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review 2017-07-24 01:17
Ride the Pink Horse-Atmospheric noir
Ride the Pink Horse - Dorothy B. Hughes

Ride the Pink Horse is all about atmosphere.  You see the whole setting and the characters in black and white as you read.  You can smell the sweat and you can feel the heat. Along with the sweat and the heat, the feeling of anxiety, helplessness, and despair are palpable.  I’d never read anything by Dorothy B. Hughes before, but this story shows her to be a master of the noir genre.  My highest compliment to a book is that you are there while reading it and this one puts you there. It wouldn’t have worked anywhere but in the time and place that Hughes put it. The setting, a fiesta in New Mexico, is as clear as if you were watching it on television.  The reader is deeply inside the head of the protagonist, a petty thief from Chicago.  You find yourself feeling anxious along with him and hoping for the downfall of the crime boss (a senator) that he is pursuing. 

This book is of its time and there are some racist passages so read it with the understanding that it was published in 1946. 

This book was provided by Netgalley which does not affect my honest review and rating of it.

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review 2017-07-01 18:50
The Unexpected Mrs Pollifax by Dorothy Gilman (Audiobook)
The Unexpected Mrs. Pollifax (Mrs. Pollifax #1) - Dorothy Gilman,Barbara Rosenblat

Series: Mrs. Pollifax #1

 

Mrs. Pollifax is a widow in her sixties with grown children who has been feeling down in the doldrums and rather without purpose lately. So she decides to try to live out a childhood dream of becoming a spy by showing up at CIA headquarters and asking to be one. Through a somewhat ridiculous series of events she gets her wish and is tasked with some courier work while posing as an American tourist in Mexico.

 

This book was preposterous but fun and Barbara Rosenblat’s narration was great, especially Mrs. Pollifax’s voice. A few too many people die for me to call this a cozy spy thriller but if the idea of a grandmotherly spy tickles your fancy, you may want to check it out.

 

I read this for the booklikes-opoly square Adventureland 26 “Read a book tagged genre: adventure or thriller”. The Unexpected Mrs. Pollifax was tagged thriller on GR so I decided to count it despite having already started it. I had calculated that based on 204 pages for a print edition, discounting the first 30% that I had read yielded 144 pages or $4 to add to my bank. This brings my total balance to $168.

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text 2017-06-19 17:58
U.S. Kindle Sale: Miscellaneous
The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club - Dorothy L. Sayers
The Golden Compass - Philip Pullman
All Creatures Great and Small, All Things Bright and Beautiful, and All Things Wise and Wonderful: Three James Herriot Classics - James Herriot
Jack of Shadows - Roger Zelazny
And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic - Randy Shilts,William Greider
Silent Spring - Rachel Carson,Linda Lear,Edward O. Wilson
Cheaper by the Dozen - Frank B. Gilbreth Jr.,Ernestine Gilbreth Carey

Currently $1.99: The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club, by Dorothy L. Sayers.  The Golden Compass (aka Northern Lights), The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass, by Phillip Pullman.  Jack of Shadows, by Roger Zelazny.  Cheaper by the Dozen, by Frank Gilbreth and Ernestine Gilbreth Carey.

 

Currently $2.99: Three James Herriot Classics (All Creatures Great and Small, All Things Bright and Beautiful, and All Things Wise and Wonderful), by James Herriot.  Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh.

 

Currently $3.99: And the Band Played On, by Randy Shilts.  Silent Spring, by Rachel Carson.

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review 2017-06-13 19:11
Clouds of Witness / Dorothy L. Sayers
Clouds of Witness - Dorothy L. Sayers

Rustic old Riddlesdale Lodge was a Wimsey family retreat filled with country pleasures and the thrill of the hunt – until the game turned up human and quite dead. He lay among the chrysanthemums, wore slippers and a dinner jacket and was Lord Peter's brother-in-law-to-be. His accused murderer was Wimsey's own brother, and if murder set all in the family wasn't enough to boggle the unflappable Lord Wimsey, perhaps a few twists of fate would be – a mysterious vanishing midnight letter from Egypt ... a grieving fiancée with suitcase in hand ... and a bullet destined for one very special Wimsey.

 

Dorothy Sayers works seem to me to be perfect for anyone who enjoys the writing of Agatha Christie and P.G. Wodehouse. Sayers imparts an acerbic edge that keeps things from getting too twee. She manages to make sharp observations on both the gentry and the socialists, sometimes at the same time. I’ve recently been cataloguing the works of H.G. Wells, who wrote a lot about socialism in the early 20th century, and I find Sayers’ insights on the complicated societal changes of this time period to be spot on.

She isn’t gentle with her fellow authors either. I loved the following exchange, heard by Lord Peter while dining at the Soviet Club:

The authoress was just saying impressively to her companion: '-ever know a sincere emotion to express itself in a subordinate clause?'
'Joyce has freed us from the superstition of syntax,' agreed the curly haired man.
'Scenes which make emotional history,' said Miss Heath-Warburton, 'should ideally be expressed in a series of animal squeals.'
'The D.H. Lawrence formula,' said the other.


Poor old Lawrence, maligned again for trying to express what he considered to be real emotions and realistic human behaviour in his novels.

For some reason, it made me think of Dilbert, when his pointy-haired boss decrees that, “starting today, all passwords must contain letters, numbers, doodles, sign language, and squirrel noises.”

Being unable to express my review in either animal squeals or squirrel noises, I must tell you in English that this series is worth trying.

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review 2017-06-08 06:39
Dorothy and the Wizard In Oz (Oz #4) by Frank L. Baum
Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz - L. Frank Baum

Had to delete the blog review because it kept showing a larger picture of the book. Being the perfectionist I am sometimes, I just deleted it because it was getting on my nerves and I couldn't figure out what was going on. lol

 

I did enjoy the book, as I always do with the Oz books. Glad to be gradually working my way through these books. It was good to see many of the old characters from the first few books and of course some new ones.

 

Hopefully I will be able to get a couple more finished before the end of the year and can finally say I have a total of two bind ups/6 stories finished. :)

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