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review 2017-03-20 16:10
A Perilous Undertaking (Veronica Speedwell #2)- Deanna Raybourn
A Perilous Undertaking - Deanna Raybourn

While Victorian England is not generally my go-to time period (Usually I am a sucker for anything Tudor-Era or Dark Ages), one Miss Veronica Speedwell is quickly making me think I should venture out of my bubble more often. This is the second novel in the Veronica Speedwell series. It is just as much fun as the first. Hopefully there will be many more adventures to follow. 

 

The mystery wasn't anything overly complicated and shocking. I had most of it figured out rather quickly. The characters are what sell. Veronica borders on anachronistic at times but her snark and wit are enough for me to forgive the offense. Stoker hits just about every point on my literary boyfriend checklist. The eye patch is just a delicious bonus. I imagine him to be much like Alan Van Sprang's Sir Francis Bryan from The Tudors. Just in Victorian dress. Lady Wellie was a fantastic addition to the ever growing cast of characters. 

 

In addition to getting to know Veronica and Stoker better, I was also introduced to how to say dildo in a variety of languages. Seriously, I don't think I've seen the word phallus so many times in a book since the textbook I had for a college class on Human Sexuality. If that isn't enough to peak your interest, I'm not really sure what more I can offer. I can't recommend this series enough for people interesting in taking a quick romp through Victorian England. And really, how can you say no to that cover? 

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text 2017-03-20 00:57
Reading progress update: I've read 130 out of 338 pages.
A Perilous Undertaking - Deanna Raybourn

"Dil-No, I can't. I can tell you in Greek. These are olisboi. Or if you prefer, in Spanish, consoladores."

 

"Consolers? But how could they console...oh. Oh!"

 

Because a person always needs to learn how to say dildo in three different languages. I guess I didn't realize the word even existed in 1887. I would look up the origins by myself but this device was provided to me by the school I work for. And, the other adult in my house is the person who gets notifications when people type strange things into Google.

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text 2017-03-19 21:41
Reading progress update: I've read 51 out of 338 pages.
A Perilous Undertaking - Deanna Raybourn

Lady Wellie! I think I am in love.

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text 2017-02-01 15:04
Reading progress update: I've read 15%.
Martyr - Rory Clements

So far I'm finding this book to be dark and gritty. The author creates an atmosphere that oozes back alley intrigue. I must say I find this Walsingham to be rather reminiscent of Geoffrey Rush's portrayal from the movie Elizabeth. A portrayal which is top of the list in my opinion.

 

I have spent a great deal of time searching for a Tudor era series as compelling as Sansom's Shardlake novels. It appears that with Clement's Shakespeare, I may have finally found something worthy of comparison.  Of course, I'm only 15% of the way into the novel so I'm setting myself up to be slightly disappointed as this a first novel. 

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review 2017-01-23 04:20
The Queen's Accomplice (A Maggie Hope Mystery)- Susan Elia MacNeal
The Queen's Accomplice: A Maggie Hope Mystery - Susan Elia MacNeal

On the heels of millions of women world wide, coming together to protest the fact that women are still treated like some sort of inferior species of unknown descent, I picked up this novel. I adore Maggie Hope. She may be a little anachronistic at times but I'm will to let it slide. Partially because she's a redhead and us redheads have to stick together. Mainly I let it slide because of events like yesterday. A fictional Maggie Hope was fighting nearly 80 years ago to be given rights many women still don't have today. All I can think of is the various images of women carrying signs that read "It's 2017 and I can't believe I'm still protesting this shit." Hopefully I won't have to see pictures of my eldest daughter, ten years from now at the tender age of 18, wearing a va-jay-jay hat carrying the same sign. 

 

By the way, I thought this book was excellent. 

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