logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: AG-Howard
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-19 14:06
Justice Howard's Voodoo Conjure and Sacrifice by Justice Howard, Writings by Voodoo Queen Bloody Mary
Justice Howard's Voodoo: Conjure and Sacrifice - Justice Howard

Have you ever wanted to know more about Voodoo? I mean the real Voodoo, not the Hollywood version? This book takes you on a journey so to speak through the world of Voodoo and its practitioners. Hollywood usually gives Voodoo a bad name, when in actuality it is a religion. It is thought to be the oldest religion. Voodoo was born in Ancient Africa and came across the world during the Slave trading days.  

 

This book is also not just a journey through the written word. The book is filled with photo's. Yes some have full frontal female nudity, some have severed animal heads, and snakes lots of snakes. The nudity is not done in a Playboy manor, it is beauty, it is Voodoo. 

 

There is so much to learn from this book about Voodoo. Justice Howard has done an amazing job along with Bloody Mary, a Voodoo Queen in New Orleans. Between the stories, legends, explanations, and pictures you get the true meaning of Voodoo. This book is a basic version of Voodoo but it gives you enough to know the true meaning of this religion.

 

I received this book from the Author or Publisher via Netgalley.com to read and review.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-05-27 16:45
An efficient Star Trek adventure
The Covenant of the Crown - Howard Weinstein

Howard Weinstein is a prolific author of Star Trek franchise novels, and if his first one is any guide it's easy to see why. In it he provides an efficient tale of a planet whose Klingon-sparked civil war is winding down and who needs their exiled king to return to cement the peace. Due to his personal connection with the king James Kirk is ordered to transport him to his homeworld, only to arrive to find the monarch near death. To salvage the mission, Kirk must retrieve the all-important crown and convince the king's reluctant daughter that she has the strength necessary to assume the throne — all while dealing with a Klingon battlecruiser and Klingon intelligence operatives who are determined to do everything within their power to stop the Enterprise crew form fulfilling their mission.

 

The plot of Weinstein's book is not that different from that of an episode of the original series, which often had the Enterprise crew intervening in the planetary politics of strategically important worlds. What Weinstein does is put Leonard McCoy at the center of events and expand the scale beyond what was ever possible in the series by making it a truly interstellar tale, with journeys to multiple planets, spaceship pursuits, and struggles with alien fauna. While Weinstein does not draw any great moral from the tale, he does nonetheless provide readers with an engaging adventure, one that is fresher for its scope and its concentration on a previously under-utilized character.

Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-05-26 00:06
Obey the Skull! Listen to its tales, then play its games!
Tales from the Magician's Skull - Howard Andrew Jones
"Behold! I have fashioned a magazine like those from fabled days of yore. It overflows with thrilling adventures. There are swords, and there is sorcery. There are dark deeds and daring rescues. There are lands where heroes fear to tread." - The Magician's Skull speaks in Kickstarter


Should you trust a talking skull? Well, no sane person would, but I attest this Skull does not lie. Tales from the Magician's Skull #1 spawned from a successful 2017 Kickstarter Campaign in which Howard Andrew Jones (Sword & Sorcery guru, author, and RPGer) teamed up with Joseph Goodman of Goodman Games, publisher of Dungeon Crawl Classics. The resulting magazine reflects this partnership, marrying great stories with suggested RPG game items. As a backer and enthusiast of fantasy fiction, I couldn’t be more pleased.

QUALITY: The quality is great (the artwork, editing, illustrations, paper-feel etc.); this magazine is just fun to hold.

APPENDIX: The Appendix! What a great design idea! To drive home the RPG elements of the stories, these guys created items and rules related to each story for the Dungeon Crawl Classic RPG. This is really cool. read the stories...then go play them. 

ILLUSTRATIONS: Ooh, the illustrations are nice and varied. For Enge’s story, Russ Nicholson drew a full page, very reminiscent of his drawings for the Fighting Fantasy gamebooks. Many full page, detailed illustrations decorate the interior (by artists: Jennell Jaquays, Doug Kovacs, William McAusland, Brad McDevitt, Ian Miller, Russ Nicholson, Stefan Poag, and Chuck Whelon).

STORIES
1) "What Lies in Ice" A Gaunt and Bone story by Chris Willrich - For me this was 3-stars, but I think YA-adult and lit-RPG (literary RPG) readers will enjoy it more. For a short story, this has a huge party of protagonists (>6), heavy doses of comic relief, and an overabundance of fast-paced story telling that shoots for ADHD action scenes rather than elements-that-build-on-each other. It reminds me of a Marvel Avengers movie. It has too much in it to allow an old fogie like myself enough to grasp on to, but it does have a lot of neat things going on (as disjointed as they are). My favorite concept/creature: Hands of the Sea (which is the first item in the Appendix!). 

Sharing my thoughts on Goodreads prompted the Sword & Sorcery crowdassured me that followers of Gaunt and Bone will enjoy this since it ties together other G&B yarns.

2) James Enge's "The Guild of Silent Men : A Story of Morlock Ambrosius". 5-star! Although less action than the previous story, this fantasy-murder mystery delivers more than enough swords-n-sorcery while fleshing out Thain Morlock's background and motivations. A fun read that also serves to make me want to learn more. Perhaps I should go get Blood of Ambrose right now. 

3) Bill Ward's "Beneath the Bay of Black Waters” A Tale of Shan Spirit Slayer and the Banner General Bao" - 4-stars. I'm a big Bill Ward fan (i.e., his anthologies like 
Mightier than the Sword and Last of His Kind). This Asian/Orient adventure is led by an entertaining duo tracking a drug trade (of Black Pearls, being mysterious narcotics) from the Fish-Gutter gang. Death escapes the protagonists more than it should, but the story is great. 

4) Aeryn Rudel's “Beyond the Block” - 5 stars. A first-person perspective was perfect for this undead horror. Another duo stars, this time its Lucinda and her brother Matthais (the narrator). Matthais is a blacksmith who seeks to defend Lucinda from Lord Magister Vyard (a sorcerer who wants something of Lucinda’s magical potential).

5) Howard Andrew Jones’s “Crypt of Stars, From the Chronicles of Hanuvar Cabera" has one primary hero: Hanuvar of the Volani. It's him against the invading Dervani who are out to raid his ancestral cemeteries. I am a big HAJ fan, having followed his blogs and Black Gate articles and enjoyed his fiction (i.e., The Bones of the Old Ones). He never disappoints. 5-stars.

6) C.L. Werner's "There Was an Old Fat Spider” offers a biased protagonist, Karl, who may be an anti-hero. A knight and civil protector Rudolf Goettinger tracks Karl down in this Germanic/Gothic tale that reminded me of Werner's Warhammer tales. Lots of gray areas here. Good grimness. 4-stars.

7) John C. Hocking’s “The Crystal Sickle’s Harvest. From the World of the Archivist." Another police-like duo lead this mystery: Thratos (mentor Hand of the King sorcerer) and Benhus (young mentee, warrior sorcerer). Thieves are breaking into royal crypts, but not necessarily to steal. Why? Some neat Magical Weapons are presented, i.e., the Nobleman's Comfort (magical wand, and its in the Appendix). Best of all, this story has a talking skull! But is it THE skull? 5-stars.

VOLUME #2 promises more of the great quality, and it is nearing publication (June 15th 2018). I suggest you join the Legion of the Skull, whether you like to read, play RPGs, or both.

Source: www.selindberg.com/2018/05/tales-from-magicians-skull-review-by-se.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-04-19 23:15
Tea's TBR Thursday - April 19, 2018
Under His Kilt - Melissa Blue
A Perfect Holiday Fling (Moments in Maplesville) - Farrah Rochon
Confessions of a Prairie Bitch: How I Survived Nellie Oleson and Learned to Love Being Hated - Alison Arngrim
Cheer Up Love: Adventures in depression with the Crab of Hate - Susan Calman
You Can't Touch My Hair: And Other Things I Still Have to Explain - Phoebe Robinson,Jessica Williams
Dueling the Desperado - Mimi Milan
Are You There Coffee? It's Me, Mom - Kianna Alexander
Cafe Au Lait - Liane Spicer
An Uncommon Protector - Shelley Shepard Gray
Howard Haskell Takes a Bride - Merry Farmer

I haven't done a TBR meme post in a while due to being in limbo about the status of our leaving England's shores for the US - turns out we are staying put a year, so we will be moving next summer. So I have lots of time to get through all the books I stuffed my NOOK and Kindle with. At least I can focus on grad school applications now.

 

Anyway a bunch more books were added to my TBR pile (which now stands at 257 ebooks) in the three weeks I haven't done a TBR post.

 

Added to NOOK:

1. Frey by Melissa Wright

2. The Robber Bride by Jerrica Knight-Catania

3. Verity, Clarity, Adversity, and Purity (Cursed series #1, 1.5, 2, 3) by Claire Farrell

4. Marrying Miss Marshal by Lacy Williams

5. Wishful Romance, Volume 1 by Kait Nolan

6. The Sweetest Thing by Lilan Darcy

7. When You Got a Good Thing by Kait Nolan

8. Once Upon a Campfire by Kait Nolan

9. Bitter Roots by C.J. Carmichael

10. Down Deep by Virna DePaul

11. Atlantis Riptide by Allie Burton

12. Love Like This/For Now and Forever by Sophie Love

13. The Duke in Denial by Alexandra Ainsworth

14. Once Upon a Christmas (anthology) by Various Authors

15. Lone Star Love (anthology) by Various Authors

16. You Can't Touch My Hair by Phoebe Robinson

17. Cheer Up Love by Susan Calman

18. A Search for Refuge by Kristi Ann Hunter

19. On a Cold Christmas Eve by Bethany M. Sefchick

20. The Chef's Mail Order Bride by Cindy Caldwell

21. His Prairie Princess by Kit Morgan

22. Catherine Finds Love by Karla Gracey

23. Brony's Destiny by Karla Gracey

24. A Bride for Carlton by Karla Gracey

25. Winter Eve by Lia Davis

26. Opal by Juliet James

27. Under His Kilt by Melissa Blue

28. The Prequel by Mona Ingram

29. Return to Love by Christine Kingsley

30. Star King by Susan Grant

31. A Perfect Holiday Fling by Farrah Rochon

32. Bruised by Stacey-Deanne

33. Desperate by Sylvia McDaniel

34. Rocky Mountain Haven by Vivan Arend

35. A Dangerous Nativity by Caroline Warfield

36. Rebel Cowboy by Nicole Helm

37. Stardust by Kristen Strassel

38. Doc's Town by Cheryl Phipps

39. Pride of Africa by Tori Knightwood

40. Strange Tango by Michelle Dayton

41. Spring in Sweetwater County by Ciara Knight

42. An Uncommon Protector by Shelley Shepherd Gray

43. The Lieutenants Online Love by Caro Carson (technically a pre-order)

 

Added to the Kindle:

1. Undeniably Yours by Becky Wade

2. Café Au Lait by Liane Spicer

3. The Corner of Forever and Always by Lia Riley

4. Confessions of a Prairie Bitch by Alison Arngrim

5. Dueling the Desperado by Mimi Milan

6. The Dancing Lady by Mimi Milan

7. Howard Haskell Takes a Bride by Merry Farmer

8. The Mango Season by Amulya Malladi

9. A Radiant Soul by Kianna Alexander

10. Drifting to You by Kianna Alexander

11. Are You There Coffee? It's Me, Mom by Kianna Alexander

12. Welcome to Last Chance by Cathleen Armstrong

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-03 11:13
After the End of the World
After the End of the World - Jonathan L. Howard

[I received a copy of this book through Netgalley.]

This novel picks up where the previous one left (if you haven’t read it yet, stop here), or roughly, after Emily Lovecraft and Daniel Carter, alogn with Detective Harrelson, have been stranded in the Unfolded world for a few months, slowly adjusting to their lives in Arkham-instead-of-Providence.

And it’s not easy, because even though the Unfolded world is fairly similar when it comes to daily life (and better, in some ways, as in when Emily realises she own a nice house here instead of renting a flat), in many other ways, it is tremendously different. For starters, World War II ended much sooner, when the Third Reich dropped an A-bomb on Moscow in 1941, obliterating its whole leadership; and the Reich is now one of the world’s superwpoers, having been accepted because, well, the Holocaust didn’t concerned Jews but Communists, and for some reason this was much more acceptable to the West who turned a blind eye and ha-hemmed in a corner while it happened. Which infuriates Dan and Emily just as much, a different kind of evil still being evil after all; also, the Nazis are welcome in the USA and racism much more prevalent, so the Unfolded world isn’t so peachy for Emily herself.

(On a side note, I wish we had seen more of that. I don’t enjoy racist slurs in the least, but in terms of ‘show, don’t tell’, it never felt like Emily was really ostracised, apart from a couple of instances when some Gestapo guy said ‘who’s that black down there’ or something to that extent. In turn, the ‘lessons in political correctness’ given at times didn’t have the impact they could’ve had.)

The world is definitely not right by our heroes’ standards, who want nothing more than bring back its Folded version, but have no clues where to start… until Emily finds out she has the Necronomicon in her safe, Henry Weston is at his shenanigans again, and Daniel gets hired to spy on a joint German-US project in Miskatonic University. Weird stuff ensues, veering into spy-thriller-weird more than HPL-weird at first, but no worries, the latter is never too far behind.

Although I was hesitant at first about the spy thriller part, probably because of its apparent simplistic aspects (US vs Communists or US vs Nazis, it’s kind of the same... also Nazis make easy enemies: Instant Evil! Just add water!), the way it was handled was all in all interesting, in part because, let’s be honest, it makes for contrived enemies… but it also makes for entertaining scenarii. In fact, it reminded me of the Call of Cthulhu/Adventure! Crossover RPG I had played a few years ago, as well as of Indiana Jones movies, and I soon found my bearings again in that kind of plot and setting. We get typical but useful ingredients: scientists working on a secret project infiltrated left and right by Gestapo, Abwehr and probably a few others (Daniel even manages to throw the CIA in all that, and it blends in perfectly); research influenced by esoterism; evil cultists who’re all the more evil because they treat sacrifice as if it was a mere bureaucratic matter; a secret research facility on a remote island in the Pacific Ocean; not exactly human beings; and this mix works fairly well here.

Another thing I liked was that the focus shifted slightly in this book from Dan to Emily. We already know by now of Dan’s ancestor and the abilities he’s inherited, and there was a solid risk of Emily remaining more of a sidekick (a badass one, but a sidekick nonetheless) when it came to the weird/non-Euclidian parts. Well, let’s just say that reading can indeed empower people. (I bet you can already tell where this is going.)

Conclusion: 4 stars, it was an enjoyable read in spite of the few peeves I had about it, and I breezed through it, and now I want the next instalment.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?