Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: librarybook
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-01-07 05:18
The Education of Dixie Dupree - Donna Everhart


Donna Everhart

Paperback, 352 pages
Published October 25th 2016 by Kensington
1496705513 (ISBN13: 9781496705518)
I really enjoyed this book despite some of the difficult to hear subjects represented in the book. Everhart writes from Dixie Dupree's point of view and does a great job of giving the characters personality. The story line kept me coming back to check in on Dixie while she dealt with some pretty serious stuff for an 11 year old. I would definitely recommend this, with the disclaimer of be ready for some serious subject matter. This is not a bad thing, as the subjects need to be talked about (I'm trying not to add spoilers).


Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-07-02 04:52
Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman - Lindy West

The tragedy of books like these is that the readers are basically the choir to which the author sings. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-06-24 02:27
what happens when a group discusses a book about women? mansplaining!
Nine Parts of Desire: The Hidden World of Islamic Women - Geraldine Brooks

I read this as part of a bookclub discussion. The book was selected by a lovely woman who fled Iran 24 years ago, and had lived through the revolution, war and economic sanctions against her country. She said she started reading it a year ago but it was just too emotional and so she thought with the support of the bookclub she could get through it. I was grateful for her choice as this was interesting, informative and a unique perspective on the topic. Instead of a classic 'book report' I have decided to share the bookclub discussion experience.


So, the group met yesterday evening, 9 women and 5 men. The group on the whole is well educated, well informed, well read and generally progressive. After everyone has takes a turn to give their impression of the book, open discussion follows. And guess what followed? MANSPLAINING! The book was about women in Islamic middle eastern cultures, told through very personal stories. Some were positive, but many very illustrative of how women are subjugated, abused and repressed. While political and economic policy are relevant to such a book, this wasn't a book about politics or policy. Nevertheless, a subset of the men in the room hijacked the discussion into that. When the woman from Iran (who lived through the revolution) explained that Iranian revolution in 1979 was not entirely rooted in the rise Islamic fundamentalism, she was corrected. When she described the economic disparity in Iran (no middle class) she was corrected. When I brought up my opinion that it's not the Islamic faith that leads to repression of women, but rather patriarchal cultural practices, I was corrected. The irony of the whole situation was not lost on me, nor was it lost on many of the other women in the room.

To be fair, these men aren't misogynists and they are probably sympathetic to feminist causes. But they have also been raised to be more assertive and are better skilled at inserting their opinions into the discussion. They may not consciously discount a woman' s opinion, but they probably are oblivious to their subconscious biases. Even in 'so called' enlightened western culture, in one of the most liberal cities in America, you can find micro aggressions against women in the context of a book discussion about the oppression of Islamic women. ¯_(ツ)_/¯


Now, turn a subconscious bias against women into one that is culturally sanctioned through religious interpretation and you have the plight of many many Islamic women in the Middle East. Even though this book is 20+ years old and not without flaws, it is informative a worth a read.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-06-24 02:16
brain surgery is done by humans, not gods
By Henry Marsh Do No Harm - Henry Marsh

Although I was sorry there wasn't a chapter featuring deep brain stimulation, this is the brain surgery book I hoped for!  The memoir isn't particularly well structured and the stories don't always have a well defined arc, but that doesn't matter.  The author is a brain surgeon for god sake, not a Pulitzer winning author.   What is revealed is the challenging world of high risk surgery carry high levels of risk and reward.  Surgeons are notorious for having big egos, and Dr. Henry Marsh is no exception.  His disdain for hospital and healthcare management was as evident as his compassion for his patients.  He candidly talks about his struggles dealing with less than sympathetic patients.  Also, kudos to the best temper tantrum I've seen in a book (following a botched job performed by a trainee).    

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-06-18 06:23
recommended for those in abusive relationship who need practical advice an understanding advocate
Daily Wisdom for Why Does He Do That? - Lundy Bancroft

An excellent practical guide for those in abusive relationships.  It's less clinical and jarring than his first book [book:Why Does He Do That?: Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men|224552] and likely easier for those in abusive relationships to read.   While he doesn't sugar coat things or give false hope, Mr. Bancroft is an empathetic voice and understands the difficulty and plight of those in abusive relationships.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?