logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: high-school
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-05-17 07:25
Susannah's Garden
Susannah's Garden - Debbie Macomber

This is the 3rd book in the Blossom Street Series and it is also my favorite book in the series.  I'm not sure what it is about this book that makes me like it so much but I've read it 4 times (that I can remember).  I guess maybe it is because there is a mystery to be solved and I love mysteries.  I often have a hard time staying interested in books when there isn't a mystery. 

 

This book takes the reader away from Blossom Street when Susannah learns her widowed mother is not doing as well as she thought living alone.  She decides to go stay with her mother for a while and see how she is doing for herself.  She soon realizes her mother needs to be moved to a long-term care facility.  She was especially concerned when her mother tells her that her dead husband is coming to see her.  

 

Susannah also has another mission too, one she did not tell her husband about.  She wants to find her high school boyfriend and find out why he suddenly left and where he went.  While looking through her father's desk she uncovers some things that her father was keeping secret.  Together with one of her friends from high school they start to put the pieces together.

 

While Susannah is dealing with those things her daughter is home from college for the summer and decides to come and help her mom with her grandmother.  She ends up hooking up with a troublemaker that is the son of someone Susannah went to school with.  Susannah is sure he is dealing drugs and doesn't want her daughter to be involved with him but trying to talk to her daughter only causes more problems.  Her daughter is just like Susannah was when she was that age and she is learning how her dad must have felt.  

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-28 00:35
A Good Yarn
A Good Yarn - Debbie Macomber

I just finished listening to the audiobook for this today. I'm loving Hoopla digital.  Up until last weekend, I rarely left my house.  I ordered books on amazon.com or from paperbackswap.com.  My books showed up in the mailbox and one of my sons would bring them to me and even open the box for me.  I spend a lot of days in bed in too much pain to move around much.  I send out my used books using paperbackswap's printable postage so I don't have to go to the post office. I just print the wrapper, wrap it up well and stick it in the mailbox.  In the wintertime, my boys take the books out to the mailbox for me.  If you've never heard of paperbackswap, it is a great website for swapping used books.  When someone requests one of my books I wrap it up like I mentioned above, paying media mail postage, and then I get a credit that I can use to request a book I want. I don't have to pay anything other than the credit to request a book.  

 

Anyway, last weekend I was feeling a bit better and wanted to go out for lunch with my husband. He was surprised.  After that, we went to the library and renewed our library cards. I haven't used mine for years. My husband's card was so old he had to get a new card but I just needed to update and get a sticker for mine.  When I got home that day a friend online mentioned Hoopla digital and I downloaded the app.   I've now listened to 2 audiobooks and it was nice to be able to just rest in bed when I wasn't feeling well and just listen.  

 

A Good Yarn

 

 

Linda Emond does a wonderful job reading.  Her voice is easy to understand and easy to listen to.  This is a heartwarming story of Lydia's second year running her knitting shop, A Good Yarn. She decides to have another knitting class, this time teaching how to make socks using two circular needles. When I read this book the first time I also made the sock pattern from the front of the book which has instructions for the 5 needle method also. It is neat when you understand exactly what they are talking about when they are at the knitting class. When they were struggling I understood.

In this story, the characters are all dealing with their own struggles. Elise, a retired school librarian, invested in a new home only to learn the contractor filed for bankruptcy. Now she is wrapped up in a class action suit and she had to move in with her daughter. Bethanne woke up on Valentine's Day to her husband asking for a divorce and now has to find a job so she can help support her 2 teenaged children. Courtney, a young girl whose mother died in a car accident, has to move to Seattle and live with her grandmother for her senior year. She is overweight and is feeling so sad and alone. She misses her family and her friends in Chicago. Lydia and her sister also have their own issues to work through but they are there for each other. Lydia never thought she would be so close to her sister. She also has the 3 ladies from her first knitting class that has become great friends. Together, these women all help to support each other through their difficult times and grow closer in the process.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-10 22:29
Don't Kiss the Messenger
Don't Kiss the Messenger - Katie Wood Ray

I loved everything about Don't Kiss the Messenger!  For me, this story was very much driven by the varied cast of characters.  I loved that they weren't cast as ideals, but with the flaws and hangups that we all can relate to.

 

CeCe Edmonds was in a devasting crash that left her scarred in what was probably the worst place for a girl/woman... her face.  For her entire life, she had to endure the stares, the comments, even the outright cruel jeers.  Eventually, she learned to cope by accepting it and herself as she was, dealing with it with a combination of humor and outright badassery.

 

Emmett Brady is the new guy at school, popular and gorgeous.  But he also has his own story and his own baggage.  CeCe is instantly attracted to him, but does nothing about it because she knows there is no way someone like him would ever consider being more than friends with someone who looked like her.

 

And this belief is solidified when he meets Bryn DeNeuville, the new girl.  Bryn is CeCe's friend, but her polar opposite.  Where CeCe is into interesting music and thought-provoking literature, Bryn is all about everything that is popular.  And she has set her eyes on Emmett.  The only problem?  He seems to be the one guy she can't talk to OR relate to.  So, she turns to CeCe to help her.

 

It is Cyrano de Bergerac all over again, but modernized and set in the world of teenagers.  There are emotional ups and downs, funny moments and sad.  There were times when I wanted to jump into the book and talk some sense into one character or another.  It is a story that really makes you think about love, relationships, friendships, real beauty, and what it means to be true to yourself.  An amazing read!

Source: thecaffeinateddivareads.multifacetedmama.com/?p=12749
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-03-25 05:03
Georgia Peaches and Other Forbidden Fruit
Georgia Peaches and Other Forbidden Fruit - Jaye Robin Brown

Word of Caution: If you hate the Big Misunderstanding trope, then avoid this book, because the entire thing hinges on it. Not only is it a "big misunderstanding" but it's perpetuated by one character consistently lying to everyone, and not even for a very good reason. Well, she thinks it's a good reason. Me? Not so much.

 

This is the second F/F book in a row with a punk lesbian. I guess this is a common enough thing to already be a recognizable trope? Aren't there country-loving lesbians? Or jazz-loving lesbians? Or hip-hop loving lesbians? WHERE ARE MY HIP-HOP LESBIANS?

 

But seriously, this book is both complicated and simple. It's told in a simple, rather straightforward way that rarely delves into the depths that this book could easy delve into given the subject matter, mainly how do LGBTQ+ individuals who need faith in their lives deal with the hurtful messages that too many churches STILL put out there because they're stuck in medieval times. I was looking forward to that aspect of it, because too often the one sole religious person in M/M books often acts like he or she could be an offshoot of the Westboro Church family tree. I know many people of faith, some who are close-minded in that way, but others who really embrace Jesus's teachings about acceptance and loving each other without judgment. So let's look at both sides of the spectrum and everything else in between here, right?! Except it never really happens. *sigh*

 

Jo's dad, who runs his own evangelical radio show, accepted his daughter without hesitation when she came out to him. And now that he's remarried and his new MIL has a stick up her butt about EVERYTHING, and because they've moved to a more conservative, smaller town, he asks Jo to lay low. That is, go back in the closet. And she agrees. So she can get her own radio show that she unironically calls "Keep It Real." I say unironically because she's completely unaware of the irony of the title while she's lying about herself to everyone around her. 

 

Except one boy she meets and befriends. She tells him immediately. Which pretty much pulls the rug out from under her every other time she tries to explain to herself why she can't tell the truth to her girlfriend she's so super in love with. Oh, no! Can't do that! And it leads to one ridiculous, cliched "twist" after another until I just wanted to smack her Cher-style.

 

 

Oh, Cher. Where are you when we need you most?

 

I do like the various different characters. There's a weird subplot with Dana. It was nice to see how Joanna and Elizabeth eventually work out their issues. When Joanna does finally stand up for herself, that's pretty great too but comes a bit too late in the story, so that everything after that is rushed. Joanna overall is a passive character and except for that one moment of backbone, she never really stops being passive. Barnum was great, as were George and Gemma. The pastor of the other church, the not-friendly-to-gays one, has this weird quasi-transformation, maybe? It doesn't really go anywhere. 

 

So I guess there's a hopeful message in here. And I guess this is eventually about being true to yourself, even when that self isn't who you originally thought it was. But for each thing I found to like, there was another thing that annoyed me in equal measure.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-11 03:09
Just Juliet
Just Juliet - Charlotte Reagan

This was just okay. It was all very...nice. And simple. And low angst. All problems were safely in the past. All new problems were easily surmounted and quickly put behind them.

 

The first third was promising. Lena finds out she's attracted to a girl, doesn't freak out, does some googling and instead of going GFY figures out she's bisexual. So that was good. The James's are a great, fun, close-knit family. Lena and Juliet's first date was pretty rad and adorable.

 

And then it just sort of meanders and keeps going way past the point it should have ended because there really wasn't much of a plot. It goes through all the tradition coming out tropes - telling the bestie, telling the family, telling the world - but there's no real emotion to anything. We're told what Lena's feeling, but I never felt it myself. Scott and Lakyn were...confusing. Scott is a well-rounded character and very mature and provides Lena with some good advice. Lakyn, who has been through some terrible times, is shy and a jerk and whenever he speaks, I kept seeing him as twelve instead of seventeen. But as a couple, other than being the cute gay couple, they didn't really add anything to the story.

 

The writing is technically pretty good, though dry, just a few stray typos and just one or two questionable word choices. There's a lot of telling in the later part of the book, versus showing. The characters are pretty one-note, and the way Lacey, the "token black kid," is introduced doesn't get improved upon as the story progresses. I know all these kids are, well, kids, but even my friends weren't throwing around this many sexist slurs when we were that age. Every single time any girl (usually Lacey) did anything questionable or assertive or not-nice, she's described as bitchy. Really? I don't know if the author is aware of the "black girls are more promiscuous" stereotype, but Lacey unfortunately inhabits that too. And the gay "jokes" were pretty terrible and also usually spoken by Lacey. Lacey just gets terrible treatment through most of the book. For a "gay friendly" book, there is a lot of low-key homophobia. 

 

This started promising but just became meh by the end and I had to force myself to finish.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?