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text 2018-03-24 05:38
Reading progress update: I've read 55%.
The Night She Died - Dorothy Simpson
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text 2018-03-20 01:55
Reading progress update: I've read 13%.
The Night She Died - Dorothy Simpson

My library finally started offering Hoopla. This series popped up while I was browsing, so I thought I'd check it out.

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text 2018-03-13 23:55
KYD Green Round: Suspect Card Guess - Team MbD / Lillelara / TA
Unnatural Death: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery - Dorothy L. Sayers,Ian Carmichael


Finished Dorothy L. Sayers's Unnatural Death over the weekend and decided to use it for a Stephen King suspect guess (a book by an author whose [last] name begins with "S").

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review 2018-01-17 15:54
Today this would be different
The Uninvited - Dorothy Macardle,Luke Gibbons

but not much. I'd say there would be more or less supernatural elements to the story and the end was a little flat, I didn't really feal a real relationship build, but overall this stands up well against the test of time. Siblings Roderick and Pamela Fitzgerald leave London for the Devon Coastline and fall in love with Cliff End, a house with a disturbed history, the unravelling of that history brings them face to face with ghosts, and the aftermath of things that people did that left echoes. 


Originally published in 1942 this is more psychological than paranormal and the troubles are believable.  It's an interesting look at how some people create their own ghosts and troubles by trying to make things fit into their own moulds.


Worth a read.

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text 2018-01-08 18:58
2017 in Review
How To Be A Tudor: A Dawn-to-Dusk Guide to Everyday Life - Ruth Goodman
New York 2140 - Kim Stanley Robinson
The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's New World - Andrea Wulf
Murder Must Advertise - Dorothy L. Sayers
The Summer Before the War: A Novel - Helen Simonson
Racing the Devil - Charles Todd
Calamity in Kent - John Rowland
Ashes of London - Andrew Taylor
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd - Agatha Christie
Agnes and the Hitman - Bob Mayer,Jennifer Crusie

2017 was an excellent reading year around here.  I had four five-star reads, not counting re-reads, which is a very high total for me, out of some 90+ books read.  One was a novel - 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson, and three non-fiction: The Invention of Nature, by Andrea Wulf, and two by Ruth Goodman, How to be a Tudor, and How to be a Victorian.  Wonderful re-reads included Dorothy L. Sayers' Murder Must Advertise, several Mary Russell novels by Laurie R. King, and The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (which I think I read in about 1978, but remembered nothing).


The best historical novel I read in 2017 was The Summer Before the War, by Helen Simonson, and the best new mystery Racing the Devil, by Charles Todd.  I read a decent amount of non-fiction, all of it good, from The Glass Universe (about the ladies of the Harvard Observatory) to Michelangelo's Ceiling (Damn it, your holiness, I'm a sculptor, not a painter), The Sun and the Moon (the Man-bats, or America's first great "fake news" story), and A is for Arsenic (Agatha Christie knew her poisons).


I had some reads that were just pure fun, like Jennifer Crusie's Agnes and the Hitman, Deborah Harkness' trilogy on witches, or Anne Bishop's novels about The Others.


It did have down moments.  Calamity in Kent's plot boiled down to "Scotland Yard inspector decides his tabloid journalist friend, Jimmy, is the best choice to solve a locked room mystery, and tells Jimmy to go for it."  Um.  OK?


The one which angered me, however, was my sole 1-star read of the year, The Ashes of London, which was billed as a thriller set during the Great Fire of London.  It is set *after* the fire, did not have very good historical detailing (it could have been pretty much anywhere and anywhen in the past that had suffered a large fire), and had two narrators, neither interesting.  And then it offended me with a touch of "let's start the characterization of the woman by having her evil cousin rape her" and I was out.


But most of my reading year was wonderful.  I hope yours was, too.

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