somehow spends most of the book searching him out because she feels a connection to him - she doesn't even KNOW him. it's ridiculous.

 

Which makes one love triangle after another - her boyfriend Art who mysteriously disappears after her trial, then comes back, then finds out she is going to a party with another boy, then throws a jealous fit and disappears (and he NEVER returns again). And then another love triangle with Art and her sister?? Are you serious? Why put him in the book at all?!

 

There are also so many plot holes because apparently criminals have a separate justice system of their own, and once they serve their time, they get to have a normal life. As in, they're not Flawed. It doesn't make sense. How can you make someone Flawed for helping another Flawed being, and say that makes them lower than a murderer? Why is the criminal not also Flawed? It makes no sense at all...

 

A lot of the book was also based on the political impact.

 

This is where the book really fails, because Celestine is made out to be this great paragon of a rebellion against the organisation, even though nothing like that actually happens. If the book had been twice as long and the rebellion happened near the end, then maybe it would have made sense...but barely anything is fleshed out at all! It's somehow fast-paced without anything happening.

 

Like, her teachers at school refuse to teach her because she's Flawed. The one teacher who agrees to home-school her turns out to have political motives for her to speak at some kind of gathering of the Flawed and it just gets ridiculous. I got the impression that the Flawed aren't allowed to have gatherings like this, but apparently it's legal? There wasn't enough detail about any of this at all.

 

Oh, and don't get me started on Celestine herself.

 

She makes so many bad decisions. She goes around poking her nose into all of these situations which would see her in tons of trouble, and gets almost nothing for her efforts. She is easily tricked into attending a party by one of her classmates (who then kidnaps her and locks her in a shed to try and make her miss her curfew). And she keeps trying to search for that one guy called Carrick for no real reason other than because he was her age and happened to be in the same cell as her. (Again, they never said a word to each other.)

 

I see a lot of people hating on Celestine, but she's not a terrible character. She's just extremely bland and not that compelling of a protagonist. Her sister, Juniper, is actually rebellious and seems to know what to do, and I'm surprised that she doesn't have a bigger part to play. Her granddad is cool too. It's like everyone except Celestine is a decent character.

 

Near the end, the story dives into ever-more ridiculous territory as Celestine somehow single-handedly starts a riot just by standing up to a police officer (just one), has a long extended conversation with her teacher's Flawed husband (he appears just one chapter before the end and yet talks for several pages about plot-important stuff, even though he is also really drunk at the time and I couldn't take anything seriously here), and finally we discover that the other judges are turning on Judge Crevan and are willing to help out Celestine if they join their side.

 

Like, all these people are so willing to help Celestine. It's not as if she's alone. All these political sides everywhere, except I don't care at all because the author has forgotten to flesh out all of the other parts of the world. It just doesn't add up at all. It's just a really badly-written dystopian future (it feels more like a dystopian present) and so little is left out.

 

I don't know why Celestine acts so stupidly throughout the book, yet everyone excuses her actions and says what a clever girl she is because she studied mathematics. (The teacher's husband tells her that she can use mathematics to work out how to get out of her situation. I did mathematics at university. He's an idiot.) I don't know why the author chose to delve into the political side and leave out everything that could have been interesting.

 

I don't understand the reason for the terribly-written love triangle, or the love interest that never appears until the end, or the boyfriend who disappears in the second half of the book, or the desire to make the villains so ridiculously evil and sadistic that I can't take anything seriously anymore. 

 

By the end of it, I had come to the conclusion that this book is so bad that it's good. And good god, I am not reading the sequel.

 

 

 

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review 2018-05-12 12:14
A Touch of Evil by nyxocity
A Touch of Evil - nyxocity

An extremely dark J2 fanfic in the style of Dexter. Jensen Ackles is a forensic pathologist and serial killer of his fellow murderers. His sister Daneel is a police detective. His life is overturned when he comes into contact with trauma surgeon Jared Padalecki. 
An accomplished piece of writing, not for the squeamish.

Image by monkeyJade
description
'Jensen shouldn't… but he wants. Fuck, he wants. Want such as he has never known, wrapped in wonder and dripping with sin, straining at the end of its chains.'

Source: archiveofourown.org/works/12546612
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review 2018-05-12 02:03
ARC Review: Hawk In The Rowan by Sam Burns
Hawk In The Rowan - Sam Burns

Oh, this was so, so good, y'all. This is the 2nd book in the arc for Devon Murphy, head of the town council, and Wade Hunter, deputy sheriff and his mate. While this might be readable as a standalone, I don't recommend you do. You'd miss out on their beginning, and you'd miss out on this quirky, wonderful, amazing town full of supernatural beings who all support each other and try to protect each other from harm of outsiders who would use and abuse them, simply for what they are.

In the very first book of this trilogy of trilogies, we got to meet Devon and Wade for the first time and watched them enter a romantic relationship, amid fighting a threat to the town and Devon coming into his own as he learns about his abilities, being Fae. That book left them with a strong HFN, but I knew that Devon struggled a bit - not only with his newfound abilities and responsibilities, but also with his inner voice that tells that he doesn't want to be tied down, and that he's not what they all see in him.

Now that the danger from the first three books has apparently passed, Devon wonders if he'll stay. Whether he should stay. Whether he should make a big commitment to Wade. Whether that is too much, too fast. Whether he's really supposed to stay, he, the wanderer.

We see him interact with Salli (a siren), Wade's brother Jesse, who's Devon's best friend, Fletcher and his mate, Jesse's mate Sean, Helena McKenzie who still treats Devon like he's dirt beneath her feet, for reasons we find out inside the pages, the vampire Cassidy, and the wise Oak - all the characters from the first trilogy make an appearance again and further the plot in their own way.

And then danger visits Rowan Harbor again.

I continue to be amazed by this author's prowess. For most of this book, I was at the edge of my seat, breathless and clutching my Nook white-knuckled. The tension builds slowly, like the blizzard coming, and when the weather unleashes its might, so does the danger, and Devon is right in the middle.

The symbolism is evident - as Devon fights the beast in the woods, he's also fighting the beast within him, the one that doubts, that fears, that wonders. And as he is victorious over the beast without, he also slays the one within. As he saves the towns folk (not on his own, of course), so he saves not only his own heart but Wade's too. And as the beast falls, so does Devon's doubt that he truly is exactly where he's meant to be.

And finally, Devon sees, really sees, what's been in front of him all along. Amazing what happens when you conquer your fears and speak your truth.

Obviously, this isn't the end, and I expect book 5 to pick up where we left off with Jesse Hunter and Sean Anderson as well as a new danger to the town, where all of our new friends have to come together to save the day.

This is such a fantastic series, and I cannot recommend it highly enough. Run, don't walk, to get yourself a copy of these books. They are well worth your time.



** I received a free copy of this book from the tour organizer in exchange for an honest review. **

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-05-07 05:47
Don't trust booktubers, common sense media, goodreads choice awards. Don't even trust this review.
A Court of Frost and Starlight - Sarah J. Maas

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One more time I want to warn readers, teachers and parents that this series isn't YOUNG ADULT. Distrust any booktuber, goodreads reviewer/editor, and "prestigious" site that tells you otherwise.

If you are a teacher or librarian Distrust the information on genre and recommended age that comes from the publisher Bloomsburry Children's. Also distrust Kirkus reviews, Booktubers and bookbloggers who say this is Young adult, Common sense media and The Goodreads choice awards for Young adult. More on that at the bottom of my review.

THIS SERIES IS EROTIC/NEW ADULT NOT YOUNG ADULT. If reviewers tell you this series isn't new adult they're lying through their teeth. The result of those lies is that books with erotic content are currently labeled as CHILDREN'S BESTSELLERS or recommended to 12 YO readers.

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Is the author and publisher of this book really selling books with erotic/explict content to young kids without warnings? In the USA most copies of this series come with no warning of explicit content. I applaud writers that write erotic content, just don't sell it to young children. This is from booktopia, an Australian retailer; It recommends the most erotic book of the series to readers AS YOUNG AS 12.

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That's why you shouldn't trust publishers to give the correct information on genre and recommended age in YA books.

**Don't trust MY review either**

**Do your own research and tell me why this series shouldn't be considered PARANORMAL EROTICA, PARANORMAL NEW ADULT, FANTASY ROMANCE or ADULT ROMANTIC FANTASY. **

You can start by finding out:
How old the main characters are?

I'll tell you, but don't believe me, find out for/by yourself.
Protagonist is 20-21 (like Anastasia Still from fifty shades of grey)
Her sisters are even older
the rest of the cast is several hundreds year old

How explicit the sex is

You can find that information on my A COURT OF MIST AND FURY REVIEW updates. My ACOMAF review hasn't been censored by goodreads employees yet as my TOWER OF DAWN(another new adult book by this same author)review was. My Tower of dawn review has 273 likes so it should appear in the main page of reviews. Goodreads is hiding it. That sucks because it's the responsibility of parents (not of Goodreads, not of the publishers and authors) to find out about the content of the EXPENSIVE books they buy for their underage kids. But how are they going to find that information when so many booktubers, common sense media and Goodreads members are hiding it?

You can also find the information about erotic content of this series on the american hardcover version of a court of mist and fury.
Pages 21, 22 [A faery woman is descriptively fingered by someone different than the hero, then she has descriptive sex, then oral, descriptions of the fluids and the nudity and the action in vivid detail. (hide spoiler)]

Pages 471, 472, 473, 474. 475
[A faery woman is fingered to orgasm by the hero (different guy from the pages 21-22), partial nudity, but this scene takes a quite few pages and it's an erotic scene, not just a sex scenes, but the purpose seems to be to be to turn on the reader. (hide spoiler)]

Pages 530, 531, 532, 533, the orgasm that shatters the mountains: [a pair of lovers heroine and hero have sex including oral, vidid description of the action, use of the word "cock" (hide spoiler)]

Pages 538 and 539 [vivid descrption of oral (fellatio):P but they call it licking LOL. (hide spoiler)]

DISCLAIMER AND TRIGGERS WARNINGS:

♣ IF YOU DON'T LIKE READING EROTIC/EXPLICIT CONTENT and don't tell me that you can skip the sex scenes, Most of us don't pay full hardcover price for skiping half the book ;)
[kidding, only A COURT OF MIST AND FURY book two is really erotica marketed as YA, the rest of the series is still explicit but not erotic (hide spoiler)]

♣ IF YOU THINK YOUNG ADULT IS A GENRE THAT SHOULD REMAIN CLEAN

♣ IF YOU ARE 12-17 YO WHO DOESN'T LIKE TO READ EXPLICIT SEX SCENES

♣ IF YOU DON'T LIKE LOVE TRIANGLES And MULTIPLE MALE LOVE INTERESTS
Book 1 we have a love triangle: Tamlin vs Rhysand [(there was a third male who Feyre was sleeping with, but it was just a fuck buddy who was engaged to marry OW)> winner: Tamlin (hide spoiler)]
Book 2 We have a love triangle: Rhysand vs. Tamlin but it's really uneven [for a while it seems as though another high lord might create a love geometry but didn't happen. EXPLICIT SEX SCENES of heroine with both love interests: winner Rhysand (hide spoiler)]
Book 3: NO LOVE TRIANGLE! [Feyre and Rhys remain together, but there are other love triangles around and Rhys proposes a Male-Male-Female threesome to Feyre. Maybe he was joking, either way her reaction was unnecessarily enthusiastic for a woman who has already been sexually involved with 3 different men in the series and who is basically a newlywed. FeyRhys is still in their honeymoon period so why are they already joking about threesomes? (hide spoiler)]

♣ IF YOU DON'T LIKE ABUSIVE LOVE INTERESTS AND ABUSIVE WOMEN
-Tamlin love interest of book 1? ABUSIVE!
-Rhys, secondary love interest of book 1 and [ primary love interest of books 2 and 3? Rhys tortured the heroine(there was a reason, though) (hide spoiler)]ABUSIVE!
- The sisters? Everyone talks about how Tamlin should apologize. When will the sisters apologize? [ Feyre's elder sisters let Feyre hunt for the family from a very early age, but they were always there reaping the benefits of Feyre's effort. When Feyre was going through an abusive relationship they kept receiving money from Feyre's abuser and didn't bother to find out how she was (hide spoiler)] ABUSIVE!

♣IF YOU DON'T LIKE WHEN sexual assault victims ARE THROWN UNDER THE BUS TO MOVE THE PLOT FORWARD
It happens so much on New adult and adult literature (game of thrones, the girl with the dragon tatoo, the second book of the outlander series) a sexual assault victim gets the "oh-you-were-raped?- don't- bitch- about- it- and- move- forward treatment. So many books trivialize the worst aspect of PTSD and sexual assault and try to "sovle it" either with revenge or the magic romantic relationship that will make everything go away. Or the experiences just get ignored and brush aside! This happens to Mor, a secondary character in the 3rd book who is a rape survivor when [ she's forced to work along with her attacker and the one who puts her through that was the hero of the story! (hide spoiler)]To be fair, I can understand the circumstances, doesn't mean I have to like that kind of story line, especially when that's something that good editing could have taken care of. That kind of disrespect for rape was unneccessary IMO. It didn't move the plot forward and it's out of character for Rhys to act like that. I love Rhys and didn't like the way SJM made him act.


My ratings for the series so far
♣ A Court of Thorns and Roses ACOTAR 3/5 because abusive relationships, false advertising (it's new adult dishonestly marketed as young adult) and love triangle. My review is currently censored and hidden from the third page of review. It should appear somewhere between page 2 and 3.
♣ A Court of Mist and Fury ACOMAF 4/5 because I didn't appreciate the explicit sex scene with OM, but I highly recommend this book to my friends who don't mind safety issues and like explicit scenes in slow-burn-romance. This book is EROTICA (according to the goodreads description of the genre) marketed as YA.
♣A Court of Wings and Ruin 2.5/5 because poor editing, f bombs, repetitiveness, unnecessary sex scenes and dangerous messages. No, glorifying revenge and abusive women isn't female empowerment. No, in most marriage it isn't always the woman's choice, it's always the choice of both of them.

Sources of my pictures:

AMAZON CANADA CHILDREN'S BOOKS ADVENTURE

AMAZON CANADA CHILDREN'S BOOKS FANTASY

AMAZON AUSTRALIA CHILDREN'S BOOKS LOVE

Booktopia A COURT OF MIST AND FURY RECOMMENDED AGES


WHY YOU SHOULDN'T TRUST BOOKTUBERS AND THE YA GOODREADS CHOICE AWARDS REGARDNG THE CONTENT OF THIS BOOK?
Because, for the vast majority of booktubers have failed so far to mention that this book series contains erotic/explicit content in their booktube reviews even though they always discuss "young adult books". It could be unintentionally. It could be intentionally. The reason doesn't matter. They're contributing to the false advertising.

A few booktubers are being published or aspire to be published by the same IMPRINT of this new adult series. Others booktubers and bookbloggers seem to want good relationships with the publishing industry. They won't say anything that can hurt the marketing agenda of the big publishing houses. Note: Bookables, Benji Alderson and Polandbananas have mentioned this series is new adult , so of course a lot of booktubers are somehow honest . Distrust only the ones who call this series young adult.

On the other hand, The goodreads choice awards editors ignored the shelving system when they selected the categories for the goodreads choice awards last year. In the goodreads feedback group they told me that's how editors select categories: based on shelving.



At the time of the awards this series was shelved primarily as fantasy and romance by GR users, but still the editors made it compete on the young adult category. Not in romance, not in fantasy, in young adult.



This review isn't meant to discouraging people from reading/buying the book. On the contrary. I'm inviting you to read this series if you don't have problems with sexual content and abusive relationships. Despite all the problems I have with the false advertising I enjoyed the trilogy . But again I'm warning you

♣ Don't trust the information that you see on Goodreads, Common sense media. and booktube. Do your research.

Life is too short and TBR piles are too big to just ignore the kind of information that can help us decide what we will read next. Goodreads shouldn't try to hide that information.

For a series that is supposedly about women's choices, when Goodreads, Booktubers and Publishers hide this information from young girls they are taking away their right to decide when or if they will read erotic content. Not to mention they're contributing to the book being sold in the Children's section of multiple retailers.

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