logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: china
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
text 2018-05-30 13:17
China Facial Aesthetics Market: Market Estimation, Dynamics, Regional Share, Trends, Competitor Analysis 2013 to 2017 and Forecast 2018 to 2024

China Facial Aesthetics Market: Market Estimation, Dynamics, Regional Share, Trends, Competitor Analysis 2013 to 2017 and Forecast 2018 to 2024

 

China facial aesthetics market was valued at US $ XX Mn and expected to grow at XX% Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) over 2018 and 2024

 

Market Outline: China Facial Aesthetics Market

China facial aesthetics are the new luxury bag for many people in urban China. In the recent decades, China’s aesthetics market has shown a rapid growth. Facial aesthetics are usually used to soften expression lines and define facial contours. There are various types of injections or injectable fillers that can enhance the natural beauty and rejuvenates the skin. Facial aesthetics gives a radiant glow to the skin.

 

Market Dynamics: China Facial Aesthetics Market

Increasing beauty conscious is major cause for the growth of the facial aesthetics in the China. The rising awareness among the people about the advanced cosmetic treatments is also enriching the growth of the china facial aesthetic market. The rising adoption of the invasive and non-invasive procedures is also influencing the growth of the market. The easy treatment options are attracting people towards the facial aesthetics. The growing cosmetic clinics are driving the market growth. However, the higher cost involved in the treatment procedures and low focus on the R&D activities are likely to hamper the growth of the china facial aesthetics market.

 

 

A sample of this report is available upon request @

https://www.precisionbusinessinsights.com/market-reports/china-facial-aesthetics-market/#ulp-4H8Z4LpNMLEuOnnx

 

Market Scope: China Facial Aesthetics Market

China facial aesthetics market is segmented based on the technology, products, and distribution channel

Based on the technology, the market is segmented into the following:

  • Laser-Based Technology
  • Energy-Based Technology

Based on the products, the market is segmented into the following:

  • Aesthetic Implants
    • Chin implants
    • Jaw Implants
    • Others
  • Aesthetic Lasers and Energy Devices
    • Laser Resurfacing Devices
    • Body Contouring Devices

Based on the distribution channel, the market is segmented into the following:

  • Dermatology Clinics
  • Medical Spa’s
  • Others

 

To view TOC of this report is available upon request @

https://www.precisionbusinessinsights.com/market-reports/china-facial-aesthetics-market/#ulp-c654SbFYO64MsOhu 

 

Competition Assessment: China Facial Aesthetics Market

Some of the players in the china facial aesthetics market include:

  • Cynosure, Inc.
  • Allergan, Inc.
  • Lumenis Ltd
  • Solta Medical, Inc.
  • ZELTIQ Aesthetics, Inc.

 

Notable Market Developments: China Facial Aesthetics Market

  • In December 2016, Cynosure received China FDA clearance for Icon Aesthetic System

 

 

 

Need more information about this report @

https://www.precisionbusinessinsights.com/market-reports/china-facial-aesthetics-market/#ulp-14mlyhjMGhVjZqa3

 

Key Features of the Report:

  • The report provides granular level information about the market size, regional market share, historic market (2013-2017) and forecast (2018-2024)
  • The report covers in-detail insights about the competitor’s overview, company share analysis, key market developments, and their key strategies
  • The report outlines drivers, restraints, unmet needs, and trends that are currently affecting the market
  • The report tracks recent innovations, key developments and startup’s details that are actively working in the market
  • The report provides a plethora of information about market entry strategies and regulatory framework
  • The report analyses the impact of the socio-political environment through PESTLE Analysis and competition through Porter’s Five Force Analysis in addition to recent technology advancements and innovations in the market

 

Get access to full summary @

https://www.precisionbusinessinsights.com/market-reports/china-facial-aesthetics-market/

About Precision Business Insights

 

Precision Business Insights is one of the leading market research and business consulting firm, which follow a holistic approach to solve needs of the clients. We adopt and implement proven research methodologies to achieve better results. We help our clients by providing actionable insights and strategies to make better decisions. We provide consulting, syndicated and customised market research services based on our client needs.

 

Contact to Precision Business Insights,

 

Kemp House,

152 – 160 City Road,

London EC1V 2NX

 

Email: sales@precisionbusinessinsights.com

 

Toll Free (US): +1-866-598-1553

Website @ https://www.precisionbusinessinsights.com

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-05-25 23:57
Fantasy Flights May Meeting - Nebulas
Six Wakes - Mur Lafferty
The Strange Case of the Alchemist's Daughter - Theodora Goss
A Stranger in Olondria - Sofia Samatar
Who Fears Death - Nnedi Okorafor
China Mountain Zhang - Maureen F. McHugh
Lord of Light - Roger Zelazny
All Flesh is Grass - Clifford D. Simak

Every month, I go to a book club that meets at a local taproom. Rather than reading a specific book, each month has a theme. May's theme was the Nebula Awards because, well, they are awarded in May. The Nebulas are one of those awards I've always been vaguely aware of from stickers on books, though I do enjoy Ceridwen's Blogging the Nebulas posts. I was a bit surprised to see how many previous nominees I'd read. I had to cull down to just a handful of recommendations. 

 

Here's what I ended up bringing from this year's ballot:

 

Six Wakes - Mur Lafferty. I wanted to read something on topic for the month, so I compared this year's Nebula and Hugo nominees. The overlap included Six Wakes, which I hadn't read yet, and is published by Orbit. The Hugo voter packet includes whatever publishers provide, and Orbit has traditionally included excerpts of nominees, not full books. Strategery! Turns out, I liked it quite a bit. 

 

The Strange Case of the Alchemist's Daughter - Theodora Goss. I read this one last year, and abso-fucking-lutly loved it. Great characters in an interesting concept, and there's a sequel out really soon. I was so happy to see it on an awards ballot. I won an auction for a signed copy that arrived a day before our May meeting.

 

I also decided, like I had when our theme was the Hugos, to bring some of my favorite losers. The awards hadn't been announced when we met, so I didn't even know my first two picks had lost. I would have brought Stone Sky, but I've rec'd to this group before. But here are some real losers:

 

A Stranger in Olondria - Sofia Samatar.  I adored this beautifully written fantasy novel about a book nerd's misadventures. The not-sequel is also amazing. Samatar's prose is just wonderful. My copy of this was signed here in Alabama, at a lecture she was giving MFA students in Tuscaloosa. Because if a master of the genre is going to make an appearance in my state, I can be a little late to work the next morning. Oh, since I'm late posting this, I can link to her recent AMA. This book lost to Ancillary Justice in 2014. But it did win a World Fantasy Award, a British Fantasy Award, and a Crawford Award. Samatar also won the Campbell Award for best new writer. Her blog has since become private, so I can't link to her post about the WFA, but more on that in the next book.

 

Who Fears Death - Nnedi Okorafor. My copy of this is technically a gift for my niece. I got it signed at Worldcon in Chicago. She's almost old enough to read  it. This is a different indictment/celebration of fantasy than Samatar's, but no less powerful or wonderfully written. It lost to Blackout/All Clear in 2011, and I can't even. It did win a Kindred, and a World Fantasy Award that year, sparking an essay that eventually resulted in a redesign of the award statue 5 years later.

 

China Mountain Zhang - Maureen F. McHugh. I read this so long ago I don't have a review for it. It combines a vast scope with a well done character study. McHugh has done a lot of outstanding work, and this is no exception. This lost to Doomsday Book in 1993, but won a Lambda, Locus, and Tiptree.

 

Lord of Light - Roger Zelazny. This is one of those books that starts off firmly a fantasy, but reveals itself as science fiction, and the author is a poet. One of my favorite books. My current not for load copy is the leather bound Eaton Press edition. In addition to being a piece of goddamned art, this book was the cheesy sci-fi novel used as cover for the Canadian Caper, aka, the CIA operation in Argo. It lost to The Einstein Intersection in 1968, but won a Hugo that year.

 

All Flesh is Grass - Clifford D. Simak. Simak wrote at least three versions of alien invasions that followed roughly the same plot. This is the best one. A small town finds itself cut off from the outside world and some purple flowers are revealed to be extraterrestrials. Creepy and weird, it's worth a read if you're visiting that era of scifi. It lost to Dune in 1966, making it one of the first losers.

 

Next month's theme is Urban Fantasy.

Like Reblog Comment
url SPOILER ALERT! 2018-05-15 20:14
Applying Quantum Physics Consciousness within the worlds of Philosophy
A-Ma Alchemy of Love - Nataša Pantović Nuit
A-Ma: Alchemy of Love - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Tree of Life - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Conscious Creativity: Mindfulness Meditations - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Spiritual Symbols: With their Meanings (Alchemy of love mindfulness training) (Volume 8) - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Art of 4 Elements - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Art of 4 Elements - Nataša Pantović Nuit

Applying Quantum Physics Consciousness within the worlds of Philosophy

In our search for  or Good-ness, , Bliss, throughout human history, we came across the Mother of them all – the mystical, magical, occult, scientific Philosophy.

Philosophy was known as the Mother of all Sciences. It was at the very top of the scientific hierarchy. You may not practice it unless you have achieved enough knowledgeand experience so you can call your-self Wise.

spiral hands divine consciousness spiritual evolution article alchemy of love

 

 

Claiming Philosophy or Philosophy Around the World

How many times have you heard a quote of a famous ancient philosopher contributed to a contemporary political figure? A quote of a saint, being used within a contemporary power machine? Too many...

 

Because our s are embodied within this space and time;and our memory short, we tent to forget how many generations embodied this fight for goodness within our beautiful planet Gaia.

 

Read more - http://artof4elements.com/entry/216/philosophy-mother-of-all-sciences-applied

Source: artof4elements.com/entry/216/philosophy-mother-of-all-sciences-applied
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-20 15:07
The Good Women of China / Xinran
The Good Women of China: Hidden Voices - Xinran

When Deng Xiaoping’s efforts to “open up” China took root in the late 1980s, Xinran recognized an invaluable opportunity. As an employee for the state radio system, she had long wanted to help improve the lives of Chinese women. But when she was given clearance to host a radio call-in show, she barely anticipated the enthusiasm it would quickly generate. Operating within the constraints imposed by government censors, “Words on the Night Breeze” sparked a tremendous outpouring, and the hours of tape on her answering machines were soon filled every night. Whether angry or muted, posing questions or simply relating experiences, these anonymous women bore witness to decades of civil strife, and of halting attempts at self-understanding in a painfully restrictive society. In this collection, by turns heartrending and inspiring, Xinran brings us the stories that affected her most, and offers a graphically detailed, altogether unprecedented work of oral history.

 

This is a heartbreaking book which I would never have picked up except I was looking for an X author for my Women Authors A-Z reading challenge this year. I never know how to rate books like these because it’s important to know about the situations in countries other than our own, but I always feel helpless and angry when I know that women are having such frightful difficulties.

I have to bear in mind that this book was published in 2002 originally, the author having moving from China to England in order to be free to do such a thing. A lot can and probably has changed in 16 years, plus many of the stories related in this book are from earlier years yet.

The Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) seems to have disrupted relations between men and women and the nature of family relationships to an extreme. Survival was top of mind for everyone and each did what they had to. Xinran reveals the painful stories told to her by Chinese women—of having children horribly injured, daughters gang raped, husbands treating them like servants (or livestock), work denied, promotions skipped over, you name it.

As China seems to be heading into another iteration of their authoritarian regime, there will undoubtedly be more issues for women. I hope there is still someone like Xinran to listen to women’s voices and to articulate what they are able to (Xinran herself had to walk a fine line so as not to offend the Communist Party).

In the era of the Me Too and Time’s Up campaigns here in North America, we have to hope that our sisters on other continents are able to achieve some gains as well.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-19 20:51
Little Soldiers by Lenora Chu
Little Soldiers: An American Boy, a Chinese School, and the Global Race to Achieve - Lenora Chu

This is a really interesting book that offers a firsthand view of the Chinese school system from a mostly-American perspective. Lenora Chu is a daughter of Chinese immigrants who was raised in the U.S., her husband a white American who volunteered in China with the Peace Corps. After moving to Shanghai for work, they enroll their son in a prestigious Chinese preschool. Concerning incidents at the school spark the author’s journey to learn more about the Chinese school system: she observes classrooms in China and the U.S., talks to experts, and gets to know Chinese high schoolers and parents.

So the book is part memoir, part nonfiction. From an American perspective it’s a fascinating comparison; so much of what I tend to view as going wrong in current American ideas of education and child-rearing seems to be heightened in China, from overscheduled kids (in China it’s usually tutoring or extracurricular classes rather than swimming, gymnastics etc.), to an unwillingness to let kids play freely and explore because they might hurt themselves (other parents judge Chu for letting her son run around the living room jumping off chairs, etc., and the school states that kids aren’t allowed to talk during lunch because they might choke), to a heavy emphasis on testing. Regarding that last one, pressure for the high school and college entrance exams in China is so intense that in one town a crackdown on cheating resulted in parents and students rioting.

Which actually leads to one of the positive features of the Chinese system: Chinese families tend to treat academics the way American families treat sports, to the point of huge crowds of people gathering outside exam sites to see their kids off and shout well-wishes. While Americans face a social penalty for being “nerds” and tend to view academic success as a matter of inborn talent (so if you don’t have it, why bother to try), the Chinese have valued brains – and judged people by their test scores – for centuries, and believe that success is largely a matter of effort. They aren’t afraid to demand work from kids or to ask them to memorize. This is especially noticeable in math: while American schools tend to wrap up simple math in verbally complicated “word problems” in an attempt to make the work “relevant” to kids who won’t have a professional job for a decade or more anyway, Chinese schools forge ahead and have young kids doing more advanced problems. This is helped by the fact that Chinese teachers specialize in their subject matter from the first grade, while American elementary school teachers are generalists (who by and large don’t like math and weren’t good at it themselves). Of course it’s also helped by Chinese schools’ making no attempt to integrate kids with special needs into regular classrooms, which American schools must do.

It’s evident from Chu’s writing that all of these issues are complicated: each school system has its advantages and disadvantages, but many of the advantages come with their own negatives or are bound up with the culture and therefore hard to replicate, while the disadvantages can also have silver linings. And of course no huge country has a uniform school system: just as the U.S. has both great and failing schools, China too has huge disparities, with many rural schools being shafted.

There's a lot in the book that I haven't even discussed here: politics in the classroom, the social position of teachers, the encouragement of creativity or lack thereof, and how all this affects students in the long run. But the book isn’t a treatise. Chu keeps it lively and interesting with accounts of her own family’s experiences, and with a clear, journalistic writing style. I imagine some readers might criticize her parenting decisions – at times it felt as if she were trying to claim a high-minded rationale for a choice of school that ultimately came down to cost, while she and her husband seemed willing to accept (if unhappily) a certain amount of what many Americans would consider abusive treatment of preschool kids (such as forcefeeding, or threatening to call the police on them when they misbehave) in the interests of having a disciplined and well-behaved child. But for the American reader it’s a fascinating window into a very different school system, and into Chinese culture as a whole. It is balanced and thoughtful, and the author comes across as open-minded, curious and willing to adapt rather than pushing an agenda. I do wish it had endnotes rather than a chapter-by-chapter bibliography, for readers to follow up and learn more. But I learned a lot from this book, enjoyed reading it, and would recommend it.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?