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review 2018-03-17 16:05
Til Death Do Us Party
Til Death Do Us Party - Vickie Fee

Hilarious! From the warm characters to the fun plots, this series always brings an enjoyable read. This one has the gang in Las Vegas for Mama's Elvis themed wedding as she prepares to wed her hunka hunka burnin' love, Earl but everyone is All Shook Up when the Elvis impersonator minister drops dead in the middle of the ceremony. The puzzling plot and many laugh out loud moments (like the Bachelorette party!) made this a very entertaining read. And poor Hard Headed Di, I really felt for her wanting to believe the best in that Hound Dog, but I couldn't understand why Liv kind of left her hanging, there were several times in the book where she just let things drop with Di. Don't be cruel, Liv! I'm not sure how Liv came up with the motive, which was kind of out in left field, but it made for a great surprise twist ending and the sweet wedding and welcome home party were heartwarming and left me with a smile on my face. (and I'm out of Elvis song titles to add!)

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review 2018-03-17 15:56
Death, Bones, and Stately Homes
Death, Bones, and Stately Homes - Valerie S. Malmont

I put off reading this for a long time, because it was the last book in the series *sniffle* and the author died a few years ago. *sniffle* *sigh* It was a great series and oh, how I wish it could've kept going, if only to wrap up a few story lines.


After Tori and her friend Alice-Ann find skeletal remains in a walled up cave next in an springhouse, Alice-Ann is quick to silence her friend - at least until after the home tour benefiting the local Humance Society (Think of the poor little kitties!) The body is probably that of a local music teacher who disappeared on his wedding day decades ago, and his wife-to-be disappeared a few weeks later. When the bride is found dead in a trunk, Tori knows she can't rest until the murders are solved.


This was a bit more graphic than a lot of cozy mysteries, but not so graphic that it would make anyone queasy. It was an excellent plot, and I enjoyed watching Tori uncover so many secrets from the past. I'm always sucked in by an old mansion that holds secrets. An exciting read and a satisfying ending made this a great cap to the series and left me wanting more, although sadly, that won't come.


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text 2018-03-17 06:29
KYD Green Round: Cause of Death Guess - Team MbD / TA /Lillelara


Aiming for the "run over by a carriage" card for this round. The Miniaturist fulfills two of the tasks: it´s a historical fiction novel and it is written by an English woman author.

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review 2018-03-16 15:54
Ever wondered about the anatomy of a leech?
Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything - Lydia Kang,Nate Pedersen

As soon as I saw Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything by Lydia Kang I knew that I had to get it in my hands. If the name alone doesn't intrigue you then I don't know what will. This book is full to bursting with historical facts about crazy medical practices through the ages. It is an excellent resource about the history of the medical profession as well as education and social change. Much like when I read Soonish, I felt that it was a little heavy with the 'relatable' humor but this was easily overlooked. (I think Kang pulled it off better anyway.) As someone who has read quite a bit about the history of medicine, I was surprised by just how much I didn't know. For example, did you know that leeches have 3 stomachs, 3 jaws, and 100 teeth in each of those jaws?! Kang sets up the different medical practices and procedures by first giving a history of the person that started it off (generally a 'medical practitioner' or someone at least purporting to be one). She then shares accounts from the patients who endured such crazy routines (like bloodletting or ingesting arsenic) paired with diagrams of the medical equipment used to accomplish such feats. (I hope you have a strong stomach for the bloodletting chapter.) I especially enjoyed the little asides about what we now know about the concoctions put together long ago to 'cure' and how the vast majority of them were either complete hokum or actually increased the chances of the patient suffering an agonizing death. It makes you wonder how the future generations will view our supposedly 'innovative' medicines and treatments of the sick. Will we be seen as medical charlatans and blind fools or will they take into account the socioeconomic and political climate that we live in and how that shapes our view on medicine as a whole? As you read this book (and I hope you will) ponder that very question because then perhaps you won't judge past generations quite so harshly...unless it's the guys who took Strychnine in order to increase their sex drive. Always judge those guys. 9/10


I wasn't lying about the leeches. [Source: Amazon]



What's Up Next: HiLo Book 4: Waking the Monsters by Jeff Winick


What I'm Currently Reading: The Murderer's Ape by Jakob Wegelius


Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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text 2018-03-13 23:55
KYD Green Round: Suspect Card Guess - Team MbD / Lillelara / TA
Unnatural Death: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery - Dorothy L. Sayers,Ian Carmichael


Finished Dorothy L. Sayers's Unnatural Death over the weekend and decided to use it for a Stephen King suspect guess (a book by an author whose [last] name begins with "S").

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