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text 2020-06-02 19:08
Non-book post: Protest tonight

My racist little town that had a KKK rally as recently as 2007 is having a Black Lives Matter protest tonight, and a lot of the discussions around it are horrifying. People against the protest don't seem to realize that they're the ones jumping instantly to threats of violence.

 

One thing I've noticed is that people seem to be fine talking about shooting protesters because they've already put them all in an Other category. "The protesters aren't people from around here, they're bused in from elsewhere. They're antifa." Everyone I know of who's going either lives in this area, grew up in this area, or otherwise has family and friends in this area. The organizer doesn't live here anymore, but he grew up here.

 

One thing I've started doing, anytime someone brings up "antifa" in their comments, is pretend I'm stupid and say something like "Oh wow, so you're pro-fascist?" It's been fascinating to me how many people don't realize that "antifa" is just an abbreviation for "anti-fascist" and not the organized terror group they seem to think it is.

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text 2020-06-02 19:05
Reading progress update: I've listened 151 out of 615 minutes.
Girls With Sharp Sticks - Suzanne Young,Caitlin Davies

This is creepy in an enjoyable sort of way. 

 

Personally, I'm already looking forward to the revenge these girls will take when they finally figure out what's going on.

 

Meanwhile, one of the things that makes it extra creepy is that much of the instruction that they're being given would have been commonplace in 1950's finishing schools.

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text 2020-06-02 17:24
Full immersion. Super Training Techniques for Quick Skills

The idea of classical teaching - when we listen to lectures, read textbooks and do exercises - is based on the transfer effect: it is assumed that what is learned in one context (in the audience) will be applied at the right time in another (in real life). Unfortunately, this almost never works.

To learn quickly and effectively, it is worthwhile to get knowledge in the same context in which we will apply it. There are 4 tricks in the book Super Teaching that will help you organize this.

 

Project Based Learning

Many super-workers (people who master knowledge and skills extremely quickly) choose projects rather than courses. The logic is simple: if you organize your training around the production grabmyessay review of something, then you are guaranteed to learn how to do this thing. If you just attend classes, you can spend a lot of time on notes and reading, but never reach the goal.

 

Immersion training

Diving is when you literally dive into the environment in which the skill is practiced. The simplest example is learning a language in the country where it is used. Staying among the speakers guarantees: you will communicate much more and more diverse than you would do in the audience, which means that you will learn the language faster.

Learning a foreign language is not the only area of ‚Äč‚Äčapplication of the immersion method. For example, novice programmers can join open source projects to try themselves in solving new coding problems. Think about how to immerse yourself in the area you are studying.

Flight Simulation Method

Projects and immersion are cool, but some skills cannot be developed in real conditions. Safe piloting or surgery cannot be safely practiced. In this case, try to simulate the most similar situation.

For example, a flight simulator is used to teach piloting. This is almost as effective as controlling a real airplane if you reproduce the same tasks that you have to solve in the air. The simulator does not have to be perfect: it does not matter whether the graphics and sound exactly match the flight. It is important that key skills are trained. Then the transfer will be easier.

 

Redundant approach

This method consists in maximizing the expansion and complexity of the task. For example, superman Tristan de Montebello mastered his oratory skills before speaking at the World Cup. At first he trained at oratory clubs, but felt that he was appreciated there too gently. Then he decided to perform in secondary schools.

Schoolchildren are merciless. If jokes are not funny and speech is boring, they openly express it. Tristan immediately read in faces: "Redo!" Such honest feedback allowed us to learn faster and more intensively.

Think about how you can learn “in abundance,” that is, to solve problems more complex than those that confront you in real life. However, do not overestimate yourself: a hostile environment can demotivate and undermine faith in one’s abilities. Choose a high but adequate level of requirements.

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text 2020-06-02 13:52
The First Review!

 

It's DAY 2 of my Luminous Blog Tour, and I am excited to share this first touching book review from author Stephanie Churchill.

 

 

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text 2020-06-02 11:33
Reading progress update: I've listened 141 out of 543 minutes. Depressingly accurate
Daisy Jones & The Six - Taylor Jenkins Reid

It's painful watching these people fail themselves. The quotes from their older selves are depressingly accurate:

 

 

 

'Drinking, drugging, sleeping around, it's all the same thing. You have these lines you won't cross but then you cross them and suddenly you possess the vary dangerous information that you can break the rule and the world won't instantly come to an end. You've taken a big black bold line and you've made it a little bit grey. Now, every time you cross it again it just gets greyer and greyer until one day you look around and you think, "there was a line here once, I think."'

 

 

 

 

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