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text 2018-05-23 02:29
Summer Reading List 2018
Pete Rose: An American Dilemma - Kostya Kennedy
First Love, Last Rites - Ian McEwan
The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket - Edgar Allan Poe,Richard Kopley
Leviathan - Scott Westerfeld,Keith Thompson
Three Tall Women - Edward Albee
Homegoing - Yaa Gyasi
The Tenant of Wildfell Hall - Anne Brontë

I'm well behind pace in my reading this year. I always say I "average" a book a week, for 52 or so books a year, but I usually exceed that by a fair margin. This year, I'm quite slow. Only 16 so far - even though at least two were "doorstops."

 

So two weeks ago, when I realized I hadn't even considered my summer reading list, I was worried. But when I finally sat down to compose it, the list came flowing straight out. Easy-peasy, less than an hour's contemplation, for sure.

 

The fact I've been using the same nine categories for years, I'm sure, helps considerably. Three books for each month of summer. Things that make me happy and better-rounded. Plenty of room left for serendipity and other titles. Here goes:

The list.

 

1. A baseball book - "Pete Rose: An American Dilemma" by Kostya Kennedy. Reading a baseball book - fiction or non-fiction - is a summer tradition. Thanks, Casey Awards for the ready-made list. 

 

2. A Michael Chabon book - "Pops: Fatherhood in Pieces." This was both tough and incredibly easy. I've read all of Chabon's books, except some very hard to get screenplays and graphic novels. Luckily, he has a new book out this month. It's an anthology of his magazine essays, in the mode of "Maps and Legends," but it's better than none!

 

3. An Ian McEwan book - "First Love, Last Rites." I've read all of McEwan's recent stuff, so I have to reach way back into the Ian Macabre phase, which I like less, but it needs to be done. At least there's a new McEwan adaptation coming out in theaters soon.

 

4. A Neglected Classic - "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket," Edgar Allen Poe's only novel. Not one that was really on my radar, but read entry five for more "why." 

 

5. A recent "big" book - "Pym" by Mat Johnson. I have the opportunity to hear Johnson read in June, and I think it's time to read his novel, inspired by Poe's, as listed above. 

 

6. A YA book - "Leviathan" by Scott Westerfeld. A steampunk, World War I revisionist novel? Yes, please. 

 

7. A Play - "Three Tall Women" by Edward Albee. It's in revival on Broadway right now with Laurie Metcalf. You know I won't make it to Manhattan, so I'd better finally read it.

 

8. A Recommendation from a Friend - "Homegoing" by Yaa Gyasi. My friend, Laura, suggested it. She didn't have to suggest very hard, because I was already meaning to read it. And she loaned me her copy!

 

9. The book I didn't read from last year's list - "The Tenant of Wildfell Hall" by Anne Bronte. There's one every year. This year's will probably be the Chabon, just because it's new and might be hard to acquire through library means.

 

Well, that's it. I'll post a list on the booklikes list app. Will you read along with me? What's on your list for Summer '18? 

 

-cg

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photo 2018-04-19 18:08
The Complete Stories and Poems - Edgar Allan Poe

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow;—vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore—

 


I’m almost finished reading Fahrenheit 451, and while that little tidbit may seem wholly unrelated, bear with me. As many of you know, books are illegal in Bradbury’s story, but there’s a part when Guy reads a poem to his wife and her friends, and one of her friends starts sobbing without knowing why. They hadn’t felt anything real in so long, if ever - everything that was shoved down their throats was fake happiness they thought they needed. But hearing a poem caused her to cry uncontrollably, and Guy began to doubt that books should ever be brought back to light. That maybe happiness was better, even if it was shallow. Guy seems to be learning his own depths at this point, and his hesitation really struck me. I’ve always found the sorrowful or the tragic to be the most breathtaking. Like Poe, for example. There would never be a moment when I thought that sorrow should be hidden from the world. And I’m so glad that works like Poe’s exist. Could you imagine a world without authors like him? Or ANY authors, for that matter? 


If I’m rambling, I apologize! Fahrenheit 451 is just so provoking and relevant - read it, if you haven’t yet! And PS, HBO is making a new flick of it to be released next month

Source: getfictional.com
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quote 2018-03-06 16:59
W moim dziwacznie zboczonym życiu nie doznawałem nigdy uczuć z serca pochodzących i namiętności moje zawsze wylęgały się w mrokach rozumu.
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review 2017-11-24 23:01
Great adaptation format
Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe - Stacy King,Edgar Allan Poe

Disclaimer: reviewing eARC via NetGalley

 

I've read all of the stories in this volume in the past, but I found it far easier to appreciate them in this format. The language is preserved well, but breaking it up into multiple panels helped me slow down and appreciate the way it builds. In some cases, just the illustration helped clarify obscure language. Madness and murder benefit from eerie distortions and heavy use of screentone, building a visual background to the dark stories. The art stays on the clean and appealing side of commercial manga, though, not tipping too far into the horrific, so this could be a good way to introduce kids, as well as older readers ,to the work of Poe.

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text 2017-10-31 23:24
My October 2017
Miraculous - Die geheime Superheldin - Barbara Neeb,Katharina Schmidt
Just One of the Boys - Leah and Kate Rooper
Approximately Yours (North Pole, Minnesota) - Julie Hammerle
Miraculous - Der dunkle Doppelgänger - Barbara Neeb,Katharina Schmidt
Blutzeuge - Tess Gerritsen
Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe - Stacy King,Edgar Allan Poe
Der magische Faden - Tom Llewellyn,Nina Dulleck,Ilse Layer
Süßer Ruf des Todes (Reihenfolge der Eve Dallas-Krimis, Band 29) - J.D. Robb,Uta Hege
Miraculous - Die geheime Superheldin - 4 stars
Just One of the Boys - 4 stars
Approximately Yours - 5 stars
Miraculous - Der dunkle Doppelgänger - 5 stars
Blutzeuge - 5 stars
Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe - 4 stars
Der magische Faden - 4 stars
Süßer Ruf des Todes - 5 stars

 

Favorite book(s) of the month: Just One of the Boys, Approximately Yours, Blutzeuge, Süßer Ruf des Todes

 

Books started this month but haven't finished yet: Elias & Laia - Die Herrschaft der Masken, Der Fledermausmann, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

 

So this month, I decided to just stop being an adult and completely dive into my books. Real life just was way too much these last few months, I needed that mental break. So I just read all the books. All of them. This is an insane number for me. Also, the quality, I seriously enjoyed all these books.


(I'm doing this wrap up super early. Look at me, having my shit together for once!!!)

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