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review 2017-04-30 21:56
Speak
Speak - Laurie Halse Anderson

I did not enjoy high school. When I hear about those who had 'fun', I always wonder how they managed to avoid bullying, lousy teachers, academic pressure, or the general angst adolescence brings.  But some enjoy it. Maybe they had the steel to survive the bullshit. Everyone is different. Most kids were just trying to get by. Like I was.

 

'Speak' is about one of those regular kids. In the summer before school starts Melinda gets assaulted by an older student at a party. She tells no one, and worse comes to worst she is also blamed for blowing the whistle on the party after the police arrive. So she starts high school being branded a snitch and her friends abandoning her. She has no one to tell the truth about that night. She had been raped.

 

As a reader I joined Melinda's odyssey through 9th grade. I have never experienced the horror of being raped, but the desolate pit that keeps growing in Melinda is something I do recognize. When trauma happens, the long days ahead become about survival. The past normalcy of your life is one you don't recognize anymore. 

 

The absurdity of high school is more enunciated to Melinda now. Like her I had flaky 'friends' who disappeared when cooler people came around, bullies who shoved you in the hallway, dumb football coaches as teachers, and rigorous courses catering to standardized testing.

 

But there is some light that shines through. It happens for Melinda and it happened for me. Her art class and the sweet relationship with her art teacher makes me emotional each time I read it.

 

Trauma doesn't happen to everybody, and it shouldn't happen to someone so early. Melinda has to learn to 'speak' about what happens to her. She has to understand there are people who care and people who want to listen. That is the first step forward. And she makes it happen.

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review 2017-04-15 18:10
For police procedural lovers looking for characters they can relate to. And some great secondary players.
Marred - Sue Coletta

I’m reviewing this book as part of Rosie’s Book Review Team and was provided with a copy of the book that I freely chose to review.

I read and reviewed Sue Coletta’s Wings of Mayhem, book one in The Mayhem Series (check the review here), and was impressed and intrigued. Now, on the occasion of the launch of the second book in the Grafton County Series, Cleaved (yes, I’m reading and reviewing that too, try and stop me!) I managed to catch up with the author’s first book in that series, that chronicles the lives of Sage and Niko Quintano, a couple who now live in Grafton County, New Hampshire, where they took refuge after something horrific happened to Sage. Niko is the new sheriff and Sage is a successful author of crime novels, although, unfortunately, she ends up playing the part of the victim in real life more than once.

Sage and Niko are trying to recover from their personal tragedy, as Sage lost a baby she was carrying when she was assaulted but they are both keeping things from each other, in an attempt at protecting the other. During the book, they’ll realise they are stronger together and the best way to beat evil is to be honest with each other and to share the truth, however hard it might be to hear.

The novel has strong elements of the police procedural genre. Niko is an accomplished detective, although sometimes hindered by his personal feelings and his inability to see and accept the unacceptable, and as there are not as many crime fighting means in a small town, he gets to share his expertise (his training one of the deputies gives the reader the perfect opportunity to eavesdrop and learn, although it might be a bit too much detail for those with no appetite for the grosser things in the art of detecting) on issues such as blood spatter and how to process a crime scene. Frankie, his fiery and fashion conscious deputy, is a fabulous character who takes no prisoners and tolerates no fools. Sadly, that means she has little opportunity for career advancement, as tact is not her strong suit, but through the novel, we get to understand her better, see her softer side, and she’s great at one-liners and gritty and witty repartees. Although Niko might complain about Frankie’s evident disdain for authority, he enjoys the banter and their relationship is one of the fun and lighter elements in the novel. The crimes are gruesome, bizarre and puzzling, as it appears the killer is trying to send a message but nobody knows what it is or who the intended recipient might be. There are red herrings and confusion, as it becomes clear that these crimes relate to what happened to Sage years back, in Boston, but we don’t know how or why. Lies and withholding of information don’t help and Sage does a fair deal of amateur investigating too.

Apart from the police procedural aspect, there are also other elements that give the novel a distinct flavour. The strong relationship between the couple and their shared (at least in part) trauma plays a big part in the action and also in the reactions and behaviours of the characters, that at times might stretch reader’s suspension of disbelief but would fit in with somebody trying to survive to a horrible ordeal. This is not the typical novel about the lone detective, who lives only for his work and solving cases but is totally unable to have a meaningful relationship. Thanks to Sage’s memories we share some of the couple’s high and low points. Pet names, real pets and home life (including thoughts about the laundry) ground the characters and their relationship making them more relatable and real, rather than just case-solving automatons. Sage’s otherworldly encounters (she consults a spiritual guide and has a very special experience during the investigation, but I won’t spoil the story) are also outside the norm for a book otherwise very realistic and detailed.

The story is told from the points of view of several characters. Sage’s point of view is narrated in the first person and that makes the reader identify with her more closely. She is also a writer through and through and observes everybody around her, everything that happens and analyses her own thoughts and feelings in detail. Niko and Frankie are also given a narrative, although theirs is in the third person but still manages to make us see their different perspectives, helps us understand their behaviours and thought processes, and provides more information the readers can try and use to put together the jigsaw puzzle.

The book has a great sense of rhythm, and alternates very tense and dark scenes with moments of light relief (Frankie and the other deputies are always at hand with some strenuous comment or mishap, Sage and Niko also have their humorous moments and the novel is tongue-in-cheek about possible comparisons, including comments about Castle) and is particularly effective at dropping the readers right into the action and making them share the experiences and emotions of the characters.  The ending manages to be satisfyingly upbeat while also introducing a final disquieting note.

A recommended reading for those who love detailed police procedural novels (and TV series like CSI, Criminal Minds and yes, Castle), with characters who carry a heavy baggage, in a backwoods/small-town setting and with less down-to-earth elements thrown in too. A strong stomach is a necessary requirement. I’d also recommend it to writers keen on the genre as there’s much to be learned from the author.

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text 2017-04-09 19:30
Pies and Hot Cowboys Yeehaw
Lost Rider (The Coming Home Series) - Harper Sloan

4 swoon-tastic stars

Hot hunky damaged man, with rippled abs cowboy, who dumps his life breaks a few hearts and searches for redemption in the heart of his childhood friend, that he nearly destroyed. Their bond to each other is strong but the damage is deep and dense with scar tissue that may not ever be softened. There is hot cowboy riding, smoking hot kisses, and swoon worthy moments galore is this first book in a series I am looking forward to continuing. 

The female main character. Leighton, owns and operates a bakery called The Pie Hole. She makes delicious pies for work and fun. Who wouldn't love her and want her every happiness ? She is the girl you want you want at your back, trust worthy loyal and steadfast. She loves pure and hard, but her trust is not so easy to earn back once it's been shredded and broken. I just loved her.

Maverick, this boy can pull his inner jerk out. He may be a uber hot cowboy but he acted like a massive donkey. He had good reason, he just never told anybody about the reasons. He preferred to carry that chip on his shoulder and darken his life even more. He was down and digging a deeper hole. Till life kicked him one time too many and he was forced to return to his center and realign everything in his life. 

Very enjoyable read. I liked the characters, felt for them, could relate to them, would like any of them as friends, that is a winner. 

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review 2016-11-16 23:21
Vampires, Werewolves, shifters, necromancers and witches oh my.
Cupcakes, Trinkets, and Other Deadly Magic - Meghan Ciana Doidge

Vampires, Werewolves, shifters, necromancers and witches oh my.  It was a cute cozy type para-mystery read with a few grizzly bits, a good introduction into this world of baked goodies and supernaturals.

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text 2016-11-15 18:04
Reading progress update: I've read 90%.
Cupcakes, Trinkets, and Other Deadly Magic - Meghan Ciana Doidge

Yes you are stupid !!! Dumb as a stick, dumb dumb dumb.... oh but my sister, my sister..ARGUH sisters can be the worst !

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