logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: editions
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-03-04 23:49
Review of The Double by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
The Double (Dover Thrift Editions) - Fyodor Dostoyevsky,Constance Garnett

This was my third Dostoyevsky book and I found it to be powerful.  This short novel basically follows a man who is slowly having a mental break.  You can't help but feel empathy for the man and want to reach out and help him.  Dostoyevsky does an incredible job of showing what is inside his characters' minds and I found myself to be moved by this story.  I would have liked a bit more resolution at the end for this to be a 5 star read for me, but overall highly recommended.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-01-16 14:54
Bittersweet Conclusion
McLevey: The Collected Editions: Series 11 and 12 - Brian Cox,Siobhan Redmond,David Ashton,Bbc Radio 4

It is bittersweet to come to the end of the BBC radio series of McLevy. Bittersweet because at least, David Ashton has McLevy novels as well as Jean Brash novels. So that's good. But this series is such a joy. The casting is well done - Brian Cox as McLevy and Siobhan Redmond as Jean Brash led a cast that includes David Ashton himself. The mysteries are interesting. There is even a wonderful sense of place. 

 

This is a great series and well worth listening to.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-12-08 10:18
Mise en Abyme: "The Double" by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
The Double (Dover Thrift Editions) - Fyodor Dostoyevsky,Constance Garnett



(Original Review, 1981-03-23)



Hammett I take to have a brilliant literary mind and to be well read in Literature. I take him to be able to know what a Byronic Hero is, what others thought about that, to have his own thoughts about it, as well as lots of other things (like about detective stories), of course. And I take him to have an idea of what a parable is and how it differs from a story, or what an archetype or double is. Take the 'double': all he has to do is READ Poe's William Wilson, or Dostoevsky’s “The Double” to get what it is as Literature. Or to read Hamlet to know how a “mise en abyme” works. He knows these things and uses them WITH THE MIND OF A BRILLIANT WRITER. A mind that processes literature not as a critic or simple reader, but as a creator of it.

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-11-05 17:10
Somewhere between Baghdad and Frankfurt
Destination Unknown (Signature Editions) - Agatha Christie

I liked this one less than I liked They Came To Baghdad, but much more than I liked A Passenger to Frankfurt. It's still a late Agatha thriller, which means that it has problems, but it wasn't awful.

 

"Peters said gloomily: “I suppose it always comes to the same thing in the end. A madman who believes he’s God.”

 

There is something so naive about Christie's thrillers - I think that early in her career, her youth and charm insulated her from the ugliness of geopolitics, and late in her career, her wealth served in the same way. It's interesting to me that the body count is often lower in the thrillers than it is in the straight up murder mysteries. She doesn't seem to even remotely grasp the actuality of the violence of espionage and political intrigue.

 

Destination Unknown lacks the romping charm of the Bundle Brent thrillers, or The Secret Adversary, but still requires a suspension of disbelief upon which it fails, ultimately to deliver. The main character, Hilary Craven, is likable and brave. There are wheels turning within wheels turning within wheels, but at the end of the day, the entire machine sort of breaks down.

 

Anyway, this is a lower tier Christie, but didn't hit rock bottom.

 
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-11-03 16:50
Reading progress update: I've read 58%.
Destination Unknown (Signature Editions) - Agatha Christie

This is an odd book. It does remind me a lot of Passenger to Frankfurt, but, at least so far, it isn't nearly as awful as that one. Although it was really the ending that blew up that book, so there is still time.

 

Christie had a really bizarre obsession with the "elites" basically starting their own society to take over the world. Her late thrillers - They Came To Baghdad, Passenger to Frankfurt, and now this one, remind me a bit of Rand's Atlas Shrugged, although Christie definitely frames hers as cautionary tales, while Rand basically glorifies the idea of (her formulation) "the makers" abandoning "the looters" to death and starvation. 

 

Destination Unknown doesn't have the charm of They Came to Baghdad, at least not so far. Hilary Craven (interesting name choice, there) lacks the manic pixie dream girl charm of Victoria Jones, being of a more serious, less effervescent, character.

 

At this point, though, Passenger to Frankfurt represents the execrable nadir of Christie novels for me, so anything that is, even slightly, less awful will be okay.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?