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review 2017-09-12 03:46
An instant attraction that kept me reading.
Breakaway - Sophia Henry

I did not want to stop reading this story. Luke's past and how it affected him then and now touched my heart. Bree's openness, honesty, and generosity had me cheering for this couple. There were times when I had tears in my eyes, when a giggle escaped unguarded, and when I held my breath that it would be too much. These two are meant to be together, and I cheered for them. I highly recommend this book as well as the series, and I look forward to more from this author.

I received a copy of this book through Netgalley, and this is my unsolicited review.

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review 2017-09-05 12:34
Score
Breakaway - Sophia Henry

I absolutely loved this book by Sophia Henry. This is a great series, but you don't have to read all of the books to before to follow along but it is nice to. Bree is a nurse that wants to get away from her troubles at home so she takes a job in North Carolina. Luke Daniels is a player for the NHL team the aviators and he was injured and has been rehabbing and hoping to get back in the ice but he learns that it is a career ending injury. These two are great together and seeing how they make each other grow and learn to move on. This is one of my foavirites of this series.

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review 2017-08-02 08:05
Book Blitz - Power Play

Power Play
Sophia Henry
(Pilots Hockey #2)
Publication date: February 16th 2016
Genres: New Adult, Romance

In Sophia Henry’s blistering follow-up to Delayed Penalty, hailed as “sexy, fun, and full of angst” by L. P. Dover, a good girl and a hockey hunk face off against expectations—and this match is guaranteed to see plenty of action.

Beneath her innocent facade, Gabriella Bertucci has her reasons to be standoffish with guys. Especially guys like Landon Taylor, a star defenseman on the minor-league Detroit Pilots and the object of a serious crush since he first walked into her family’s market. But when Landon comes through for her in a moment of crisis, Gaby starts to wonder if there might be more to Landon than hard muscles and fast skates.

Landon isn’t afraid of telling Gaby that he’s got it for her bad. The problem is, she seems unwilling to believe it. And though Landon enjoys his reputation as a cool-headed athlete, he hates losing—both on the rink and off. It’s his competitiveness that makes him so damn good at what he does . . . but it also makes him just a little bit complicated.

One minute Gaby’s tempted to give in; the next, she’s getting cold feet. How can she trust a guy who’s destined for bigger and better things to stick around? Then again, when Landon pulls her close with those powerful arms, the only thing that matters is right now.

Goodreads / Amazon / Barnes & Noble / iBooks / Kobo

 

EXCERPT:

 

Intro: Gaby works at a store that Landon’s family have been patrons at for years, so they’ve known each other on a friendly level. In the second chapter, Landon tries to prove to Gaby that he isn’t a stranger. They have a natural, easy way with each other and great banter. This is a scene with a fun exchange between Gaby and Landon. This snippet comes from end of the scene after Gaby grills Landon with questions—all of which he answers correctly.

 

From POWER PLAY:

 

“How did you know that?” I glanced past him. A slight movement outside the door had caught my eye, but no customers walked through.

 

“Told you we weren’t strangers.”

 

“You’re creeping me out. Seriously.” I thought I held the championship belt for scary stalker. At least I had a reason: Landon Taylor, my vote for sexiest man alive and hottest hockey player in the AHL. But there was no reason for him remember random facts about me. “I’m not—anything.”

 

“Or maybe you’re everything.”

 

“What?” My brain didn’t have the capacity to wrap itself around everything going on right now. My dad had a heart attack. My crush alludes to me being everything—whatever that means. Can’t think. Storage limit maxed out.

 

“I pay attention when it comes to you, Gaby.”

 

“But why?” Surreal couldn’t even begin to describe this moment.

 

“You were my first kiss.” After sprinkling that confusing seed in my head, Landon spun around and walked out. Through the front window, I watched him thread his fingers together behind his head and raise them toward the clouds in a stretch as he disappeared from my line of sight.

 

 

 

 

This is book # 2 in the Pilots Hockey series.  While this book can be read as a standalone, I always recommend to understand series books to read them in order.  This is a good series and deserves your complete understanding.
 
Gabriella AKA Gaby has been in love with Landon for as long as she can remember.  When he helps her with her father's heart attack, she starts to see maybe he cares for her also.  Can they learn to trust and maybe start something for the future?
 
Landon has had the hots for Gaby as long as he can remember.  They grew up right near each other and he has been attracted to her the whole time.  Every one seems to know it but Gaby.  Can he convince her he is serious?
 
As they get to know one another the fires start to have a slow burn.  I really like this book and how the characters get a feel for one another before they turn up the heat!  Such a sweet and romantic story.  I give this book a 4/5 Kitty's Paws UP!
 
 
***This ARC copy was given by Netgalley.com and its publisher in return for an honest review.

 

 

 

 

Author Bio:

 

Award-Winning Author, Sophia Henry, is a proud Detroit native who fell in love with reading, writing and hockey all before she became a teenager. She did not, however, fall in love with snow. So after graduating with an English degree from Central Michigan University, she moved to the warmth of North Carolina for the remainder of her winters.

She spends her days writing books featuring hot, hockey-playing heroes. When she’s not writing, she’s chasing her two high-energy sons, watching her beloved Detroit Red Wings, and rocking out at concerts.

Sophia's writes heartfelt and flirty fiction for readers who love the Mature Young Adult and New Adult genres. Check out her emotional and engaging Pilots Hockey series from Random House Flirt.

 

Website / Goodreads / Facebook / Twitter

 

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review 2017-03-27 20:52
An inspiring and enlightening book on the topic, not a fast read or a practical manual.
Smarter Faster Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business - Charles Duhigg

Thanks to NetGalley and Random House UK/Cornerstone for providing me with an ARC copy of this book that I voluntarily choose to review.

I don’t read many self-help or how-to books although recently I’ve been reading some that intrigued me and this was one of them. After all, who doesn’t want to be smarter, go faster and do things better? We all want to be productive, so the title was a big hook for me, and I imagine I’m not alone.

Charles Duhigg is the author of a very popular, well-liked and positively reviewed book, the bestseller The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do, and How to Change. Although I noticed that many of the reviewers mentioned his previous book and drew comparisons, I haven’t read it and I won’t be able to add to that debate. (In short, a few of the reviewers felt that this book wasn’t as good or as useful, from a practical point of view, as the previous one). After reading the comments, now I’m curious about his previous book.

But, as for Smarter Faster Better, it is a book where the author explains how he started wondering about the different levels of productivity people obtain. We all know individuals whose days seem to last more than 24 hours if we’re to judge by the amount of activities and achievements they manage to pack in. In an attempt at trying to find out how they do it, Duhigg collected studies, reviewed theories, interviewed people, checked stories… The book, which is divided into a series of chapters (Motivation, Team, Focus, Goal Setting, Managing Others, Decision Making, Innovation, Absorbing Data, Appendix and Notes), consists of the discussions of some cases that Duhigg then uses to illustrate a point or theory about the particular item and its importance. On talking about motivation, Duhigg uses the case of a young man who didn’t know what he wanted to do with his life and eventually decided to join the Marines. He explains how their training focuses on making them attach a meaning to their chores, ask questions that remind each other of what their goal is and what they are trying to achieve, and also the importance of feeling one has a choice. In the chapter about goal setting, he asserts the importance of having two types of goals, SMART goals (we’ve all read about those) but also stretch goals, overarching goals that look at something bigger, as, otherwise, we might end up with a list of tiny little achievable goals that don’t build up to anything. I enjoyed the examples used (that include, among other: the Toyota way of running a factory, focused on making people feel free to report mistakes and also share their ideas for innovations, teachers’ creative use of data about their students to transform a failing school into a successful one, and also include the use of mental images by airline pilots that help them make the right decisions when things go wrong), and the hypotheses and advice make sense to me. The book is well written, and although some examples and cases will feel more relevant to some people than others, there is a big variety and I personally thought they all made interesting points and some were fascinating, to say the least.

Some of the reviewers complained about the fact that the book is not very practical. The author includes, in the appendix ‘A Reader’s Guide to Using These Ideas’ (I wonder if this is in response to comments or it had always been there) that summarises the concepts in the book, and applies them to the author’s difficulties finishing this book. This summary sets up some of the points as more relevant to individuals, and some to companies or teams. I’ve noticed that there’s a summary of the book available for sale separately (here), and I wonder if it might consist mostly of this part of the book (as it says: ‘in less than 30 minutes’). Although I guess the advice can be found there, what makes the book memorable, at least for me, are the stories and that ties in with one of the points in the book about absorbing data. The absorption and understanding of data can be increased by creating disfluency, by having to work with it and making it less accessible. That obliges us to engage with the data and to make it ours, to make it matter to us and to find ways of using it that might not be evident or interesting to others. Therefore, if you have to read the book and go through the case studies, you might appreciate other points of the stories and remember the cases as they are relevant to you, rather than trying to remember a point as a headline with no context. So yes, if you can and are interested in the topic, I would advise reading the whole book (and it isn’t quite as long as it looks like, as there are detailed notes about the studies at the end that take up the last 33% of the book). If you have doubts, you can always check a sample of the book. But if you just want a taster, I share a quote:

Productivity is about recognizing choices that other people often overlook. It’s about making certain decisions in certain ways. The way we choose to see our own lives; the stories we tell ourselves, and the goals we push ourselves to spell out in detail; the culture we establish among teammates; the ways we frame our choices and manage the information in our lives. Productive people and companies force themselves to make choices most other people are content to ignore. Productivity emerges when people push themselves to think differently.

I’m not sure if this book will make a massive difference to my productivity, but it has made me reflect on a number of things and I’m sure I’ll keep thinking about it for a long time. If I had to choose a point in particular, I’d say  it has made me think about team and group dynamics, and I particularly liked the concept of ‘psychological safety’ (a “shared belief, held by members of a team, that the group is a safe place for taking risks”). If only…

In summary, an inspiring book, full of cases and stories that deserve to be read in their own right and concepts and suggestions that will mean different things to different people. It’s not a quick read or a ‘follow these few steps and you’ll be more productive’ kind of book, but it’s a well-written, researched and thought-out book that might help us understand better what makes us tick.

 

 

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review 2017-03-19 21:31
Electric Singularity by Debrah Deumont
Electric Singularity - Debrah Deumont

This didn't work for me. Theo, the master and the ship owner, was too dull, too slow for a successful smuggler and unnecessary brutal. And horny. Like all the time. Leon did all the work getting Theo out of trouble, and turned from I hate you to can't live without you in a span of an hour (tho based on what, I am not sure. Maybe his brain got fried too much.) I am that one spoilsport, sorry, but I can't give the story more than 1.5 stars. I am not sure yet if I want to round it up or down. Gonna sleep on it.

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