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review 2018-03-28 03:42
Judy Moody #1 by Megan McDonald, Peter H. Reynolds (Illustrator)

Why yes, I am an adult who reads children books.

 

930612

 

I will be 80 and still reading picture books. It doesn't matter that books like this are targeted toward preteens or teenagers. I think it is sad if we get to a point in our life where we say "Well I'm XX now, can no longer enjoy that thing I used to enjoy..." It's fine if we naturally outgrow things of course, but don't force yourself to do so if you don't want to.

Judy Moody is a series I could have read when I was around the "right" age, not a preteen, but a teenager. I never read it because of pressure of trying to read things for my age or things that were above my reading level.

I was Judy's age once. It is fun to read about her silly adventures and put myself in her shoes. I never want to get to the point where I can't relate to younger (or older) characters.

Judy and her family are great. Kids of all ages, and kids at heart should get to know them.

*I read this twice. Once from the library and once provided by Netgally*

Source: www.goodreads.com/book/show/930612.Judy_Moody
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text 2018-03-27 22:45
The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashley Spires

I was given a cute picture book to read and here a short review to go with it.

 

18383325

 

 

I am so glad that I love to read books targeted for all ages. I loved this little book. It was really cute.

 

This is a great picture books for kids, even adults. It tells you to keep trying and never give up, no matter what. This book is told in a simple way to get the point across to young readers. However, people of all ages can get something from this story.

It has a good message. It is okay to take a break when you are trying to do something, but don't stop fully. Practice does make better, if not exactly perfect.

I also really enjoyed the artwork.

 

*Provided by Netgally*

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review 2018-01-09 18:31
The Widow's Broom by Chris Van Allsburg
The Widow's Broom - Chris Van Allsburg

Title:  The Widow's Broom

Author:  Chris Van Allsburg

Genre:  Horror / Witches / Halloween 

Year Published: 1992

Year Read: 2010

Publisher:   Houghton Mifflin Company

Source:  Library

Content Rating:  Ages 5+  (Intense Themes of Witchcraft)

 

Widow

“The Widow’s Broom” is a haunting story from the great mind of Chris Van Allsburg and it is about how a lonely widow named Minna Shaw finds a friend in a witch’s broom, but is threatened by the villagers to get rid of the broom because the know that it is witch crafted. “The Widow’s Broom” may have some controversial material about witchcraft, but it is a brilliant read for children who love haunting stories.

Chris Van Allsburg makes this story haunting yet memorable at the same time as it details the story of friendship between a widow and her broom and the bond that Minna Shaw and the broom share together will definitely show children about the importance of friendship even in the worse of times such as when the broom was being harassed by the villagers because it was witch crafted. Chris Van Allsburg’s illustrations are highly beautiful and haunting at the same time as the images are mainly in black and white giving the story a haunting and old fashioned feel since this story probably took place during the 1700s and the image that stood out the most was the image of the broom itself as its handle actually curves when it is doing the work for Minna and because the broom looks so innocent and friendly, many children would actually like the broom instead of fear it.

Widow

Parents should know that the theme of witchcraft in this book might be too sensitive to readers who do not approve of witchcraft, even though personally, this subject does not bother me so much since I am a huge fan of Harry Potter, but the broom in this book was friendly and he only threw up the Spivey boys and the dog because they were harassing the broom. Depending on your views on the subject on witchcraft, parents should talk about this book with their children and see how they handle the witchcraft theme.

“The Widow’s Broom” is a brilliant book about the importance of true friendship and will be an instant treat for children who love reading haunting books. I would recommend this book to children ages five and up due to the witchcraft theme might be scary for smaller children.

Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

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review 2018-01-09 18:16
Nightmares: Poems to Trouble Your Sleep by Jack Prelutsky
Nightmares: Poems to Trouble Your Sleep by Jack Prelutsky (1976-08-01) - Jack Prelutsky

Title:  Nightmares:  Poems to Trouble Your Sleep

Author:  Jack Prelutsky

Artist: Arnold Lobel

Genre:  Horror / Poetry / Halloween / Monsters

Year Published: 1976

Year Read: 2009

Publisher:   Greenwillow Books

Source:  Library

Content Rating:  Ages 7+  (Some Scary Imagery and Graphic Dialogue)

 

Nightmares

Nightmares” is a book of poems written by Jack Prelutsky along with illustrations by Arnold Lobel. This book contains poems about various monsters, wizards and ghosts doing horrible things to unsuspecting people. “Nightmares” might be too scary for smaller children, but older children will love the macabre content of this book. 

Jack Prelutsky’s writing is dramatic and intense as he brings true horror to these poems. Each poem describes a monster doing horrible acts towards their victims and Jack Prelutsky brings great detail to how these victims are tortured, such as in “The Vampire” where Jack Prelutsky describes how the Vampire bites down on its victim and licks the blood off its lips. Arnold Lobel’s illustrations are the center of attention here as they are in black and white coloring, giving the story a gothic feel to it. The image that stood out the most was the image of the Dragon of Death having seven heads and vicious looking eyes in the poem “The Dragon of Death.” 

Nightmares

“Nightmares” is surely one of Jack Prelutsky’s most haunting books he ever created since it talks about how monsters torture their victims to death. I would recommend this book to children ages seven and up since there are too many advanced words that young children might not understand and because of the macabre content displayed vividly in this book.

Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

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review 2018-01-09 18:16
Nightmares: Poems to Trouble Your Sleep by Jack Prelutsky
Nightmares: Poems to Trouble Your Sleep by Jack Prelutsky (1976-08-01) - Jack Prelutsky

Title:  Nightmares:  Poems to Trouble Your Sleep

Author:  Jack Prelutsky

Artist: Arnold Lobel

Genre:  Horror / Poetry / Halloween / Monsters

Year Published: 1976

Year Read: 2009

Publisher:   Greenwillow Books

Source:  Library

Content Rating:  Ages 7+  (Some Scary Imagery and Graphic Dialogue)

 

Nightmares

Nightmares” is a book of poems written by Jack Prelutsky along with illustrations by Arnold Lobel. This book contains poems about various monsters, wizards and ghosts doing horrible things to unsuspecting people. “Nightmares” might be too scary for smaller children, but older children will love the macabre content of this book. 

Jack Prelutsky’s writing is dramatic and intense as he brings true horror to these poems. Each poem describes a monster doing horrible acts towards their victims and Jack Prelutsky brings great detail to how these victims are tortured, such as in “The Vampire” where Jack Prelutsky describes how the Vampire bites down on its victim and licks the blood off its lips. Arnold Lobel’s illustrations are the center of attention here as they are in black and white coloring, giving the story a gothic feel to it. The image that stood out the most was the image of the Dragon of Death having seven heads and vicious looking eyes in the poem “The Dragon of Death.” 

Nightmares

“Nightmares” is surely one of Jack Prelutsky’s most haunting books he ever created since it talks about how monsters torture their victims to death. I would recommend this book to children ages seven and up since there are too many advanced words that young children might not understand and because of the macabre content displayed vividly in this book.

Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

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