logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: book-of-the-month
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-11-12 21:18
The Lady's Guide to Petticoats and Piracy (Montague Siblings #2)
The Lady's Guide to Petticoats and Piracy - Mackenzi Lee

While I enjoyed The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue, I found it uneven in the way it handled both the historical and fantasy aspects of the story. It felt like neither one really got their fair share of the story, and both suffered as a result. So I was hesitant to give this one a try and probably would've passed it up if one of my groups hadn't chosen it for the book of the month.

 

This was a little slow to start, and Felicity drove me up the wall at first with her selfishness and single-mindedness. Ambition is all well and good, but when it comes hand in hand with stepping over anyone who gets in your way, I can't really back that person up. Thankfully, Felicity does a lot of growing up over the course of the book and it was fun to watch. 

 

I also really appreciated that this book examined all aspects of feminism and femininity, and didn't just focus on the "women can do men's work" aspect of it, because what is men's work anyway? It's a ludicrous concept. But so often in literature and media, girls or women who exhibit more "manly" traits - being good at fighting/killing, being aggressive, etc - are applauded, while women who are traditionally feminine are not. Just look at the different receptions that Arya and Sansa Stark get. This book shows that there's more than one way for women to be independent, strong and self-assured. With Felicity, Johanna and Sim, we get three such women as they go out into the world and figure out how to make their own way in it. It does get a little head-bashy at times, but this is still such an important message that girls need to learn and hear (there's no wrong way to be a woman), that I didn't mind it too much when it got a little preachy.

 

Also, Felicity is ace/aro and I identified so much with her on that aspect of herself. Because really, kissing? Ew. In addition to her is Sim, an African Muslim lesbian/bisexual (we don't really know; it doesn't really matter), and some cameos by Monty and Percy, so there's lots of LGBT+ rep in this book. 

 

I'm confused about who the girl in the cover is supposed to be though. Felicity has red hair, Sim is black, and Johanna doesn't come in until about a third of the way through, though the hair color's a match. But the story is told from Felicity's POV. *shrugs* It's a cool cover. :D

 

I thought the historical aspects were much better handled here than in the first book, and were given much better detail and attention. The fantasy elements too were better handled and integrated into the story, though it takes awhile for them to show up. 

I was still bemused about some of it though, in particular that Johanna doesn't bat an eye at learning that dragons are real. It makes sense for Felicity to take it in stride, given the previous book, but Johanna didn't know magic and alchemy and such were real until that moment. How about some doubt, at least? "I'll believe it when I see it" maybe. Something.

(spoiler show)

Johanna and Felicity both display some uncomfortable (but appropriate for the time) colonialist attitudes at points that I wanted to shake them for. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-11-01 11:06
Reading progress update: I've read 0 out of 1080 pages.
Spinning Silver - Naomi Novik

If this is anything like Uprooted, I will definitely need this audiobook. I sure hope this isn't as dense and frustrating as that book. If it is, I will just move back to Angel.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-14 23:21
City of Brass
The City of Brass - S.A. Chakraborty

First, I would like to say I am glad I had someone read this to me, because some of these names, locations and titles were incomprehensible to me.

 

Now, as for the story, I loved the imagery. The vibrant world and history. But I found this plot wordy and dense. And when it was over, I was also left with a whole lot of unanswered questions. It seemed the plot meandered and snaked, which wouldn't normally be bad. But in this case, I felt like sometimes it forgot what it was trying to convey.

 

The characters were at least varied. We had the leading man, the womanizing secretly gay prince, the uptight warrior, the political king, the snobby princess. This book covered the whole gamete. 

 

If there is a second in this series, I don't know if I will bother with it. 

 

Edit: This is a trilogy. The second is called The Kingdom of Copper, and from the blurb I'm not interested much at all.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-10-12 22:13
Reading progress update: I've listened 720 out of 1200 minutes.
The City of Brass - S.A. Chakraborty

This book isn't nearly as straightforward as I thought. There's a lot going on, and I can say for once, I do not know where things are going. I just hope Dara survives. I don't want to be liking this guy so much and then have him get hacked to pieces by an ifrit.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-10-11 00:24
Reading progress update: I've listened 300 out of 1200 minutes.
The City of Brass - S.A. Chakraborty

There's a Prince Ali. This book. I swear I keep laughing.

 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?