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text 2018-01-30 08:18
Movie Theatres on Wheels!

Cinetransformers is a unique Event management agency which initiated its venture with mobile movie theatres. The concept behind this approach was to reach to the remote locations which did not had the facility of entertainment. The initiative of Cinetransformers kicking reeling buzz in the field of entertainment.

 

  • Mobile Movie Theatres

Cinetransformers is a patented 53 feet double expandable trailer that can be easily converted into a mobile movie theater. It hardly takes an hours’ time to erect and is fortified with modern amenities such as entrance and exit ramps, ticket booking counter, restrooms, popcorn vending machine and access for disabled and provision of AC climatizer. It is a replica of theater with seating arrangements of 91 people in one single show.

 

The possibility and avenues of mobile movie theater has undergone immense transformation. Now the services of Cinetransformer is been used at film festivals and it creates exciting impact on the audiences. Services of Cinetransformer has created source of income for the organizer and has proved to provide marketing and re marketing opportunities. The brand benefits from the personalized branding by customized Cinetransformers vehicles which is in transit from one location to another or at venue. The potential reach of the sponsors are enhanced by been promoted among the people and it reaches to social media channels.

 

Conclusion

 

With their unique approach, Cinetransformer have established themselves as prestigious brand activation agency among the list of the best event planning companies. The reputed brands have entered into collaboration with Cinetransformer to hire their exclusive services.

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review 2018-01-23 22:29
Richard Burton: Prince of Players (Munn)
Richard Burton: Prince of Players - Michael Munn

This biography of Richard Burton is, I would guess, highly unreliable as to details. Although Michael Munn, the author, was indeed in the entertainment business in minor capacities, I very much doubt he had the kind of access to Burton himself (or to his circle) that would allow him to quote, apparently verbatim, whole stretches of actual conversation so very focused and illuminating about Burton's life. My suspicion that in fact Munn was paraphrasing cribbed versions of secondary sources was confirmed when I compared his account of an incident involving John Gielgud with Sheridan Morley's Gielgud biography, and discovered word-for word-borrowings but written as if told to the author directly by Burton (the tip-off was the idiosyncratic phrase "idiot boards"). That said, Munn does seem to have had some access to Burton (though not perhaps in the chummy way he claims), as well as to some of the more notorious gossips in Hollywood like Roddy McDowall. He also actually gives us a bibliography of sorts, though only a "selected" one; so I suspect he did his reading.

 

This, then, was a quick read with a hefty dose of salt, reliable for at least the bare outlines of Burton's career, and likely also a pretty good reflection of the gossip about Burton over the years. It's not a very happy tale. Indeed, given whatever illness of the mind (or brain) he was suffering from, as well as his lifelong alcoholism, what strikes me about Burton is not the brevity of his working life but the fact that he managed to get as much good work done as he did.

 

I was relieved to read that despite his reputation of having slept with every leading lady he had, Julie Andrews (who shared the stage with him in "Camelot") was notoriously proof against his boozy charms.

 

There's got to be at least one better biography out there, and I remember hearing that Burton's own diaries have been published, so I may come back to him at some point. I'm really far more interested in Peter O'Toole (upon the subject of whom this particular book was pretty light, though apparently they were quite good friends), but reading this book has at least revived in me the desire to go back and watch "Becket" again.

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review 2018-01-13 17:33
Witching Hour Theatre - Jonathan Janz
Witching Hour Theatre - Jonathan Janz

The venue where we watch our favorite horror movies has metamorphosed through the years. We've went from old single screen movie theaters to drive-in theaters, to multiple screen multiplexes, and now many people have high quality electronics in their man cave that would give any theater a run for their money. For those of us that remember the older movie theaters, they were a magical place. The smells of popcorn and candy mingling with the sounds of the bustling crowds and the flashing bright lights of the marquee. Going to the theater was an event. But when the lights went down and the crowds dispersed, the theater could be a spooky place. This is the atmosphere that Janz captures perfectly.

 

 

Larry Wilson, an awkward loner and horror movie aficionado, doesn't miss many of the Starlight Theaters Friday Midnight Matinees. He gets his popcorn and candy along with a large soda to wash it all down with. Tonight, he even got a future date with the cute girl behind the counter that he's never had the courage to ask out. This night was shaping up to be one that Larry would never forget. Unfortunately, this was the last good thing to happen tonight. For this night, blood was going to spill and not just on the screen.

Witching Hour Theatre is a fun romp through familiar territory. Janz doesn't try to do too much with this story. He lets it be exactly what it is - a B-movie tale told in an eerie familiar setting. He's got all the right ingredients going - atmosphere, good characters, flawless dialogue and pacing, and oh yes, plenty of the red stuff. Come right in and take your seat. Don't mind the stickiness on the floor. I'm sure it's only spilled soda...or is it?

 

 

 

4 1/2 Slasher Flicks out of 5

 

 


You can also follow my reviews at the following links:

 

https://kenmckinley.wordpress.com

 

http://intothemacabre.booklikes.com

 

https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/5919799-ken-mckinley

 

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review 2017-12-27 01:20
16 Tasks of the Festive Season: Square 9 - Winter Solstice / Yaldā Night
A Christmas Homecoming (Christmas Novellas) - Anne Perry

 

 

Winter Solstice and Yaldā Night / Bonus task: Read a book in one night.

 

This is the third of Ann Perry's Christmas novellas that I've read this holiday season (Perry's ninth Christmas novella overall), and I liked this one as much as the very first one I read, A Christmas Visitor.

 

The main series supporting character who takes center stage in A Christmas Homecoming is Charlotte Pitt's mother Caroline who -- 16 years after the murder of her daughter, Charlotte's sister Sarah, which had initially brought together Charlotte and her now-husband Thomas Pitt -- visits a Whitby (Yorkshire) country estate together with her second and much younger husband, Jewish actor-manager Joshua Fielding, and his company, in order to stage a play that the  daughter of their host has written based on (you guessed it) Bram Stoker's Dracula. When a stranger, who had been invited into the house on the plea of seeking shelter from a snowstorm that had cut off the area from the rest of civilization, is found killed, Caroline realizes that her actor friends will be the first to be suspected of having committed the murder, as the police will be disinclined to investigate their host -- an influential landowner and businessman -- and his household; so she decides to do some investigating on her own.

 

I confess to a certain amoiunt of apprehension after having read about the book's setting, but Perry thankfully doesn't fall into the trap of overemphasizing either the Yorkshire moors or the vampirism elements -- they're present, of course (and let's be honest, where would be the fun in setting this sort of story in the middle of London?), but it's the snowstorm-enhanced isolation of the estate rather than the moors that predominates in creating the atmosphere, and while you can't possibly write about Dracula without including vampire lore (and the contents of Stoker's book in particular) in some fashion or other, Perry is ultimately much more interested in the conceptual allegory of Dracula as the embodiment of evil.  And I guess I'm just a sucker for anything set in the world of the theatre; at any rate, despite some rather obvious preaching on things that any actor worth his salt ought to know since their first year of training (and which certainly a star actor like the one who is the addressee of said lesson here should not have to be told), and although Perry also seems to have taken more than a few cues from both Christopher Lee and Kenneth Branagh as to how a successful translation of Stoker's book to a dramatic medium might work, I rather enjoyed this particular aspect of the story.

 

Perry doesn't quite play fair with the reader as far as the solution to the murder is concerned: while it is possible to guess the guilty party (and even suspect bits of their motive), for the better part of Caroline's investigation there is not even a hint  as to the relevant facts, so guess is really what you have to do.  However, the death -- and Caroline's subsequent investigation -- only occurs in the last third of the story; it is by far not its only focus.  Perry takes great care in developing the various characters and their relationships and interactions first, so the murder (when it occurs) is really more the story's final catalyst than anything else.  If the characters' conflicts had been resolved as a result of some other event, that would conceivably have been quite as convincing -- but I suppose it just wouldn't have been an Anne Perry book then.

 

Whitby Abbey and churchyard -- inspiration and setting, respectively, for part of Bram Stoker's Dracula (photos mine)

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review 2017-11-24 21:55
A great resource for writers of historical fiction, historians, and people who love social history and the Victorian period.
Life on the Victorian Stage: Theatrical Gossip - Nell Darby

Thanks to Alex from Pen & Sword for providing me with a review paperback copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

If you have been following my reviews for some time, you will be aware that I have read a number of the historical books published by Pen & Sword. I tend to be more interested in social history and how historical changes affected the lives of those who don’t always figure in the big History treatises. Being a lover of plays and a kin theatregoer, I was very curious about this book. Yes, theatre gossip was intriguing, but getting a sense of what life on the Victorian stage must have been like was my main interest. Although sometimes we discover that life has changed dramatically in a reasonably short period of times, some things do not seem to change much. And human curiosity and the love of gossip are among those things. If Victorians had no access to social media, there were plenty of newspapers and periodicals to keep them entertained, and actors were as much a subject of interest then as they are now.

The author does not follow a narrative or chooses a few big cases in this book, but rather illustrates the sheer amount of theatrical news that occupied the Victorian press of the time, not only in London but also in the provinces. As communications improved, newspapers even started featuring stories about actors in America (either natives or British authors touring there) and although sometimes the features lacked in detail (in some cases a suicide or a death would not feature the name of those involved) they were always after items that would attract the public’s attention. Darby divides the book into three parts: Part 1 deals with the business side of things (including such matters as licenses, libel, bankruptcy, breach of contract…), Part 2 looks at criminal lives (from blackmail and assault to prostitution and murder), and Part 3 delves into the personal lives of the actors (what we would probably consider gossip proper, although not all of it is gossip. The chapter on death and disaster deals with serious matter and also makes us look at security measures and disasters in theatres, bigamy seems to have been much more common than it is today, and personally I was fascinated by the chapter on breaches of promise, as I had not realise that there were laws that offered more protection to women in those circumstances than I would have expected).  Each chapter shares both, examples of standard cases of what would usually find its way into the newspapers (brief pieces with hardly any detail) and it dedicates more space to others that were better known, but no single case gets all the limelight. In many ways, this book is like a sampler, where people interested in the subject can learn more and be pointed in the right direction to research further.

The author’s style of writing is direct, and mostly allows the sources to do the talking. She provides sufficient background (on legal matters, the nature of performances, technical issues…) for readers to appreciate the items she discusses, and also some reflections on her own take on the materials. She notes how some periodicals, like The Era, were in a double-bind of sorts, as they tried hard to defend the profession of acting on the stage (that had a pretty bad reputation, especially in the case of women), insisting that actors were honourable and true professionals, whilst at the same time featured “sensational” news to attract readers. Although these days respectability is not a concept many people are worried about, it is true that the press has a hard time trying to reconcile the ideal of protectors of the truth, whilst fighting to keep the attention of the public by any means necessary. Is it possible to keep the moral high ground whilst publishing gossip and innuendo?

Although this is not, perhaps, a book for the general reading public, as I read I kept thinking about how useful this book would be to writers of historical fiction interested in the period (and not only for those considering using a theatrical background in their story but also for those thinking about the press of the time and even society at large) and to historians. Darby provides end notes full of details, both of the sources of her research and also of further information available. Although she mostly uses newspapers, she digs on the archives to confirm details such as names (as many actors and actresses used stage names and some of those were fairly popular) and discovers that Mark Twain wasn’t the only one whose death had been grossly exaggerated (deaths, marriages… were often misreported). The paperback also contains pictures that allow us to put faces to some of the names and help transport us to the era.

In sum, this is a book that will greatly assist writers, historians, and people passionate about the Victorian era and the history of the stage in the UK. It is a good starting point for those who want a general view of the topic and/or are looking for inspiration for their next story or research project. And if you just want to confirm that people’s love for gossip about the stars has not changed over the years, this is your book.

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