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Search tags: Zombies
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text 2018-09-25 20:27
Reading progress update: I've read 25%.
Feed - Mira Grant

Sigh. Too many info dumps. I do like how the zombie thing came to be though. The world building is just a bit rough and it's taking me out of the story.


Shaun kind of sucks.

"I never wanted to be Lois Lane, girl reporter, even though I dressed like her for Halloween one year. I wanted to be Edward R. Murrow, facing down corruption in the government."

I am offended on Lois's behalf. 

 

The world cheered when Dr. Alexander Kellis announced his cure for the common cold. I’ve never had a cold, thanks to Dr. Kellis, but I understand they were pretty annoying; people didn’t enjoy spending half their time sniffling, sneezing, and getting coughed on by total strangers. Dr. Kellis and his team rushed through testing at a pace that seems criminal in retrospect, but who am I to judge? I wasn’t there.

I swear I read a sci-fi book about this (curing the common cold) and people were left like sterile beings. That's just to say curing the common cold never works out in sci-fi books. 

 

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review 2018-09-25 18:32
Review of "My Life as a White Trash Zombie" (White Trash Zombie, #1) by Diana Rowland
My Life as a White Trash Zombie - Diana Rowland

This reader's personal opinion, ©2018, all rights reserved, not to be quoted, clipped or used in any way by goodreads, Google Play, amazon.com or other commercial booksellers* 

 

No apocalypse, dystopia, Walking Dead type of zombies here. More along the lines of a werewolf bite creating more werewolves. Our world, our time — and zombies just like us so long as they get plenty of human brains to eat (vague mention of something about the enzymes ). Start turning more into movie-usual shambling disintegrating zombies if starved. Also not as slapstick as titles and covers indicate.

 

I'd been curious about these for a while seeing what everyone was saying on my book site feeds. Luckily, I got into the main character and enjoyed Angel's viewpoint on everything that was happening to her post-being-a-zombie. She had both a sense of humor and a serious side about everything going on despite a life that screened stereotypical white trash: high school dropout, dysfunctional and abusive home life, drug problems, wring crowd, etc.

 

I love the story arc and that becoming a zombie meant she thought about and fixed some aspects (well, sort of no drug problems now because don't work on zombies except now she's addicted to brains and safe from abusers with new zombie strength). She did come across way younger than the 21 the book said she was. She didn't ditch everyone she knew, even the ones clearly bad for her.

 

Overall, a very funny book. Too easy on how drug addiction and abuse handled and the ending a little hokey, but I'm looking forward to the next in series.  I like being in Angel's head and watching her growth


*©2018.  All rights reserved except permission is granted to author or publisher (except Penumbra Publishing) to reprint/quote in whole or in part. I may also have cross-posted on Libib, LibraryThing, and other sites including retailers like kobo and Barnes and Noble. Posting on any site does not grant that site permission to share with any third parties or indicate release of copyright.  

 

Ratings scale used in absence of a booklikes suggested rating scale:

★★★★★ = All Time Favorite 
★★★★½ = Extraordinary Book. Really Loved It.
★★★★☆ = Loved It.
★★★½☆ = Really Liked.
★★★☆☆ = Liked.
★★½☆☆ = Liked parts; parts only okay. Would read more by author.
★★☆☆☆ = Average.   Okay. 
★½☆☆☆ = Disliked or meh? but kept reading in hopes would improve.
★☆☆☆☆ = Loathed It. Possibly DNF and a torturous read.
½☆☆☆☆ = So vile was a DNF or should have been. Cannot imagine anyone liking.  (Might also be just an "uploaded" word spew or collection that should not be dignified by calling itself a "published book." If author is going batshit crazy in the blogosphere over reviews -- I now know why they are getting bad reviews.  Or maybe author should take remedial classes for language written in until basic concepts like using sentences sink in. Is author even old enough to sign a publishing contract or do they need a legal guardian to sign for them?)

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text 2018-09-25 16:19
Reading progress update: I've read 15%.
Feed - Mira Grant

Honestly, not feeling this one. I don't have a lot of energy to look for a new book though for the square, so I may just suck it up and continue.

 

I think what is taking me out of the story is we have zombies, it's the year 2030 something, and apparently bloggers are still a thing. The MC, Georgia also known as George, runs a blog alongside her brother Shaun, and their friend Buffy. Apparently the world as we know it is still about the news and ratings. George, Shaun, and Buffy get a chance to cover a Presidential race and this means huge ratings and a win for the three of them. 

 

There's also some shadiness with George and Shaun's adopted parents. They care only about ratings it seems and they adopted these two to look more wholesome or something. 


I don't know what to say about this book besides I feel mostly confused. There are also way too many info dumps about the science behind the zombies/virus and how ratings/bumps work and what bloggers are called. 

 

 

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text 2018-09-24 23:26
Reading progress: 89%.

 

From:

My Life as a White Trash Zombie - Diana Rowland  My Life as a White Trash Zombie - Diana Rowland  

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review 2018-09-24 23:07
Ruin and Rebirth by Michael Whitehead
Ruin and Rebirth - Michael Whitehead

Note: While this is Book 3 in the series, it works mostly OK as a stand alone. The series is worthy, so I recommend starting at Book 1 for entertainment value.

Lucia and the archer Vitas have made it this far and they aren’t giving up! These were my two favorite characters from Book 1 and it’s good to see they have survived the zombie plague to play important roles in Book 3. It’s been a few months since the end of Book 2, but our little band of heroes is on a nebulous quest. Lucia has gotten better and better with weapons and avoiding zombies. She pulls her own weight while also noting how much she’s stepped outside the typical Roman woman’s role in society. These are extraordinary circumstances and they require shields, weapons, and some common sense. The men in her group are all for it because this is a fight for humanity. No room for shrinking violets here!

Meanwhile, back in Rome proper, some few humans have managed to survive by scavenging for supplies and hiding from zombies. There are a few brave folks that ban together to rescue those that can be brought back to one central location. Garrick, a butcher, is a lead character in these scenes. He’s smart, careful, and becomes a major force in the fight to reclaim Rome.

Flavia and her husband do much to bring the survivors of Rome together. I really like Flavia because she’s competent, gets stuff done, and yet sticks to the societal boundaries of the time and location. She doesn’t get to pick up a weapon but she does use her wits. She shows bravery in the toughest moments and appreciates what others risk to keep her and others safe.

Back in Germania, Vitus and Lucia keep moving their band north. Regulus is at the heart of something, having visions of the source of the plague. Vedus (spelling?) has been showing Regulus a temple via these visions. So there’s this supernatural quality to the story and as it progresses, Regulus becomes more and more aware of what might await them. Lucia and Vitus do everything they can to get the weakening Regulus north.

The Roman Empire was huge and contained many cultures. This series and this book have nods to that. There’s a young Chinese lad and the Persian warrior Harkour. And the Spaniard (Gallus, if I recall correctly). I love that the Roman Empire isn’t white washed in this series.

The final conclusion to the tale is carried out on two fronts: the truth of Regulus’s visions and back in the City of Rome where frenzied zombies threaten to eradicate human life. It was only in the last moments that I realized what a toll this plague would take. It pulled on my heart strings, being both horrible and beautiful at once. The concept of sacrifice is well captured in these scenes. It’s a worthy ending to a worthy series. 5/5 stars.

The Narration: Terry Self is his usual outstanding. Every character was distinct and the ladies sounded like women. I especially appreciate how he kept Vitus and Vedus very clearly delineated from each other as it would be easy for a listener to mix up these names if the narration was sub-par. His true gift this time is working with all the emotions of the characters. They are seeing their society fall in short order and so much has already been lost. I also liked his various accents. The pacing was perfect and there were no technical issues with the recording. 5/5 stars.

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