logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Paranormal-Mystery
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-07-16 01:41
A Ghostly Light (Haunted Home Renovation Mystery, #7)
A Ghostly Light - Juliet Blackwell

Not sure what it was, but something was missing from this one.  I still enjoyed it, still found it a fun read, but, I don't know, it just wasn't as good as so many others in the series.

 

I'd sort of forgotten about the romantic shakeup that happened in the last book, so I had some catching up to do, but overall, I think the change is for the better; it added a tiny bit of zest to the character development, and it needed it.

 

This book brings back a couple of characters from Keeper of the Castle (coincidentally the book in the series I found to be the weakest), but this time Mel's working on restoring a lighthouse off the coast of San Francisco, and before she can even get started she finds the client's ex-husband dead at the bottom of the lighthouse stairs, and a ghost whose hobbies include pushing men down stairs.

 

A big theme in this book is Mel's acquired acrophobia and how she's struggling to deal with it.  This didn't interest me all that much, to be honest, and maybe it was a contributing factor to my slight ennui about the book overall.  There were too many scattered themes that just didn't weave together very tightly.  The book, taken as a whole, felt unfocused.

 

But the mystery was pretty good; I enjoyed the story about the light keepers and the tie-in to Treasure Island was the highlight of the whole thing.  The murder mystery was...not bad, but given the lack of focus, I'm not sure I can recall any actual investigating that Mel did, so that the big reveal at the end depended on last second deductions and the cooperation of the killer.  It worked, but it failed to have much of an impact.

 

I'm far from being soured on the series, but this isn't the strongest of the lot.

 

 

 

 

 

Total pages:  314

$$:  $9.00  (location multiplier)

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-06-23 08:33
Sweep in Peace (Innkeeper Chronicles, #2)
Sweep In Peace - Ilona Andrews

I'm a huge fan of Ilona Andrews' writing (or, at least, her Kate Daniels series) so I was inclined to like this to start with; it's a testament to her writing that I did in spite of the undercurrent of science fiction running through the storyline. 

 

I'm not sure if I should admit that my favourite character is Caldenia, but she is.  She gets all the best lines and if not for the cannibalistic tendencies, she might be my literary heroine of choice.  But Dina is no slouch either and while there's never any doubt she has the abilities, her overwhelming innkeeper mandate sometimes makes her a bit trod-upon, so that final scene was awesome.  It's nice to see her abilities balance out; that she can be as bad as she can be good.

 

I never doubted for a minute who Turan Adin really was, it could never have been anyone else, but I couldn't figure out how Andrews was going to explain the timing.  Once she did, I was left wondering what the vampires and hoard thought about the "mysterious creature".  I also thought it interesting that Andrews dropped a huge clue about Dina's brother but then never followed up on it; ditto the clue about what happened to her parents.  I suppose they're saving that for book three.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page count: 301

$$: $6.00

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-06-21 12:05
Nightshade for Warning (Enchanted Garden Mystery, #2)
Nightshade for Warning - Bailey Cattrell

I had been looking forward to this book, because I was pretty impressed with the first one. Although I'm a fan of Cattrell's other work, I really fell for this series' backdrop of a woman who creates a beautiful garden and uses what she grows to distill her own essential oils, mixing custom perfumes in her small shop.  I'm not overly interested in the perfume angle, but the gardening and the tiny house she lives in all sound, not to put too fine a point on it, enchanting.

 

This sophomore entry doesn't disappoint as far as the garden and the distilling goes, and the slight hint at paranormal gifts that was in the first one is expanded upon here, but there's a love triangle in the making, which is always disappointing.  Luckily, the murder mystery was pretty good; the resolution managed to take me almost completely by surprise.  

 

I'll definitely read a third one, if it's in the offing, and there's a recipe for lavender shortbread in the back of this one I'm itching to try.

 

 

 

 

 

Total pages: 306

$$:  $6.00

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-06-13 11:45
Review: The Turn
The Turn: The Hollows Begins with Death - Kim Harrison

I received a copy from Netgalley.

 

Since The Hollows is one of my favourite urban fantasy series, and probably one the series that got me hooked on urban fantasy in the first place, a prequel to the Hollows was a must have. I put in a Netgalley request as soon as I saw it. (Even though I’m only up to book 7 in the series).

 

Though after reading it, I can’t honestly say I liked it all that much. It was okay, somewhere between a two and a three star read for me. The first half of the book was full of science stuff that I found incredibly boring and a slog to get through. I’ve never DNFed a Kim Harrison book before, so series and author love made me determined to finish it.

 

 I found it quite confusing, it didn’t help also that I could have sworn there was a Trent Kalamak in the Rachel Morgan series. It was only when I was reading reviews on Goodreads and saw the questions about this book section that someone else had asked the same thing that was puzzling me. Not the same character, two different characters (though there was a ding! moment towards the end of the book that made me go aaaah, that’s why).

 

One or two familiar characters also popped up, demon Algaliarept (who’s name I can’t pronounce to save my life) was his usual delightfully obnoxious (and somewhat amusing in a snarky way) self and Quen.  One of the vampires makes an appearance towards the end as well.

 

This is all about two dark elf scientists who are fighting it out for funding, Trent and Trisk, both of whom hate each other, Trisk’s created a genetically engineered tomato that will supposedly end third world hunger. Forced to work together each have their own separate agendas. As I said, the first half was all very technical and the two of them playing off each other to get to their own goals. (I had to keep reminding myself this was set in the 60s as well). Favourite classic songs are on the radio as new music.

 

But of course, jealousy rears its ugly head and one thing leads to another, something goes hideously wrong. This resulting in a wide spread disease that nearly wipes out the human race, bringing out the fear and repercussions of a bunch of vampires, witches and other species trying their best to get head of it and survive as well.  While at the same time Trisk and a companion, the Dr who created the virus in the first place, there’s links to her genetic tomato, and Trent trying to keep on top of things.

 

The second half was much more exciting as things went from bad to worse and Trisk and her friends try to fix the problem. There’s something – satisfying is not the word I’d use – but there’s definitely a so that’s how it all happened feeling about now knowing how The Hollows all started, but it’s certainly not a favourite novel. Though I am glad I read it, and would certainly recommend to Hollows fans.

 

Thank you to Netgalley and Gallery, Threshold, Pocket Books for approving my request to view the title.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-06-04 02:04
Paws and Effect (Magical Cats, #8)
Paws and Effect - Sofie Kelly

It does't sound good that my favourite character in this series is Fred the Funky Chicken, but it's true.  The other characters are all likeable in the best cozy-mystery way, but my heart goes out to Fred the Funky Chicken every time.**

 

I'm not going to pretend that this book isn't everything a modern cozy is; the magical cats pretty much give the game away.  But Kelly does't over-play that magical hand and doesn't try to hide the deux ex machina-like effect this has on her ability to plot her mysteries.  She also creates likeable, believable, characters that enjoy a reasonable amount of realistic conflict; some of which is resolved and some of it isn't.  

 

The murder plot was decent-ish.  I was side-eyeing the murderer for awhile but there weren't any puzzle pieces to play with, just one big whopper of a clue that solved the whole thing for everybody at once.  Or at least, for the reader and the MC; everyone else would need more proof, of course, thus allowing our MC to stumble into mortal peril.  A reader comes to understand this is the nature of cozies though, and at least this peril was believable.  Sort of.  (How did the murder find them??)

 

So Paws and Effect is everything you'd expect a contemporary cozy to be anymore, but better than most of the rest; a bit more solid and well written.  A fun, fluffy bit of fiction for lazy afternoons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page count:  315

$$:  $3.00

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?