logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: mysteries
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-19 21:03
First in the Series
Death by Chocolate Lab - Bethany Blake

I thought the name of the title was funny (criteria for me to choose to read it). It was a cute story about two sisters sharing a house together and their mother, a realtor. The youngest sister holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy and runs her own dog walking/sitting business. Her older sister is a veterinarian who is driven to succeed, like their mother, the realtor. The night before dog show for agility, the younger sister, Daphne is watching out her window while the people show up to set up for the next day. She sees her sister, Piper, giving a thermos of coffee to a man that she doesn't like. Later the next day, Daphne finds him dead in a tunnel. She doesn't want to see her sister as the person of interest in the murder and starts to find out the truth for herself. Along the way she learns many secrets of the people in the town she grew up in. She also learns that people will talk to her about what they know or what they suspect. She also keeps searching for the murdered man's dog that has gone missing following the murder. She also develops a relationship with the new detective in town. 

 

I did borrow the 2nd book in the series and am curious to see how things continue as Daphne is "involved" with two different men and she seems to be trying to figure out her own life. I know that as I write there are only in three in the series, so I don't know if I will read them all or not, but I did enjoy the story a little, but I just felt that Daphne needed to be more adult and not needing rescue from her constant running out of gas and leaving places without paying for meals. 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-18 13:48
Soupcon of Poison
A Soupçon of Poison: Kat Holloway Victorian Mysteries (Kat Holloway Below Stairs Mysteries) - Ashley Gardner,Jennifer Ashley

Author: Jennifer Ashley 

Series: Below Stair Mystery .5

Rating: 3.5 stars

 

This novella is the start to Jennifer Ashley's new historical mystery series.   

 

In case you don't know, Jennifer Ashley aka Ashley Gardner also writes The Captain Lacey Mysteries. I have raved about the Lacey mysteries since I began reading them a couple of years ago.

 

This new series, called the Below Stairs series, has been picked up by Berkeley and the first book Death Below Stairs came out on January 2nd of this year.

 

Death Below Stairs (A Below Stairs Mystery) by [Ashley, Jennifer]

 

I am excited to read it, especially after finishing this novella. In it, we meet Kat Holloway. She is a cook who becomes entangled in a mystery when her employer dies after eating a dinner she has prepared. Holloway sets about trying to clear her name. To help her, there is a young boy named James and his patron Daniel- a swoon-worthy addition to the cast and obvious love interest. Make no mistake, Daniel and his past are the true mystery here. I like how Ashley develops his character, dropping hints as to his background. I have an idea of what might be going on with him as he's definitely not what he appears to be, but I'm not sure and can't wait to read the first book to get more information. 

 

The mystery was decent - not her best after reading so many of the Lacey books, but it was a nice introduction to the characters and made me want more.

 

Recommend. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-01-18 13:04
Reading progress update: I've read 96 out of 384 pages.
Schilf: Roman - Juli Zeh

 

Sebastian = Faust

 

Oskar = Mephisto, der Faust zugleich verführt und bei der Suche nach der absoluten Wahrheit überflügeln will -- er braucht jemand, den er besiegen kann.

 

Dass das Krankenhaus hinter der Entführung von Liam stecken soll, glaube ich keine Sekunde.  Das geht auf das Konto des Obermanipulators Oskar.  Geh zur Polizei, Sebastian.

 

Die Physik ist window dressing.  In Wirklichkeit geht es um ein schnödes Machtspiel.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-01-14 23:15
Detection Club Bingo: My Progress So Far
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books - Martin Edwards
The Golden Age of Murder - Martin Edwards
Murder of a Lady (British Library Crime Classics) - Anthony Wynne
The Tales of Max Carrados - Ernest Bramah,Stephen Fry
Pietr Le Letton - Georges Simenon
Lonely Magdalen: A Murder Story - Henry Wade
Margery Allingham Omnibus: Includes Sweet Danger, The Case of the Late Pig, The Tiger in the Smoke - Margery Allingham

 

1. A New Era Dawns: Ernest Bramah - The Tales of Max Carrados

2. The Birth of the Golden Age
3. The Great Detectives:
Margery Allingham - The Crime at Black Dudley, Mystery Mile, Look to the Lady, Police at the Funeral, Sweet Danger, Death of a Ghost, Flowers for the Judge, The Case of the Late Pig, Dancers in Mourning, The Fashion in Shrouds, Traitor's Purse, and The Tiger in the Smoke
4. 'Play Up! Play Up! and Play the Game!'
5. Miraculous Murders:
Anthony Wynne - Murder of a Lady
6. Serpents in Eden
7. Murder at the Manor:
Ethel Lina White - The Spiral Staircase (aka Some Must Watch)
8. Capital Crimes
9. Resorting to Murder
10. Making Fun of Murder
11. Education, Education, Education
12. Playing Politics
13. Scientific Enquiries
14. The Long Arm of the Law:
Henry Wade - Lonely Magdalen
15. The Justice Game
16. Multiplying Murders
17. The Psychology of Crime
18. Inverted Mysteries
19. The Ironists
20. Fiction from Fact
21. Singletons
22. Across the Atlantic
23. Cosmopolitan Crimes: Georges Simenon - Pietr le Letton (Pietr the Latvian)
24. The Way Ahead

 

Free Square / Eric the Skull: Martin Edwards - The Golden Age of Murder

 

The book that started it all:

Martin Edwards - The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books

 

The Detection Club Reading Lists:
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: The "100 Books" Presented
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 1-5

The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 6 & 7
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 8-10
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 11-15
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 16-20
The story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 21-24

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-14 22:42
Well, I can see the appeal to movie directors ...
The Lady Vanishes & the Spiral Staircase (Wordsworth Classics) - Ethel Lina White,Keith Carabine
The Lady Vanishes - Ethel Lina White
Some Must Watch - Ethel Lina White

... but in written form, this isn't really my cup of tea.  Which isn't necessarily the fault of White's writing is such -- she has a fine eye (and ear) for characterization and language -- but rather, of her chosen topic.  I've never been much of a fan of "women in peril" stories; they tend to be replete with fevered agitation and hyperbole, and however understandable the protagonists' fear and excitement may be in a given situation, the situation as such is almost invariably so unrealistic as to be the literary equivalent of "B movie" material.

 

That being said, Hitchcock definitely milked The Lady Vanishes (which was originally published as The Wheel Spins) for all it was worth and then some -- in fact, this is one of the rare examples where I decidedly prefer the movie over the book: not only because Hitch gave the story a spin that isn't present in the literary original at all (even if that doesn't make the story one iota more realistic -- it's just plainly more fun), but chiefly, because Michael Redgrave's version of Iris's (the heroine's) knight in shining armour is decidedly more likeable than the character from the book, who -- even though he's meant to be likeable -- to me just comes across as one hugely condescending a$$hole, hardly any better than the professor in whose company he travels.  Similarly, Iris herself is more likeable as portrayed by Margaret Lockwood in the movie: whereas there, I am genuinely sympathetic to her strange plight, the book mostly elicited my rage at her fellow passengers' reactions -- however not on Iris's behalf specifically but on behalf of womanhood generally, against a society that automatically disbelieved and put down as hallucinations and figments of an overactive imagination any woman's assertions that weren't supported -- or that were even directly contradicted -- by other witnesses, especially men and / or figures of authority.  (In fact, if I hadn't read Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper, biographical background information included, I'd have dismissed the whole premise of The Lady Vanishes as wildly improbable.  Sadly, at the time of its writing, it wasn't.)

 

The Spiral Staircase (originally published as Some Must Watch) combines a remote country house setting on the Welsh border with a serial killer story; and if the isolation of the house and the prowling maniac weren't enough in and of themselves, the whole action takes place over the course of somewhat less than 12 hours, mostly after nightfall.  I haven't seen any of the several movie adaptations of this story, but I can see how a clever director would be able to ratchet up the tension quite skillfully here, what with the dwindling down of effective defenses against the maniac and a cast of fairly outlandish (and unlikeable) characters inside the house -- if you buy into the premonition that this house is where the serial killer is headed next, and that he is after the book's heroine, to begin with.

 

I liked The Spiral Staircase a bit better than The Lady Vanishes -- 3 1/2 vs. 2 1/2 stars, respectively, which averages out to 3 stars for both together.

 

The Spiral Staircase (under its original title Some Must Watch) is mentioned as an example of a country house mystery in Martin Edwards's The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books, so I'll be counting that towards the corresponding square of my Detection Club bingo card, and both books, in addition, also towards the Women Writers Bingo.

 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?