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text 2019-08-12 23:57
Halloween Bingo 2019 PreParty -- Question for 08/12 (Day 12): Classic Crime and Classic Horror Recommendations?
Gaudy Night - Dorothy L. Sayers
Brat Farrar - Josephine Tey
The Haunted Monastery (Judge Dee Series) - Robert H. van Gulik
Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury
Goblin Market - Christina Rossetti
Who Killed Robert Prentice? - Dennis Wheatley
The Dykemaster - Theodor Storm
The Signalman: A Ghost Story - Charles Dickens,Simon Bradley
Hauff's Fairy Tales - Wilhelm Hauff
The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood

Late to today's party and most of my really big favorites have already made an appearance in other folks' posts, so I figured I'll just list mine and showcase at the top of my post some of the books that haven't yet been highlighted by others.  By bingo category, with suspense and mysteries together in one block and an extra block for the children's books instead:

 

MYSTERIES / SUSPENSE

Dorothy L. Sayers: Lord Peter Wimsey series, especially the Wimsey & Vane subseries / quartet

Arthur Conan Doyle: Sherlock Holmes series
Agatha Christie: Poirot, Miss Marple and Tommy & Tuppence series, The Witness for the Prosecution, The Mousetrap, And Then There Were None, Crooked House, Towards Zero, The Sittaford Mystery
Patricia Wentworth: Miss Silver series
Ngaio Marsh: Roderick Alleyn series
Josephine Tey: Brat Farrar, The Daughter of Time, The Franchise Affair
John Dickson Carr: The Hollow Man
Anthony Wynne: Murder of a Lady
Mavis Doriel Hay: The Santa Klaus Murder
Georgette Heyer: Envious Casca
Robert van Gulik: Judge Dee series
Georges Simenon: Maigret series
Graham Greene: The Third Man
John Mortimer: Rumpole series
Ruth Rendell: Inspector Wexford series
P.D. James: Inspector Dalgliesh series
Dennis Wheatley: Who Killed Robert Prentice?
Q. Patrick: File on Fenton and Farr
Mary Roberts Rinehart: Locked Doors
Rex Stout: Nero Wolfe series
Patricia Highsmith: The Talented Mr. Ripley
Raymond Chandler: The Big Sleep
Dashiell Hammett: The Maltese Falcon
Cornell Woolrich: Rear Window, The Bride Wore Black
James M. Cain: Double Indemnity, The Postman Always Rings Twice
John Dudley Ball: In the Heat of the Night
Mario Puzo: The Godfather
Neil Simon, H.R.F. Keating: Murder by Death

 

 

SUPERNATURAL (FANTASY, SCIENCE FICTION), DYSTOPIA
William Shakespeare: The Tempest
J.R.R. Tolkien: The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings
C.S. Lewis: The Chronicles of Narnia
Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451
Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid's Tale
George Orwell: 1984
Aldous Huxley: Brave New World
Philip K. Dick: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
Sheri S. Tepper: The True Game
Alfred Lord Tennyson: The Lady of Shalott

 

 

GOTHIC & HORROR
William Shakespeare: Macbeth
Jane Austen: Northanger Abbey
Charlotte Brontë: Jane Eyre
Anne Brontë: The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
Daphne Du Maurier: Rebecca
Christina Rossetti: Goblin Market
Charles Dickens: Bleak House, A Christmas Carol, The Signalman
Oscar Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Canterville Ghost
Wilkie Collins: The Moonstone
Theodor Storm: Der Schimmelreiter (The Dykemaster)
Edith Wharton: Ghost Stories
Edgar Allan Poe: The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Raven, The Mask of the Red Death
Bram Stoker: Dracula
Mary Shelley: Frankenstein
Robert Louis Stevenson: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Henry James: The Turn of the Screw
Shirley Jackson: The Lottery, We Have Always Lived in the Castle

 

 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS
Otfried Preußler: The Little Witch, The Little Ghost
Robert Arthur, et al.: The Three Investigators series
T.H. White: The Sword in the Stone
Wilhelm Hauff: Fairy Tales

 

 

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text 2019-08-11 22:40
Halloween Bingo 2019 PreParty -- Question for 08/09 (Day 9): Book Suggestions for the New Squares? Part 2
Gaudy Night - Dorothy L. Sayers
The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood
Seven Gothic Tales (Penguin Modern Classics) - Isak Dinesen
In the Woods - Tana French
Crooked House - Agatha Christie
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil - John Berendt
The Bride Wore Black - William Irish,Cornell Woolrich
Their Lost Daughters - Joy Ellis,Richard Armitage
A Great Deliverance - Elizabeth George
Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption: A Story from Different Seasons - Stephen King

DARK ACADEMIA

Somehow, British universities and public schools seem to provide a particularly fertile ground for this sort of story:

 

* Dorothy L. Sayers: Gaudy Night (Oxford University)
* Agatha Christie: Cat Among the Pigeons (private girls' school)
* Nicholas Blake: A Question of Proof (public school)
* Edmund Crispin: The Moving Toyshop (Oxford University)
* James Hilton: Murder at School (public school)
* Michael Innes: Death at the President's Lodging (fictional college)
* P.D. James: Death in Holy Orders (priests' seminary)
* P.D. James: Shroud for a Nightingale (nursing school)
* Elizabeth George: Well-Schooled in Murder (public school)
* Elizabeth George: For the Sake of Elena (Cambridge University)
* Colin Dexter: Inspector Morse series (Oxford University)
* Susanna Gregory: Matthew Bartholomew series (Cambridge University, 14h century)
* Ian Morson: William Falconer series (Oxford University, 13th century)
* Shirley Mckay: Hue and Cry (St. Andrews University, 16th century)

 

 

DYSTOPIAN HELLSCAPE

My quartet of must-read dystopian novels has so far consisted of:

 

* George Orwell: 1984
* Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451
* Aldous Huxley: Brave New World
* Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid's Tale

 

Obviously, with the impending release of Atwood's The Testaments, there might now be a fifth book to add to that group -- for the moment it's on my TBR.

 

 

INTERNATIONAL WOMAN OF MYSTERY

Based on the definition of this square, all U.S. authors are "international for UK readers and vice versa, and both of them are "international" for me.  We all have plenty of favorite women writers from both of these countries -- so here are a few from elsewhere (based on MR's definition of this square as an outrcrop of "Terrifying Women"; i.e., writers whose books fit any of the Halloween Bingo categories):

 

* Zen Cho (Malaysia, UK)

* Donna Leon (Italy, U.S.)

* Dolores Redondo (Spain)

* Silvia Moreno-Garcia (Mexico, Canada)

* Isabel Allende (Chile; now also U.S.)

* Edwidge Danticat (Haiti)

* George Sand (France): novel La mare au diable (The Devil's Pool)

* Emmuska Orczy (Hungary, France, UK)

* Nina Blazon (Germany, Slovenia)

* Juli Zeh (Germany): novel Schilf (Dark Matter)

* Helene Tungsten (Sweden)

* Karin Fossum (Norway)
* Isak Dinesen (aka Karen / Tania Blixen) (Denmark, Kenya)

* Sofi Oksanen (Estonia): novel The Purge (Fegefeuer)

* Tana French (Ireland; going by nationality also U.S.)

 

 

PSYCH

Hoo boy.  Sooo many great books -- there is a seriously immense amount of f*cked up people walking around in in literatureland.  (Including authors messing with their readers' minds.)

 

* Agatha Christie: By the Pricking of My Thumbs, Endless Night, And Then There Were None, Crooked House, Murder Is Easy, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd
* John Dickson Carr: The Hollow Man
* Edgar Allan Poe: Pretty much anything he ever wrote -- to begin with The System of Dr. Tarr and Professor Feather, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Oval Portrait, and Annabelle Lee
* Charles Dickens: The Signalman
* Robert Louis Stevenson: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
* Washington Irving: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
* Henry James: The Turn of the Screw
* E.T.A. Hoffmann: Der Sandmann (The Sandman)
* Shirley Jackson: The Lottery and We Have Always Lived in the Castle
* Cornell Woolrich: The Bride Wore Black
* Raymond Chandler: The Big Sleep
* Dashiell Hammett: The Maltese Falcon
* Michael Connelly: The Concrete Blonde, The Poet, Blood Work, A Darkness More Than Night, The Narrows
* George Pelecanos: Shame the Devil
* Dennis Lehane: Mystic River
* Ann Leckie: The Raven Tower
* Elizabeth George: A Suitable Vengeance and A Great Deliverance
* Joy Ellis: Jackman and Evans series
* Peter May: The Blackhouse and Coffin Road
* Ian Rankin: Knots and Crosses, Tooth and Nail, Black and Blue, Dead Souls
* Val McDermid: Carol Jordan and Tony Hill series, A Place of Execution
* Robert Galbraith (J.K. Rowling): The Silkworm, Career of Evil
* P.D. James: Devices and Desires
* Barbara Vine: A Dark-Adapted Eye
* Minette Walters: The Ice House
* Margery Allingham: Death of a Ghost and The Case of the Late Pig
* Kazuo Ishiguro: Never Let Me Go
* Anthony Horowitz: The House of Silk
* Iain Pears: An Instance of the Fingerpost, Stone's Fall, The Portrait
* C.J. Sansom: Revelation
* Ellis Peters: A Morbid Taste for Bones, The Hermit of Eyton Forest, The Devil's Novice

* Umberto Eco: The Name of the Rose

* Tana French: In the Woods
* Karin Fossum: He Who Fears the Wolf
* Joe Nesbø: The Snowman

 

 

TRULY TERRIFYING
* John Berendt: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
* Truman Capote: In Cold Blood
* Norman Mailer: The Executioner's Song
* Joseph D. Pistone: Donnie Brasco
* David Simon: Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets
* Miles Corwin: The Killing Season : A Summer Inside an LAPD Homicide Division
* Barry Scheck, Jim Dwyer, Peter Neufeld: Actual Innocence
* Sr. Helen Prejean: Dead Man Walking
* Steve Bogira: Courtroom 302: A Year Behind the Scenes in an American Criminal Courthouse
* Jonathan Harr: A Civil Action

* Joseph Wambaugh: The Onion Field

* Edward Humes: Mississippi Mud
* Joe McGinniss: Blind Faith
* Lowell Cauffiel: Eye of the Beholder
* Nicholas Pileggi: Casino
* Michael Connelly: Crime Beat: Stories of Cops and Killers, and Murder in Vegas
* Harold Schecter: True Crime: An American Anthology
* Christiane F.: Wir Kinder Vom Bahnhof Zoo (Autobiography of a Girl of the Streets)
* Eric Jager: Blood Royal: A True Tale of Crime and Detection in Medieval Paris
* Kate Summerscale: The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher
* P.D. James: The Maul and the Pear Tree: The Ratcliffe Highway Murders, 1811
* Victoria Blake: Mrs. Maybrick
* Angus McLaren: A Prescription for Murder: The Victorian Serial Killings of Dr. Thomas Neill Cream
* Judith Flanders: The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime
* William Roughead: Classic Crimes
* Members of the Detection Club: Anatomy of Murder, and More Anatomy of Murder
* Kathryn Harkup: A Is For Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie

* David Suchet: Poirot and Me

* William S. Baring-Gould: Sherlock Holmes of Baker Street: A Life of the World's First Consulting Detective

* Vincent Starrett: The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes

* Martin Fido: The World of Sherlock Holmes

* Michael Cox: The Baker Street File: A Guide to the Appearance and Habits of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson

* David Stuart Davies: Bending the Willow: Jeremy Brett As Sherlock Holmes

* David L. Hammer: The Travelers' Companion to the London of Sherlock Holmes

* Scene of the Crime: A Guide to the Landscapes of British Detective Fiction
* Richard Lindberg: Return to the Scene of the Crime: A Guide to Infamous Places in Chicago
* Alain Silver, Elizabeth Ward: Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles
* Eddie Muller: Dark City: The Lost World of Film Noir
* Jim Garrison: On the Trail of the Assassins
* Hannah Arendt: Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil
* Louise Arbour: War Crimes and the Culture of Peace
* Richard J. Goldstone: For Humanity: Reflections of a War Crimes Investigator
* Clea Koff: The Bone Woman: A Forensic Anthropologist's Search for Truth in the Mass Graves of Rwanda, Bosnia, Croatia, and Kosovo
* Michael P. Scharf, Paul R. Williams: Peace with Justice?: War Crimes and Accountability in the Former Yugoslavia
* Gary Jonathan Bass: Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals
* Judith Armatta: Twilight of Impunity: The War Crimes Trial of Slobodan Milošević

 

 

KING OF FEAR

Stephen King's own works:

* Carrie
* Misery
* Pet Semetary

* The Shining
* The Long Walk

* Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption

* On Writing

 

From King's recommendations in On Writing, as listed HERE, HERE and HERE:

* Michael Connelly: The Poet and The Narrows
* Joseph Conrad: Heart of Darkness
* Gabriel García Márquez: One Hundred Years of Solitude
* Elizabeth George: Deception on His Mind
* Peter Høeg: Smilla’s Sense of Snow
* Stieg Larsson: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
* Harper Lee: To Kill a Mockingbird
* Dennis Lehane: The Given Day
* George Pelecanos: Hard Revolution
* J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s (Philosopher's) Stone, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

 

 

FILM AT 11

I guess most people here know my likes when it comes to movie and TV adaptations, but anyway ...

 

Stand-alone books adapted as stand-alone movies:

* Agatha Christie: And Then There Were None, Crooked House, Witness for the Prosecution, Why Didn't They Ask Evans?
* Jane Austen: Northanger Abbey
* Charlotte Brontë: Jane Eyre
* Anne Brontë: The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
* Emily Brontë: Wuthering Heights
* Daphne Du Maurier: Rebecca
* Charles Dickens: Bleak House and A Christmas Carol
* Bram Stoker: Dracula
* Mary Shelley: Frankenstein
* Anne Rice: Interview with the Vampire
* John Fowles: The French Lieutenant's Woman
* Isabel Allende: The House of the Spirits
* John Berendt: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
* Sr. Helen Prejean: Dead Man Walking
* Stephen King: (Rita Hayworth and) the Shawshank Redemption, Carrie, Misery, The Shining

* S.S. Van Dine: The Kennel Murder Case

* Graham Greene: The Third Man

* Cornell Woolrich: Rear Window
* John Dudley Ball: In the Heat of the Night
* John Gregory Dunne: True Confessions
* Dashiell Hammett: The Maltese Falcon
* James M. Cain: Double Indemnity, The Postman Always Rings Twice
* Elmore Leonard: Get Shorty
* John Grisham: The Firm, The Client, A Time to Kill, The Pelican Brief
* Frederick Forsyth: The Day of the Jackal
* Barbara Vine: A Dark-Adapted Eye, Gallowglass, A Fatal Inversion
* Minette Walters: The Ice House

* Ethel Lina White: The Lady Vanishes

* Barry Unsworth: Morality Play

* Umberto Eco: The Name of the Rose

* Peter Høeg: Smilla's Sense of Snow

* George Orwell: 1984

* Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451

 

Book series installments made into stand-alone movies or vice versa:

* Agatha Christie: Poirot: Murder on the Orient Express (Albert Finney); as well as Death on the Nile and Appointment with Death (Peter Ustinov)

* Agatha Christie: Bundle Brent / Superintendent Battle: The Seven Dials Mystery (Cheryl Campbell, James Warwick)

* Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid's Tale

* Walter Mosley: Devil in a Blue Dress

* James Ellroy: L.A. Confidential

* Raymond Chandler: Marlowe: The Big Sleep, Farewell My Lovely, The Lady in the Lake, The Long Goodbye (with different actors starring as Marlowe)
* Dashiell Hammett: The Thin Man (original movie and 5 sequels)

* Mario Puzo: The Godfather (3 movies)

* Tony Hillerman: The Dark Wind (Fred Ward, Lou Diamond Phillips)

 

Book series adapted as TV series or sequential movies:

* J.R.R. Tolkien: The Lord of the Rings

* C.S. Lewis: The Chronicles of Narnia

* J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter

* Arthur Conan Doyle: Sherlock Holmes (Jeremy Brett, David Burke / Edward Hardwicke)
* Dorothy L. Sayers: Lord Peter Wimsey (two series: Wimsey / Vane: Harriet Walter & Edward Petherbridge; Wimsey solo: Ian Carmichael)
* Agatha Christie: Poirot (David Suchet, Hugh Fraser), Miss Marple (Joan Hickson), Tommy & Tuppence (Francesca Annis & James Warwick)
* E.G. Hornung: Raffles
* Ngaio Marsh: Inspector Alleyn (Patrick Malahide)
* Margery Allingham: Campion (Peter Davidson)
* P.D. James: Inspector Dalgliesh (Roy Marsden; 2 episodes: Martin Shaw)

* Ruth Rendell: Inspector Wexford (George Baker, Christopher Ravenscroft)
* Ellis Peters: Brother Cadfael (Derek Jacobi)
* Colin Dexter: Morse (John Thaw, Kevin Whately; including TV spin-offs: Endeavour (Shaun Evans) and Lewis (Kevin Whately, Laurence Fox))
* Elizabeth George: Inspector Lynley (Nathaniel Parker, Sharon Small)
* Ian Rankin: Rebus (2 series; John Hannah and later Ken Stott)
* John Morimer: Rumpole of the Bailey (Leo McKern)
* Caroline Graham: Midsomer Murders (John Nettles, later Neil Dudgeon)

* Henning Mankell: Wallander (2 adaptations: 1 series starring Kenneth Branagh; 1 series co-produced in Sweden and Germany)

* Stieg Larsson: The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo and sequels

* Michael Connelly: Bosch (Titus Weilliver)

* Tony Hillerman: Skinwalkers, Coyote Waits, and A Thief of Time (Wes Studi, Adam Beach)

* Craig Johnson: Longmire (Robert Taylor, Lou Diamond Phillips)

* Rex Stout: Nero Wolfe (Maury Chaykin, Timothy Hutton)

 

Honorary mention: Murder by Death; novelized by H.R.F. Keating and Neil Simon.  Its not a book-to-movie adaptation (rather the reverse), so going by the definition for the square it probably doesn't count, but this list just wouldn't be complete without it.

 

 

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text 2019-08-07 18:36
Pre-Party for Halloween Bingo - Favorite Halloween Bingo Authors
Deep Water - Patricia Highsmith,Gillian Flynn
Murder in Mesopotamia - Agatha Christie
The Elementals - Michael Rowe,Michael McDowell
Clouds of Witness - Dorothy L. Sayers

 

Patricia Highsmith - the perfect fit for the Terryfying Women square.

Agatha Christie - whenever there is a square I can fit a Christie in, I´m doing it.

Michael McDowell - It wouldn´t be a Halloween bingo without a McDowell.

Dorothy L. Sayers - I read quite a few Sayers for Halloween bingo in the past and I´m keeping my fingers crossed for the Dark Academia square being on my card this year. Gaudy Night is waiting to get read.

 

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text 2019-08-01 22:01
Halloween Bingo 2019 PreParty -- Question for 08/01 (Day 1): Mystery or Horror?
Wer knackt die Nuss?: Band 1 - Wolfgang Ecke
The Secret of Terror Castle (The Three Investigators #1) - Robert Arthur
After the Funeral - Agatha Christie
The Complete Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle
Gaudy Night - Dorothy L. Sayers
Brother Cadfael: A Morbid Taste for Bones/One Corpse Too Many/Monk's Hood - Ellis Peters
Death in Holy Orders - P.D. James
The Big Sleep - Raymond Chandler
Angels Flight - Michael Connelly
Rebus: Capital Crimes - Ian Rankin

Mystery, definitely. 

 

For one thing, I'm a total chicken -- I can't look at blood (not even, or rather, especially not my own, e.g. in medical procedures); and anything shocking, spooky, or otherwise unnaturally unsettling just has me running for the rafters.  That's particularly true at night -- which is when I'm doing a good deal of my reading -- but basically, it applies 24/7.  So that not only rules out slashers and other forms of gory horror, but pretty much any and all forms of psychological horror as well.  The only stories typically classified as "horror" that I can go near are classics where I essentially know what's going to happen from the word "go" (e.g., Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde), or ghost stories (mostly classics as well) where the appearance of the ghost(s) is (1) in itself not overly unsettling, at least not in the way in which it is presented to the reader, and / or (2) tied to a larger point that the author is trying to make.  (E.g.  most of Edith Wharton's ghost stories, Charles Dickens's The Signalman and -- of course -- A Christmas Carol and The Chimes, and Oscar Wilde's hilarious send-up of the genre, The Canterville Ghost.)  Edgar Allan Poe is a special case ... I do love some of his writing (e.g., The Masque of the Red Death and The Raven), but The Tell-Tale Heart creeped the hell out of me way back in high school, and that cat story (which shall remain unnamed in this post) ... well, let's just say once was once too often.

 

And then -- well, I became a mystery reader all the way back in elementary school, and that was probably the most formative reading experience of my entire life.  It started with a series of books specifically targeting elementary school kids, whose (idiomatic) title went straight to my little smarta$$ jugular, challenging me to demonstrate I had what it took to solve them.  From there, it was practically guaranteed I'd move on to and love the Three Investigators series -- by which time my mom had caught on once and for all, too, and in short order presented me with my first Agatha Christie -- After the Funeral, which for that reason alone will always be one of my personal favorites.  And the rest, as they say, is history!

 

I've long stopped looking "just" for clever puzzles in mysteries, although that is still at least one of the things I want to see -- it takes a lot of other things in a book to work well for me if I've solved the mystery early on and still end up liking the book.  But on the other hand, I'll be just as unhappy if I can't connect, on some level or other, with the main character (or if not them, at least an important supporting character) -- or if I'm presented with shallowly drawn, cardboard or just flat out boring characters, or if the plot just ties one trope onto the next or is otherwise devoid of originality.  In other words, a mystery that works for me will always be more than merely the hunt for a killer (or other criminal, as the case may be) -- it will be a complex blend of well-drawn, individual characters and an intelligent plot, and ideally the characters will also have some other (e.g., personal) challenges to deal with on their journey to the mystery's solution.

 

Since I also love historical fiction (and nonfiction), historical mysteries are a particular favorite -- provided they're well-researched, such as Ellis Peters's Brother Cadfael series (a long-time favorite) and C.J. Sansom's Shardlake series (my most recent "must-read" series) --, but I've never lost my love for the Golden Age classics -- next to Christie, in particular Sherlock Holmes and everything Dorothy L. Sayers, as probably everybody here knows -- and am thrilled to also see Golden Age crime fiction above and beyond the eternal great ones making such a huge comeback in recent years.  Martin Edwards, the current president (and chief archivist) of both the Detection Club and the Crime Writers' Association, may not be everybody's cup of tea personally, but there's no denying that his lobbying for the revival of Golden and Silver Age crime fiction has a lot to do with this, and I think he deserves huge plaudits on those grounds alone.  That said, P.D. James's writing (and her Inspector Dalgliesh) also has had a special place in my heart for longer than I can remember ... and I'm inordinately happy to have discovered many more great women crime writers and women detectives in recent years; most recently, Joy Ellis's Jackman and Evans series (*waves to Jennifer*).

 

Oh, and for the record, the "I can't look at blood" thing applies to mysteries as well, of course -- which is one of the reasons why as a rule I don't read serial killer books; nor any other mysteries where I know, going in, that the corpse or the crime scene will be described in gratuitously graphic terms.   [She said, side-eying J.K. Rowling for the second Cormoran Strike book, which definitely should come with a warning label attached.]  However, I am not at all opposed to grit and grime in a mystery's setting -- in fact, I particularly enjoy both classic noir crime fiction (with Raymond Chandler a particular favorite) and modern crime fiction that takes a look at the state of society, such as Michael Connelly's and Ian Rankin's books.

 

 

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review 2019-06-30 17:00
Feminismus in vollendeter Boshaftigkeit
New Yorker Geschichten - Dorothy Parker

Schonungslos und messerscharf geht Dorothy Parker die Frauen an. Sie erzählt in zahlreichen Kurzgeschichten wie es der holden Weiblichkeit in der Großstadt der 1920er und 30er ergeht.

Es ist immer schwierig, eine Rezension zu einer Kurzgeschichtensammlung zu schreiben. In diesem Fall ist es unmöglich jeder Geschichte an sich gerecht zu werden. Insgesamt werden in "New Yorker Geschichten" dreißig Kurzgeschichten von Dorothy Parker zusammengefasst. Verbindende Thematik dieser Geschichten ist die holde Weiblichkeit, die in vielen Facetten zu tragen kommt.

In erster Linie hat es Dorothy Parker auf die verwöhnten Damen abgesehen. Mit äußerst spitzer Zunge rechnet sie mit den Frauen der New Yorker Gesellschaft ab, die sich mit dem Chamagnerglas in der rechten Hand von einem Herren zum nächsten schwingen, um dem Zwang einer Berufstätigkeit zu entgehen.

Oberflächlich betrachtet könnte man die Autorin fast boshaft nennen, so wie sie das Leben dieser Frauen beschreibt. Allerdings prangert sie die Abhängigkeit der Frauen vom männlichen Geschlecht an. Sie zeigt, wie eingesperrt - egal ob in der Ehe oder in der vom Geliebten finanzierten Wohnung - viele Damen sind.

"Wenn das nicht die Musterfrau gibt! Immer tun, was irgendwer anders will, ob's dir passt oder nicht. Und nie fähig, mal eine eigene Idee auch nur zu murmeln." (S. 155)

Es sind dreißig Geschichten über Geliebte, Ehefrauen und solche, die es werden wollen, schöne Mädchen und gediegene Damen - die von einer Abendveranstaltung zur nächsten hetzen.

Mir haben Dorothy Parkers "New Yorker Geschichten" gut gefallen. Manche Geschichten haben mich mehr inspiriert als andre, was bei diesem Umfang bestimmt der Regel entspricht.

Berührt hat mich, dass die Autorin zeigt, wie sehr Frauen für ihre Unabhängigkeit kämpfen müssen, wie rasch aus einer sanften Liebe Abhängigkeit wird, und wie boshaft das weibliche Geschlecht oft gegenseitig zueinander ist.

Parkers Schreibstil empfinde ich als wohlgeformt, auf elegante Art provokant und manchmal ein bisschen anzüglich. Sie überzeugt durch einen klaren Blick, ihre schneidende Zunge und eine faszinierende Boshaftigkeit, die sie meist durch das Ende der einzelnen Geschichten entschärft. 

Meiner Meinung nach hat Dorothy Parker eine Sammlung vollendeter Boshaftigkeit geschaffen, die mit den Frauen abrechnet und den Männern die Rechnung präsentiert.

„New Yorker Geschichten“ ist für Leser, die sich für Frauen der gehobeneren Gesellschaft der 1920er- und 30er-Jahre interessieren und Feminismus auf boshaft-elegantem Niveau erlesen wollen.

Source: zeit-fuer-neue-genres.blogspot.com
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