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review 2018-09-24 17:13
Kitchen Witchcraft: Spells & Charms by Rachel Patterson
Kitchen Witchcraft - Rachel Patterson

This is one of those books you keep around and pull up when you are lookigng to help make a difference. It is not a book you read from cover to cover then forget about. It is more of a reference book.

 

If you like magic and witch craft this is a very good book. It is good for beginners as well. Mot of the items used in the spells are in most peoples homes already or are very easy to obtain with a trip to Wal-Mart or the grocery store. The wording used in the book is easy to understand, and the spells are easy to cast.

 

I enjoyed the variety of instances that the spells can be used for. This is not a book of spells just for love , money, or good health.

 

I received this book from the Author or Publisher via Netgalley.com and chose to leave this review.

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text 2018-07-31 13:19
July Wrap-up
Conrad Monk and the Great Heathen Army - Edoardo Albert
Kitchen Witchcraft - Rachel Patterson
Haunted Castles of England - J.G. Montgomery
Ghost Boy - Stafford Betty
Llewellyn's Little Book of Life Between Lives - The Newton Institute
Woven in Wire - Sarah Thompson
Unnatural Creatures - Maria Dahvana Headley,Neil Gaiman
Herbal Formularies for Health Professionals, Volume 2 - Jill Stansbury
Knitting Ganseys, Revised and Updated: Techniques and Patterns for Traditional Sweaters - Beth Brown-Reinsel

9 books this month, which is good for me. 6 of them were non-fiction which don't take as long (usually) and 8 of the 9 were from Netgalley.

 

I do have another 7 partial reads on the go which I hope to at least mostly finish by end of August and one more book from Netgalley that definitely won't fit into Halloween Bingo, so I'll start it next.

 

I have 5 books from Netgalley that I haven't started yet that just might fit a Halloween Bingo category, so I'll wait to see what they are before I start any of those! Unless I actually finish all of my current reads, in which case there is one less likely than the others.

 

I'm still working my way through the massive pile of samples. Hopefully choosing books for Bingo will lead to eliminating a few of those! There are a couple in my Horror folder that I hope to include in Bingo, not least of all the third book of the Jason Crane series. It's becoming a tradition to read one of these each year! Though I think this is the last of the series.

 

Of this month's books, the stand out was Conrad Monk and the Great Heathen Army, which I reviewed on my last post before this one. It earned a rare 5 star rating from me.

 

Two of the non-fiction books I read will remain among my reference books; Haunted Castles in England and Herbal Formularies for Health Professionals. The Jewellery and knitting books will also get some future mileage and hopefully I'll find time to try a few projects.

 

So not a bad month, but I definitely need some more good fiction reads in the upcoming months.

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review 2018-07-27 14:43
Kitchen Witchcraft: Spells and Charms
Kitchen Witchcraft - Rachel Patterson

by Rachel Patterson

 

It's refreshing to see a book of this nature start with warnings about allergies and toxicity when working with herbs or essential oils. This is so often missed out! It's the first book of a series that looks very interesting for beginners.

 

The tone is like one of those teenage witchcraft books, but there is some good information and from more modern paths included that you don't often see in Wicca/Witchcraft books, like a very basic explanation of sigil magic.

 

There were a few things I would disagree with, like being very specific when doing a spell to get a job. If you target just one application, you don't leave room for other opportunities to pop up out of nowhere! And some of the correspondences didn't sit quite right, though these will always bring disagreement. The lists looked more like examples and weren't extensive.

 

Overall I found it light on instruction. Someone wanting to construct a formal spell will have to look elsewhere for details, but there are a lot of books on the market for that. The one worrying thing is that although how to banish something from your life was mentioned, there was nothing about banishing residual energies after doing a spell.

 

What it was strong on was folk magic spells. There were a lot of examples for how to apply these to various purposes and a lot of definitions for forms of magic, if only partial information on how to do them. There was also a lot of "use your intuition" and plugs for the author's other books, as well as a story told about a candle flame gone wrong that could have been avoided by using a proper candle holder. This surprised me after the good advice at the beginning about toxicity safety.

 

Overall I think it would make a good first book for someone who wants to dip their toe into magic and see how it sits without getting into too much trouble. I'd still like to have seen more detailed information about how to clear unwanted energies, just in case.

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review 2015-10-23 16:09
This book is essentially about my life and how I live and work as a kitchen witch. It is my Book of Shadows, my Kitchen Witch’s Grimoire. It covers what it means to be a witch, how we work, what we do and how we celebrate the turning of the seasons. It is packed full of information about all sorts of subjects from a breakdown of rituals to reading auras, along with meditations, recipes for oils, incenses and spells and a huge amount of crafts to make for each Sabbat. The information herein does not follow any strict tradition; it is my own interpretation of witchcraft melding together my Wiccan training with kitchen witchery, ways of the Old Craft and a bit of hoodoo thrown in for good measure. You can also find a lot of information about magical
cooking, herbs and gardening in my first book, Pagan Portals: Kitchen Witchcraft, it’s not included here because I didn’t want to duplicate!

I believe magic and the Craft to be fluid and flexible, it is ever changing and we are ever learning.
Grimoire of a Kitchen Witch: An Essential Guide to Witchcraft - Rachel Patterson

This is from the opening to Rachel Patterson's Grimoire of a Kitchen Witch. I think the bit of a book where the author lays out their intentions is always a helpful thing to look over. I tend to know from an intro whether the book is going to suit me or not, and I very much enjoyed this one, precisely because it's a personal interpretation drawing on experience coupled with a willingness to improvise.

 

'Grimoire' sounds a bit sinister and dangerous (I think) but this book is anything but. It's a warm, often playful, insightful and inspiring take on a very down to earth kind of witchcraft.

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