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review 2017-04-08 15:21
D.W. All Wet by Marc Brown
D.W. All Wet - Marc Brown,Marty Appel

Genre:  Animals / Beach / Siblings / Family / Vacation


Year Published: 1988


Year Read:  2017

Publisher: Little, Brown and Company

Series: D.W. #2

 

 

 

DW

After I read “D.W. the Picky Eater,” I got even more interested in Marc Brown’s “D.W.” series since I am a huge fan of his “Arthur” series and I wanted to get into the “D.W.” series as well! So, when I finally got around to reading “D.W. All Wet,” I was pleasantly surprised by the simplistic yet hilarious storytelling of this book!

The story starts off with Arthur’s family going off to the beach for a nice vacation, but D.W. was complaining about not wanting to go to the beach because she did not want to get wet. Even though her family enjoyed swimming in the ocean, D.W. still refused to go out into the ocean for a swim. A few moments later, Arthur was planning on going for a walk and D.W. wanted to go with Arthur, so she climbed on Arthur’s back and they started walking along the beach with D.W. giving Arthur directions on where to go on the beach. Suddenly, Arthur starts losing control of where they were walking and…

Where is Arthur taking D.W. and will D.W. ever get in the water?

Read this book to find out!


You know what, I have always loved Marc Brown’s cute and witty writing on his “Arthur” series and this book is still as witty and fun to read as Marc Brown’s other “Arthur” books! I loved the way that Marc Brown wrote D.W.’s predicament in not wanting to go into the water because she did not want to get wet and it was hilarious seeing D.W. refusing to go into the water even though her family are enjoying themselves. I also found myself relating to D.W.’s predicament in not wanting to go into the water because I remembered when I was little and I was trying to swim for the first time, I did not want to go into the water because I was afraid of drowning, but I eventually got the courage to go into the water after I saw how much fun everyone else was having in the water and this book is extremely relatable to any child who has trouble trying to get into the water at the beach for the first time. I also like the way that Marc Brown portrayed Arthur and D.W.’s relationship in this book as they are not as antagonistic to each other as they usually are in the other “Arthur” books and it was great seeing Arthur trying to help his sister D.W. get into the water and show her how fun swimming can be. Marc Brown’s artwork is much more subdued in this book than in his other books as the outlines of the characters are much lighter in tone instead of the usual bold black lines and the color tones are much more earthly, giving this story a more traditional and down to earth tone.

Overall, “D.W. All Wet” is a truly fantastic and fun book to read for children who love reading books about beaches and having the same experiences as D.W. did. I would recommend this book to children ages four and up since there is nothing inappropriate in this book, unless D.W.’s bratty behavior might be a problem for some children.

Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

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review 2017-04-08 15:11
Time of Wonder by Robert McCloskey
Time of Wonder - Robert McCloskey

Genre:  Family / Nature / Weather / Poetry / Exploration


Year Published: 1957


Year Read:  2010

Publisher: The Viking Press

 

 

Wonder

When I first read this book as a child, I did not really care for this book since I thought that this book was too boring to sit through. However, when I read this book later on as an adult, I realized that this book was a truly moving book. “Time of Wonder” is a Caldecott Medal award winning book from the great mind of Robert McCloskey and it is about how a family spends their time on the islands enjoying the beauties of the island. “Time of Wonder” may seem a bit too boring for smaller children, but it is truly one of Robert McCloskey’s most beautiful and moving books ever created!

Robert McCloskey has done a great job at making the story extremely dreamy and beautiful as he describes the girls’ adventures on the island in a dreamy and poetic fashion, giving the story a beautiful feeling, the type of feeling you get when you go to a wonderful place. Robert McCloskey’s illustrations are much different in this book than in his other books since the images are actually colored instead of the usual black and white images that he usually uses for most of his books. Robert McCloskey’s illustrations are truly realistic and beautiful as he shows images of the island showing its beauty towards the two girls. The images that stood out the most in this book are the images of the ferns growing and the images of the hurricane coming towards the island. The images with the ferns growing shows the ferns uncurling themselves from the ground, which is truly a beautiful sight and the images of the hurricane coming to the island shows the storm making a strong wind that violently blows at the family’s house and you can see the waves being blown so violently and the family being blown by the wind as the father tries desperately to close the door.

Wonder

Smaller children might be bored with this book since the beginning is a tad bit too slow and the action does not really come around until the scene of the hurricane coming to the island. Also, the length of this book is much longer than most picture books and many small children might become bored with this book. Parents might want to read one section of the book for the first day and then read the second section of the book the next day so that way children would not become so easily bored.

“Time of Wonder” is a beautiful and enchanting book about enjoying the true beauty of nature that will have many children respecting nature so much more. I would recommend this book to children ages five and up due to the slow beginning.

Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

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review 2017-04-08 14:59
The Gingerbread Boy by Paul Galdone
The Gingerbread Boy - Paul Galdone

Genre:  Food / Fairy Tale / Retelling / Trickery


Year Published: 1975


Year Read:  2017

Publisher: Clarion Books

 

 

 

Gingerbread

Now, as long as I could remember, I have always heard the stories about everyone’s favorite trouble making food product the “Gingerbread Man” and I had read a couple of children’s books in the past that detailed the Gingerbread Man’s adventures (although it has been years since I had last read a “Gingerbread Man” book). So, when I found out that Paul Galdone had written his own interpretation of the Gingerbread Man story called “The Gingerbread Boy,” I was a bit surprised to see this edition pop up and I had to check it out!

The story starts off with a little old woman and a little old man not having any children of their own and they decided to make a Gingerbread Boy to make up for it. When the old woman put the Gingerbread boy in the oven, she went off to go do some chores in the house and it was then that she forgot about the Gingerbread Boy and the oven started to burn. When the old woman quickly went to open the oven, out jumped the Gingerbread Boy and he ended up running out of the house! This then causes an escalating adventure for the Gingerbread Boy as he runs away from both the old woman and the old man and most of the villagers, while shouting out:

“Run! Run! Run!
Catch me if you can!
You can’t catch me!
I’m the Gingerbread Boy,
I am! I am!”


After the Gingerbread Boy outruns everyone in the village, he meets up with a fox and…

Will the fox catch the Gingerbread Boy?

Read this book to find out!


Paul Galdone’s retelling of the “Gingerbread Man” was quite unique and cute to read as I rarely come across many “Gingerbread Man” interpretations where the titular Gingerbread Man is portrayed as a boy (even though there were no hints about the Gingerbread being a boy other than being called a boy). I also enjoyed the scenes where the Gingerbread Boy ran away from various characters who want to eat him up as it was amusing that the Gingerbread Boy came up with this rhyme to brag about how he can evade any of his pursuers and I found myself repeating the rhymes whenever the Gingerbread Boy escapes from his pursuers. Paul Galdone’s artwork was fun to look at as all the characters and settings look scratchy as it has an old fashioned feel that made the story great to read through. I also loved the images of the Gingerbread Boy itself as it truly looks like a baked gingerbread cookie that happens to come to life and run across the pages in happy glee!

The reason why I gave this book a four star rating was because I felt that the Gingerbread Boy’s taunting verses:

“Run! Run! Run!
Catch me if you can!
You can’t catch me!
I’m the Gingerbread Boy,
I am! I am!”


Had started to get a bit tedious after a while, especially since we keep seeing these same verses pop up on every page every time the Gingerbread Boy runs away from his pursuers. While young children will get enjoyment out of repeating this verse every time the Gingerbread Boy escapes his pursuers, some older readers might find the constant repeatings of this verse to be a bit of a hassle to read through over and over again.

Overall, “The Gingerbread Boy” is a cute book for anyone who is a huge fan of the “Gingerbread Man” stories. I would recommend this book to children ages five and up since the ending of this book might disturb some smaller children.

Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

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review 2017-03-24 00:20
A.S. Byatt: The Children's Book - DNF
The Children's Book - A.S. Byatt

Ok, this is not for me.

 

70 odd pages and no hint of a plot, just a lot of scene setting and Victorian historical information. 

 

I get that this is likely to be character or society study rather than a plot-driven novel, which is fair enough, but I'm not digging the writing. There is a lot of info-dumping, telling rather than showing, and circular writing:

 

 

And again, a pre-teen / early teen questioning their "capability to love"?

Not for me.

 

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text 2017-03-23 21:50
A.S. Byatt: The Children's Book - Reading progress update
The Children's Book - A.S. Byatt

Alright, this is the next book for the RL book group I kinda "joined". 

 

I am finding it really hard to find some interest in this. It's just not working for me to have children in Victorian London - the oldest of whom seems to be 11 - have such a developed understanding of social politics. 

 

Gaaaahhhhhh.....

 

Has anyone read this? I have a mind to DNF this. 

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