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review 2018-11-09 12:18
Numenor: Unfinished Tales" by J. R. R. Tolkien
Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-Earth - J.R.R. Tolkien,J.R.R. Tolkien

(Original Review, 1980-10-13)


The new Tolkien book is out. While I haven't read even half of it, I think I've read enough to produce a helpful review, so here goes. This book ("Unfinished Tales" by JRR Tolkien, $15 from Houghton Mifflin) is definitely not a book for a general readership, nor even for the mass Tolkien consumer, who thinks that Lord of the Rings is a swell story, but all that linguistic and historical stuff is just a lot of window-dressing. Rather than a narrative, it's really a sort of organized memory dump of Tolkien's filing cabinet [2018 EDIT: “filing cabinet” indeed!!!].
 
 
 
If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.
 

 

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review 2018-10-23 21:13
Deacon by Kristen Ashley
Deacon (The Unfinished Heroes Series Book 4) - Kristen Ashley

I have a weakness for mountains and cabins and the pictures of Colorado mountains always leave me breathless. You can already guess that I liked the setting a lot. As in a lot. 
Cassidy was a great character. She was independent, hard-working, and fearless. She loved what she did and to my relief she wasn't obsessed with clothes, shoes, jewellery, or makeup. She wasn't a kickass like Sylvie, but she also wasn't a doormat like Anya and Hanna. She was confident and knew what she wanted and also went after it with all her passion. 
Deacon was cold and mysterious at the beginning, but attentive and caring when they started their relationship. You have to love the man, who cleans the gutters without you nagging endlessly about it. After Grant, who had so little page space, but turned out to be the biggest asshole, Deacon was like a breath of fresh air. And this man had a past. I was sobbing like crazy while reading about it. 
Now about the story. The fist half of the book was amazing. I liked the pace of the story, how it flew and gave me time to enjoy getting to know the main characters. I liked to read about Cassie fixing the cabins and laughed when every time John Priest came back, the price of the cabin had gone up. The sex scenes were emotional and you could feel the bond between Cassie and Deacon. I also enjoyed their banter and the way they discussed things. 
The second half of the book wasn't so enjoyable any more. There were too many sex scenes and they started "playing" in the bedroom. After that vanilla flew out of the window and all these numerous scenes were about bondage, spankings, and anal sex. The storyline somehow disappeared, I couldn't feel the emotional bond anymore. I started skipping sex scenes again. The only likeable things were that they "played fair", so Cassie wasn't the only one tied to the bed and both main characters accepted the other as they were. 
Am I disappointed I read it? No. Am I going to reread it in the future. I don't think so. But I'm looking forward to reading Nick's story and I hope that there is more about Marcus Sloan and Daisy. 
Oh, by the way, the scenes in a supermarket, I can totally relate to.

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review 2018-09-10 13:56
good book and characters
Unfinished Business - Carolyn Ridder Aspenson

Angela loves her husband , she has a teenage daughter -Emily- and a young son-Josh, a best friend-Mel- sick father, and the ghost of her dead mother. Angel has a fairly normal family with normal family drama and issues. After her mother-Fran- died Angela is devastated but then she finds out her mom   won’t go to the light and appears to Angela and Angela thinks she is going crazy. . Angel’s husband was the love of her life. HAer mother and Angela makes sure Emily os OK when there is some serious danger to her. Fran isn’t the only ghost that appears to Angela and they obviously see Angela who can help them get closure on their human life. Fran pushes Angela to help the ghosts and offers her advice. Fran tells Angela she has unfinished business and she came back to help Angela. Angela’s dog Gracie and young son Josh can see Fran also. Angela gets use to seeing her mom;s ghost and her ability also grows and now she sees ghosts wherever she goes and Angela feels the responsibility to try to help the ghosts.

I enjoyed this book I liked Angela and her family.and how they normal they are other than Angela seeing first her mother’s ghost then other dead people’s ghost. I think this should have been in Angela’s POV. I liked that Angela freaked out a little when she seen her mother's ghost and then there ghost. I liked the author handled the problem of drugs and peer pressure. I choked up at ties while reading this. I love hoe Angela and Mel interacted with each other. I really liked the plot. I loved the characters and the ins and outs of this book and recommend it.

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text 2018-06-12 15:43
The latest reading choice I'm facing
Young Wilhelm: The Kaiser's Early Life, 1859-1888 - John C. G. Röhl

In a few weeks I'm traveling to my in-laws's farm for my summer vacation. I'm looking forward to it for many reasons, not the least of which is the uninterrupted hours of reading time I have while I'm there (my in-laws are generous in that way and many others). This, of course, then raises the question inevitable question of what to bring to read.

 

This time I'm not approaching it as a question of limited availability once I'm there; I have some books there left over from my last trip there, and I'll probably bring a paperback or two from my Star Trek novel stack. This time it's more an issue of what to prioritize among my current interests. Among them is the first volume of John Röhl's biography of Wilhelm II, which I started reading three years ago and DNF'd a fifth of the way in. t was a fine read, but its size limited my ability to take it with me to read while I was out-and-about and other priorities intruded. Miranda Carter's recent New Yorker piece about Wilhelm has definitely increased my interest, though, and with my desire to read more modern European history for the fall semester this seems like a prime opportunity to make this my main selection.

 

Unfortunately my interests as always spin in multiple directions at one. I also have a biography of Georges Clemenceau that has long gathered dust on my shelf, and which has the added virtue of greater portability, as well as one of Raymond Poincaré right next to it which might be an even more important read. David Weber's book on Spain's empire in North America is also looming large given my upcoming Southwestern history class, and there are also a couple of other titles on German history which seem appealing. Fortunately I still have some time to work all this out, but I'm hoping to do so before it becomes one of those last-minute panic issues.

 

So, which book would you be most interested in seeing reviewed?

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review 2018-05-27 10:32
Quantum Ontology: "What is Real - The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics" by Adam Becker
What Is Real?: The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics - Adam Becker

The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality.

 

 

 

The diversity of possible comments on this book reflects ironically the Everett paradigm of quantum ontology. There are as many views of reality as there are observers. Thankfully in all instances, given the depth of some of the possible interpretations, the interaction of the observer state wave and that of the rest of the universe is extremely asymmetrical - the universe has a great effect on the observer but the latter's effect on the universe is mercifully, infinitesimally small. There is no doubt that the philosophical implications of the developments in modern scientific thinking are in lagging mode. This is because of the extreme complexities of the formalisms created to describe the reality as seen by human observers with a certain evolved sense of perception. The modern philosopher has to tread wearily through the theory before emerging tired and almost at wit's end to be in a position to even expound a valid opinion, least of all an emerging new philosophy, on the ontological basis of the quantum world. This is the first time I’ve read a book on Quantum Mechanics wherein three of the major outlier physicists appear: David Bohm, Hugh Everett III, and John Stewart Bell. 

 

 

If you're into the Measurement Problem in Quantum Mechanics, read on.

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