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text 2018-08-08 11:53
Keto Belly Burn - Use This For Your Unwanted Weight

The most effective foods Keto Belly Burn for fat loss are "simple" foods that work with your body instead of against it. Simple foods are the foods humans ate over millions of years of evolution and they include things like lean meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds. If you must have grain foods (e.g. breads, pastas, and cereals) always, always choose 100% whole-grain versions. Of course you must avoid all refined sugars and flours. Include a balanced diet that has all the nutrients Keto Belly Burn  - fats, proteins, lean meat, vitamins, soy etc. and include as many colored vegetables as you can. Each color has a different nutrient. Your body needs each and every one of these for its health, so don't let it starve by cutting out items from your diet that you think are bad for you.


Are you still looking for more incredible Keto Belly Burn ways to earn cash? Then these easy make money online tips will surely help you out! If these tips will not work on you then I don't know if there are any more tips such as these that could answer all your money problems in no time Weight Loss at all!


That's where ab exercises come into play. Performing key abdominal exercises is a key to developing the trunk region to the fullest Keto Belly Burn. Many people are looking for the illusive lower ab exercise or performing exercises they believe to target a certain region but are really working the wrong muscle. Having abs is as simple as doing the right core exercises. That will be part of the 6 months of ab training at the end of this series.

 

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Source: www.healthytalkzone.com
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review 2018-03-18 00:38
The 10-Day Bellow Slimdown
The 10-Day Belly Slimdown: Lose Your Belly, Heal Your Gut, Enjoy a Lighter, Younger You - Dr. Kellyann Petrucci MS ND
Title: The 10-Day Belly Slimdown
Author: Kellyann Petrucci
Publisher: Harmony; 1 edition
Reviewed By: Arlena Dean
Rating: Five
Review:

"The 10-Day Belly Slimdown: Lose Your Belly, Heal Your Gut, Enjoy a Lighter, Younger You by Kellyann Petrucci

My Thoughts....

After reading "The 10-Day Belly Slimdown I found the book sounds good with the book offering a simple 'daily meal plans, batch cooking tips, recipes to make meal easy to make, 80 delicious new recipes, and with a sensible maintenance plan. However, I do wish there were photos. I will say this 10-Day program sounds somewhat easier than the 21-Day program. If this will help ones to lose weight, help with ones blood work and to feel good what can be better than this? Getting ones cholesterol lowered is another great thing. However, I think it is important to know that it is not just a weight loss plan but a 'life style choice.' If you need help with food cravings then there is information in this read that is there to help for you. Be ready for a super easy plans that are there to help with bloating and fat. I will say the chicken and beef broth sound good. So, if you are looking for a new way of eating healthy and possibility loosing weight then this read would be for you with a lots of excellent tools [tons of resources] to use and in the end feeling good and looking ones best.

I enjoyed reading through 'The 10-Day Belly Slimdown' where I found the read a easy read to understand by this well known Doctor Kellyann Petrucci.

I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

 
 
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review 2017-12-03 08:25
Emile Zola’s The Belly of Paris: Celebration of Food or Satire?
The Belly of Paris - Ernest Alfred Vizetelly,Émile Zola

Les Halles in Paris—do you know it? Unless you’re into a bit of French history, you may not. It doesn’t exist anymore, demolished in 1969/70, its centennial year. It was a huge market, much of it housed in at least ten pavilions of glass and iron designed by Victor Baltard. Plus a big domed central pavilion that later became the Bourse de Commerce, the French stock exchange. Everything you could imagine to be edible could be found there, from fish, meats, and cheeses to fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

View of Les Halles in Paris taken from Saint Eustache upper gallery, c. 1870-80 (colour litho) by Benoist, Felix (1813-1896); Private Collection, out of copyright interior of dome

Les Halles has been called the “belly” of Paris, a name owed to Emile Zola’s novel Le Ventre de Paris (The Belly of Paris), published in 1873, three years after the opening of Les Halles. It should be no surprise that the novel contains descriptions of the market’s offerings. Descriptions that are some of the lushest I’ve read and probably in greater profusion than in any other book. For those who love food, it’s a joy to read.

But the book isn’t just about the bounty (or glut) of the products the market yields. It’s, in fact, just one in a series of twenty books—maybe the largest of all time—chronicling the lives of the Rougon-Macqquart family. According to Brian Nelson’s Introduction to The Belly of Paris (Oxford World’s Classics). Zola intended the series to

“illustrate the influence of heredity and environment on a wide range of characters and milieus.”

Sounds like a psychological study (here’s another of another Victorian character)? Sure does, but in the form of fiction. The cycle or series places various members of this particular family at the core of each of the twenty books. In The Belly of Paris, that Rougon-Macquart is Lisa, the plump and beautiful, rosy, self-assured woman married to Quenu, the owner of a successful charcuterie. While her relatively simple-minded fat husband labors in the kitchen to make the products for the store, La Belle Madame reigns behind the counter.

The book, is so much more complex than it may appear on the surface and, like any great piece of art, each reader can potentially see in it something that’s unique to her particular perception. For me, one character that stood out is the young artist Claude, Lisa’s nephew, who returns as the main character in a subsequent book, L’Œuvre (The Masterpiece). He wanders around the markets in early mornings, admires the luscious colors of the produce and imagines painting them.

Claude may have been modeled after post-Impressionist Paul Cezanne, Zola’s friend from their childhood in Aix-en-Provence. Besides being a painter, Claude is something of a philosopher—a mouthpiece for Zola—as he theorizes about fat people swallowing up the thin ones. This clash of Fat vs. Thin is, in fact, a major theme throughout the whole book.

While the Fat prevails in Les Halles, some thin people do live around there. Aside from Claude, there is Florent, the unlikely hero. He brought up his younger half-brother, the fat charcutier Quenu who is devoted to him. Having escaped his exile in the prison of Cayenne (Devil’s Island) where he suffered constant deprivation of food, company, and sensory stimulation, you might think Florent would fatten himself up and thrive in Les Halles. But the abundance of food doesn’t make him salivate. It makes him want to puke. He’s a conscience-ridden ascetic who spends his hours thinking and writing about how to change things for the better. He threatens the status quo and the things that Lisa values. She becomes his silent, but powerful, enemy. In the end, Zola describes her:

She was a picture of absolute quietude, of perfect bliss, not only untroubled but lifeless, as she bathed in the warm air. She seemed, in her tightly stretched bodice, to be still digesting the happiness of the day before; her plump hands, lost in the folds of her apron, were not even outstretched to grasp the happiness of the day, for it was sure to fall into them. And the shop window beside her seemed to display the same bliss. It too had recovered; the stuffed tongues lay red and healthy, the hams were once more showing their handsome yellow faces,

The Belly of Paris is just as much about the characters—as richly-drawn as the produce—that inhabit Les Halles as it is about its life-giving (for the fat) but also nauseating (for the thin) bounty.

For a long time, French cuisine has been celebrated all over the world for its superior quality and craftsmanship. Every chef worth her salt wanted to master French culinary techniques. French gastronomy has been such an institution that UNESCO declared it an intangible cultural heritage in 2010, citing it as a “social custom aimed at celebrating the most important moments in the lives of individuals and groups.” A ritual and festive event using know-how linked to traditional craftsmanship.

Les Halles, I think, is both at the root of and an embodiment of French gastronomy, one that Emile Zola immortalizes in this sumptuous, biting book.

Source: margaretofthenorth.wordpress.com/2017/10/11/emile-zolas-the-belly-of-paris-celebration-of-food-or-satire
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review 2017-08-25 13:51
40 DAYS AND 1001 NIGHTS by Tamalyn Dallal
40 Days And 1001 Nights, One Woman's Dance Through Life In The Islamic World - Tamalyn Dallal

Living 40 days in a different culture helps you understand the culture.  These are small vignettes of Tamalyn Dallal living in five countries that are with large Islamic populations.  Within each culture, Islam has been changed to take in the local customs that existed when Islam came into the area.  I thought she would live with one family for the whole 40 days but she lived in hotels, apartments, rented rooms, etc. instead of spending all her time with one family.  She met many different people.  I learned much about the cultures and countries, such as where some are and where they are near.  It is interesting and worth reading.  I just wish she had lived with one family 40 days and immersed herself in their daily lives.  

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text 2017-05-15 22:21
Bout of Books Cycle 19 Wrap Up
Shimmy for Me: A California Belly Dance novella - DeAnna Cameron
HEART OF THE SELKIE - Sam Asher
Trouble in Tinseltown (Summer Flings, Book 1) - Aimee Duffy
Misbehaving in Miami (Summer Flings, Book 2) - Aimee Duffy
Forbidden - Beverly Jenkins

Declaration Post

Mid-week Update Post

 

Bout of Books

 

My Bout of Books cycle 19 started at the RT convention and involved traveling back home, so there wasn't a focus on doing the daily challenges this time around. The Friday before I left for Atlanta I did a massive download binge from the NOOK Store's free romance section (I do this when I am stressed for some strange reason). I hoped to get to some of these relatively short books to help pump up my stats for this cycle.

 

Thursday:

Finished first chapter of London: The Novel by Edward Rutherfurd

Got to 36% of Forbidden (Old West #1) by Beverly Jenkins

 

Friday:

Finished Shimmy for Me: A California Belly Dance Novella by DeAnna Cameron

Got to 49% of Forbidden (Old West #1) by Beverly Jenkins

 

Saturday:

Read Selkie Heart by Sam Asher

Read Trouble in Tinseltown (Summer Flings #1) and Misbehaving in Miami (Summer Flings #2) by Aimee Duffy

 

Sunday:

Finished Forbidden (Old West #1) by Beverly Jenkins

 

Stats:

# of full length books read: 2

# of novellas/short stories: 4

# of plays: 1

# of pages read: 809

 

Save the Date! Bout of Books Cycle 20 is August 20th-27th

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