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text 2019-01-21 06:32
Reading progress update: I've read 460 out of 784 pages.
The Complete Short Stories: Volume 1 - J.G. Ballard

13 to Centauri: Ultimately a disapointing story.

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review 2019-01-21 01:19
Srong Collection
The Birds & Other Stories - Daphne du Maurier

There are six stories in this volume and they all work on that eerie maybe-normal-maybe-fantastical/grothesque/horror line.

 

The Birds is excellent at suspense and the daily made unnerving. And it leaves you there.

 

Monte Veritá reads almost like one of those non-Cthulthu's Lovecraftian tales. I really like the beginning, and the maybe-magical-maybe-mundane and expansive tone. The thing is, though, that much like in Lovecraft's writings, I had issues... I don't know, it was not... It felt like it was written by a man trying to be fair-for-his time but still...

 

The Apple Tree was a perfectly done unreliable narrator. He makes you despise the dead woman, but at the same time, you can read between the lines his own "polite" chauvinism, and so you feel for her. And then the layers peel, and oh my. Another that treads the line between the real and the fantastical for disquiet, and it's a gruesome poison study that you can see coming and still...

 

The Little Photographer ... Well, talking about poison-study. Ennui does not make good councilors. A bit of tragedy with some karma.

 

Kiss Me Again, Stranger was the eerie of prototype modern goths with some sauce.

 

The Old Man is interesting because you don't question it.

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review 2019-01-20 16:50
Elevation by Stephen King
Elevation - Stephen King

What a different story from Stephen King!
When I sit to read  king book, I expect to be scared shitless. I at least figure he will take me to a scary place that is twisted and unique. Well, I got the unique part, and frankly, didn't miss the scary part.
It was such a cool little story because of the strange phenomenon that happens. It really made me wonder, 'what if?'. 
This story is now one of my favorites. The emotions I had mixed with master storytelling makes it a fantastic read! You should definitely read it too!

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2019/01/elevation-by-stephen-king-4.html
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review 2019-01-16 20:10
FINDING YOUR WAY BACK HOME IN A SLEEK JET FIGHTER ON A FOGGY CHRISTMAS EVE IN 1957
The Shepherd - Frederick Forsyth

This is an intensely dramatic and wonderfully told short story about a young Royal Air Force (RAF) fighter pilot's struggle to make it home to the UK from West Germany in his DeHavilland Vampire jet fighter on the night of Christmas Eve 1957. Frederick Forsyth - one of my favorite writers - was himself at 20 the youngest fighter pilot in the RAF little more than 60 years ago - and his evocation of the sensation and perils of flight in a sleek and swift, single-engine jet fighter, puts the reader both in the pilot's head as well as the cockpit.

Why "THE SHEPHERD" has not been adapted for the TV screen (to the best of my knowledge) escapes me.
  

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review 2019-01-16 18:43
In the Shadow of Agatha Christie / compiled by L. Klinger
In the Shadow of Agatha Christie: Classic Crime Fiction by Forgotten Female Writers: 1850-1917 - Leslie S. Klinger

Agatha Christie is undoubtedly the world’s best-selling mystery author, hailed as the “Queen of Crime,” with worldwide sales in the billions. Christie burst onto the literary scene in 1920, with The Mysterious Affair at Styles; her last novel was published in 1976, a career longer than even Conan Doyle’s forty-year span.

The truth is that it was due to the success of writers like Anna Katherine Green in America; L. T. Meade, C. L. Pirkis, the Baroness Orczy, and Elizabeth Corbett in England; and Mary Fortune in Australia that the doors were finally opened for women crime-writers. Authors who followed them, such as Patricia Wentworth, Dorothy Sayers, and, of course, Agatha Christie would not have thrived without the bold, fearless work of their predecessors—and the genre would be much poorer for their absence. So while Agatha Christie may still reign supreme, it is important to remember that she did not ascend that throne except on the shoulders of the women who came before her—and inspired her—and who are now removed from her shadow once and for all by this superb new anthology by Leslie S. Klinger.

 

A historically interesting collection of short stories by women in the crime/mystery genre. They are products of their time, published before the likes of Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers. Don’t go into this volume expecting the quality of those two talented women writers!

These are the roots of women writing in this genre from the late 1800’s into the early 20th century. If you’ve read books like Ann Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho or Wilkie Collins’ The Woman in White, you will have a fairly clear idea of what you are getting in this collection. The best part is that these are short works—there is no need to wade through the pages and pages of description that the reader encounters in the two novels reference above. You can sample and decide if there are authors whose work you wish to pursue further.

I put a hold on this book in my public library, believing that I would get more contemporaries of Ms. Christie, those who were writing “in her shadow,” so it wasn’t quite what I was anticipating. Still, it made an excellent book for coffee breaks, allowing me to read a whole story before having to set the book down & return to business.

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