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text 2019-01-22 21:48
MLK Day: A Langston Hughes Poem

The poet Langston Hughes was a great inspiration to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Examples of their connection are expansive. In 1956, King recited Hughes’ poem “Mother to Son” from the pulpit to honor his wife Coretta, who was celebrating her first Mother’s Day. That same year, Hughes wrote a poem about Dr. King and the bus boycott titled “Brotherly Love.” At the time, Hughes was much more famous than King, who was honored to have become a subject for the poet. To honor MLK’s legacy today, here’s Langston Hughes’s famous poem “I, Too.”

 

I, Too

 
 
I, too, sing America.
 
I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.
 
Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
“Eat in the kitchen,”
Then.
 
Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed—
 
I, too, am America.
 

 
Langston Hughes, “I, Too” from Collected Poems. Copyright © 1994 by The Estate of Langston Hughes. Reprinted with the permission of Harold Ober Associates Incorporated.
 
Source: The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes (Vintage Books, 2004)
 
Source: nednote.com/langston
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text 2019-01-22 12:14
Friend by Fizza Younis

A friend like you is hard to find,

My foolish jokes you never mind.

I am glad to have such a friend,

You are my start and my end.

That is not all you’re much more,

I do love you that is for sure.

Our friendship started in an odd way,

But this is how it will always stay.

A friend like you comes by once in a lifetime,

Together, this ladder of friendship we must climb.

I love that you can say whatever you feel,

Your honesty was our friendships’ own seal.

I hope you think of me the same way,

To be loved back is now my only pray.

 

© 2018, All Rights Reserved

Source: iambookseater.wordpress.com/2019/01/21/monday-musings-things-to-talk-about
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review 2019-01-20 16:24
A Long Slog Through Icy Lands
The Kalevala: An Epic Poem after Oral Tradition (World's Classics) - Elias Lönnrot,Keith Bosley

I will write a thing and

Declare what I have done

I have read the Kalevala

49 cantos I have read

50 was the number of the cantos

 

My Mother spoke a thing and declared thus

“You cannot read the Kalevala” she said

“Such a reading is not for you.

Read the books of your home.

Not old tales of northern lands.”

 

 

I replied to her and spoke thus, I said

“I will read the Kalevala,

The great epic of Finland.

I will read the words off the pages,

Read the pages out of the book.”

 

I read one page, I read two pages.

I read steady old Vainamoinen

Old man of calm waters.

I read wanton Lemminkainen

Him the Fair Farmind.

 

I read the forging of the Sampo

By the smith Ilmarinen

The everlasting craftsman.

All the way to Marjatta

And the birth of her child

 

My Mother put this into words and spoke thus,

She declared, she chatted.

“I have spotted a fraud!

You have not read all these pages”

I answered her and spoke thus,

 

“Oh, woe is me, a luckless boy,

I read 67 pages and gave up.

I got as far as young Joukahainen

Shooting Vainamoinen’s horse.

Then I downloaded the book from Audible.

 

Based on oral tradition it was,

So an audio book seemed appropriate.

Read by the translator, Keith Bosley,

It is not bad if Medieval lit you enjoy

Or are curious about Tolkien’s influences.”

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review 2019-01-19 04:34
The Graveyard Book
The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaiman

The Graveyard Book is on a 5.1 reading level (5th grade, 1st month of school). This story is about a toddler named Nobody who is raised by ghosts and other beings that live in the cemetery. Since most of the characters are introduced by their epitaph poem, this gives teachers an opportunity to study this type of poem with their class. From this point, students can write an epitaph for the remaining characters in the story, based off what they know about that character from the story. 

 

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text 2019-01-17 21:46
In Memory of Mary Oliver

Poet Mary Oliver died today, at the age of 83.
Here is one of her poems in memory of her life.

 

My Work is Loving the World

–by Mary Oliver (Aug 15, 2016)

 

My work is loving the world.
Here the sunflowers, there the hummingbird –
equal seekers of sweetness.
Here the quickening yeast; there the blue plums.
Here the clam deep in the speckled sand.

Are my boots old? Is my coat torn?
Am I no longer young and still not half-perfect? Let me
keep my mind on what matters,
which is my work,

which is mostly standing still and learning to be astonished.
The phoebe, the delphinium.
The sheep in the pasture, and the pasture.
Which is mostly rejoicing, since all ingredients are here,

Which is gratitude, to be given a mind and a heart
and these body-clothes,
a mouth with which to give shouts of joy
to the moth and the wren, to the sleepy dug-up clam,
telling them all, over and over, how it is
that we live forever.

 

 

This is the first poem in Mary Oliver‘s collection Thirst, titled, “The Messenger.”

 

Read more Poetry Posts

 

Source: nednote.com/in-memory-of-mary-oliver
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