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review 2017-08-04 18:18
The devil is in the details
The Trouble with Goats and Sheep - Joanna Cannon

It's ironic that after I made the post about not finding enough time to post twice a week I exponentially increased how many books I was reading. This has resulted in a backlog of books which show as 'currently reading' on all of my literary social media sites. This has generally meant that the reviews which have been going up on Fridays are following in the order that I read them but I may have read them as much as two months ago. I'm going to change that up with this post because I'm just so excited to talk about this book that it's jumping the queue. Strap in, guys.

 

The Trouble with Goats and Sheep by Joanna Cannon was brought to my attention by watching this video by one of my favorite BookTubers, Mercedes. It was the cover that initially grabbed my attention (Honestly, are you even surprised anymore?) but it was the quick blurb which she read that truly won me over. (PS The UK and US covers are vastly different and honestly I prefer the cover from the UK.) Cannon's debut novel is set on a small road in England during the summer of 1976 and the winter of 1967. Two seemingly disparate events from these two time periods seem to be converging during what turns out to be one of the hottest summers on record. The reader follows several narrative threads from the inhabitants of this road but the central character is 10-year old Grace. We see her neighbors, family, and friend (Tilly is a delight) through her eyes while also getting to peek behind the shuttered windows and closed doors of their homes where secrets lurk in every corner. It started with a disappearance of a woman...or was it a baby? Maybe it was a fire that started things. It's sometimes difficult to determine just what started a chain of events, isn't it? The Trouble with Goats and Sheep explores that and much more. I don't want this novel to sound distressingly gloomy or dark because that's not accurate. It's difficult for me to convey just what it was that instantly drew me in and had me savoring it like a delicious treat. I think it's that Cannon was able to move seamlessly between the different characters and two time periods and create a story that was both believable and poignant. The people on the avenue felt real and tangible. Their foibles and fears weren't inconceivable or written with a melodramatic air. These were real people who had made mistakes but were too stubborn to admit them. It's a study of humanity and how two little girls tried to reconcile what they were seeing with what they desperately wanted to believe.  I knew within 30 pages that this was a book that this was going to have high re-readability for me and I daresay for many others as well. 10/10 highly recommend.

 

The UK cover:

Source: Waterstones

 

The US cover:

Source: Amazon

 

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2017-06-19 14:18
Louis I, King of the Sheep - Olivier Tallec  
Louis I, King of the Sheep - Olivier Tallec

With great accessories comes great stupidity. Or perhaps, Some sheep are more equal than others. Something about sheeple blindly following the edicts of a madman? And whether or not it was intentional, I like the wind bringing the crown as it brought Mary Poppins, and then, one day, it blows the other direction.

 

Also, I wonder if I have retained enough French to be able to read this in the original?

 

Library copy

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review 2017-06-05 17:07
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? - Philip K. Dick

I tried to write something resembling a coherent review, but I can´t come up with anything else besides the fact that I really enjoyed this book and the questions about humanity it poses. What makes us human? Empathy, compassion and love? And is artificial intelligence able to experience the same emotions as humans?

 

I really liked the significance that Dick puts on real life animals and how humanity is closely linked with these animals. And I really liked the concept behind the mood organ:

 

"My schedule for today lists a six-hour self-accusatory depression" Iran said

"What? Why did you schedule that?" It defeated the whole purpose of the mood organ. "I didn´t even know you could set it for that", he said gloomily.

 

Truth to be told I would choose a self-accusatory depression every once in a while myself. But I think it would be pretty great to choose when to have one of those.

 

I read this book for my jail visit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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text 2017-05-28 18:59
Reading progress update: I've read 193 out of 193 pages.
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? - Philip K. Dick

After having finished Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep and The Master and Margarita in one day, I feel like I´m stuck in a David Lynch movie. My next read will definitely be a non-weird one (eventhough both books were great reads).

 

I´ve read this book for my jail visit which means 193 pages are going into the jail library.

 

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review 2017-05-03 13:23
Measuring humanity
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? - Philip K. Dick,Robert Zelazny

I don't know whether to be hopeful or depressed. I think I'm a good deal of both, plus amazed, and horror stricken. There is a lot of the Sisyphean in this, which I guess is on purpose, given all the Mercer stuff (which on the last pages got trippy as fuck, of the religious hallucination variety).

 

And it makes a good job of running through many questions regarding empathy, psychological manipulation, human's social animal condition, loneliness, plus whatever I didn't get, inside few pages on an action packed day for a bounty-hunter.


Really intense little book.

 

Rachel hates him because he recognized her even while she couldn't recognize herself? (I'm unsure on this, she must have known to sleep with other bounty-hunters) Or maybe she hates him because it's another failure to fool a human, and can't understand where the failing lies.

She goes for the goat. But in the end, maybe his wife was more important. She actually cares and.. well, it felt hopeful to me. No pet, but why should you feel bereft if you can care for another person... which is a bit messed up and might be the reason Deckard is so messed up: HE doesn't care for HER.

Cyborgs are really terrifying because it's clear by the end that they are absolutely psychopathic. The spider makes you understand what the fact that they truly can't empathize really means. All the fripperies that have you in doubt make it even scarier. Of course, you have Irmgand so who knows?

(spoiler show)
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