logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: living
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
url 2017-04-20 12:14
Mindfulness Training Mindful Living Courses Content Methodology Mission at Goodreads
Mindful Being - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Conscious Parenting: Mindful Living Course for Parents - Nataša Pantović Nuit

Mindfulness Training: Mindful Living Courses Content Methodology Mission at Goodreads

Source: www.goodreads.com/story/show/527721-mindfulness-training-alchemy-of-love
Like Reblog Comment
url 2017-04-20 11:52
Mindful Being Course Available for Free: Check our Giveaway
Mindful Being - Nataša Pantović Nuit

Mindful Being Course Available for Free Giveaway. Maybe you could be the lucky winner! Check it out!

Source: booklikes.com/giveaways/show/2439/mindful-being-natasa-pantovic-nuit
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-18 05:55
Dead Interviews: Living Writers Meet Dead Icons
Dead Interviews: Living Writers Meet Dead Icons - Dan Crowe

Several modern day writers answer the question, if you could go back in time and talk to any famous writer, who would it be? by imagining how such interviews would go.

 

Some are straight-forward, some are really very clever, like the Samuel Johnson/Boswell interview imagined by David Mitchell, or Rebecca Miller's take on how an interview would go with the Marquis de Sade.  Some of them aren't even authors; Douglas Coupland interviews Andy Warhol, who he imagines finds heaven very dull.

 

I bought this because I saw Sir Arthur Conan Doyle on the list and he's just about the only author I'd travel back in time to talk to, if I could.  Ian Rankin did the honours, but I was rather disappointed with his efforts, to be frank.  Very little came out of the exercise except perhaps a wicked hangover for Rankin if he was lucky, a court-ordered psych eval if he wasn't (fictitiously speaking, of course).

 

The weirdest by far was Joyce Carol Oates' disturbing and intensive extended grilling of Robert Frost.  I think it's fair to say, fictional imaginings or not, she does not like Robert Frost!  At the end of it, she is careful to remind readers it's a work of fiction, "though based opon (limited, selected) historical research", and then points the reader in the direction of Meyer's biography of Frost.  I'm betting there's a story to tell there somewhere.

 

It's an amusing collection of what-ifs, some of which, like with all such things, are better than others.  

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-17 07:39
Octopussy and the Living Daylights
Octopussy and the Living Daylights (James Bond, #14) - Ian Fleming

This is Fleming’s second Bond short story collection, published posthumously. I’m sort of sad (but not really) that I’m at the end of my Bond reading journey. It’s been an interesting couple of months.

 

#1 OCTOPUSSY: 2.5* A tale of avarice and treachery told via a flashback within a flashback. Thrilling stuff. (Not really. Bond was hardly in it. He didn’t even have time to say or think something bigoted, racist, or misogynistic.)

 

#2 THE PROPERTY OF A LADY: 2.5* This one involves mild international intrigue at an auction. Also, Bond gets more than enough page time to think misogynistic thoughts about an unattractive, flat-chested Russian double agent.

 

#3 THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS: 2* In which Fleming once again works overtime to prove that Bond is “too good for murder”. Decent twist at the end, but the extra dose of sexism, including but not limited to the crack about how girls should play the cello “sidesaddle”, effectively cancels out any points the twist might’ve garnered.

 

#4 007 IN NEW YORK: 1* A super-short and pointless story about Bond’s polite contempt for New York City. Includes a recipe for scrambled eggs. Make sure you have a good English toast rack on hand. Heaven forbid you serve the eggs with “dank” toast.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?