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review 2020-05-29 07:42
The Attack on Troy by Rodney Castleden
Attack On Troy - Rodney Castleden

TITLE:  The Attack on Troy

 

AUTHOR:  Rodney Castleden

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2006

 

FORMAT:  ebook

 

ISBN-13:  9781781596890

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DESCRIPTION:

 

3300 years ago Agamemnon, king of Mycenae in Greece, attacked the city of Troy in western Anatolia. The bloody siege that followed gave rise to one of the most famous legends of the ancient world, and the search for the truth behind the legend has intrigued scholars ever since. In this fascinating new investigation Rodney Castleden reconsiders all the evidence in order to establish the facts and give a historical basis to the most potent myth of ancient warfare.

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REVIEW:

 

This book is a little bit different to Michael Wood's In Search of the Trojan War, which reads like an archaeological detective story.  Both books provide similar information but in a different "format".  Castleden attempts to recreate what the Trojan War by comparing what is known from archeology of Bronze Age Mycenaean and Ancient Near Eastern civilization (Hittites, Luwians, Egyptians etc) to the information provided in various incomplete and lost epics such as the The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Kypria, and The Little Iliad.  Castleden works through the ancient epics and explains what is plausible in terms of cultural and military factors and what is probably poetic license.  The writing style is clear and easy to read, with the layperson rather than academic in mind.  A nicely written introduction to the archaeology and mythology of the Trojan War.

 

PS:  Another nonfiction book on the Trojan Was is Barry Strauss's The Trojan War, but I never did manage to read more than 2 chapters as the author had a tendency to novelize whole sections of the Iliad that did not appeal to me.

 

 

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review 2020-05-27 09:36
In Search of the Trojan War by Michael Wood
In Search of the Trojan War - Michael Wood

TITLE:  In Search of the Trojan War

 

AUTHOR:  Michael Wood

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2005 (updated edition)

 

FORMAT:  paperback

 

ISBN-13:  9780563522652

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DESCRIPTION:

 "For thousands of years we have been enthralled by tales of Troy and its heroes. Achilles and Hector, Paris and the famed beauty Helen remain some of the most enduring figures in art and literature. But did these titanic characters really walk the earth? Was there ever an actual siege of Troy? In this extensively revised edition, historian Michael Wood takes account of the latest dramatic developments in the search for Troy. His wide-ranging study of the complex archaeological, literary and historical records has been brought up-to-date. Detailing the rediscovery in Moscow of the so-called jewels of Helen and the re-excavation of the site of Troy begun in 1988, which continues to yield new evidence about the historical city, In Search of the Trojan War takes a fresh look at some of the most excited discoveries in archaeology. A dazzling and exhaustive analysis. Washington Post This beautifully illustrated book vividly evokes themes that are central to our civilizations quest for its past. "

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REVIEW:

 

An entertaining and fascinating detective history book that aims to determine if the Trojan War could have happened as described in Homer's Iliad.  Wood takes a look at archaeology (ancient texts and ground work), as well as literature, to determine what was going on in and around the ancient Mediterranean region during the Bronze Age.  The updated edition includes an additional chapter that reveals new finds made since the 1980s.  A few more illustrations (especially one that displays all the Troy levels) would have been useful.

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url 2020-05-23 17:37
#AncientGreek Theogony Θεογονία #mythology “Birth of the #Gods” attributed to Hesiod 700 BC, and the Derveni Papyrus 500 BC
Ama Dios: 9 AoL Consciousness Books Combined - Nataša Pantović Nuit

ArtEducationSymbols and SignsSpiritualityPower of Minddefault

 

Derveni Papyrus about Orphism and Ancient Greek s

Esoteric teachings of Golden Citizens of Ancient Greece

Learning from , and ancient  by Natasa Pantovic

Metamorphoses. Transformation. A journey of a  passing through Gaia, but also an epic poem in fifteen books written 2,000 years ago, by the Roman poet Ovid, completed in 8 AC inspired by the Ancient Greek Theogony Θεογονία “Birth of the Gods” attributed to Hesiod 700 BC, and the Derveni 500 BC.

 

Derveni-papyrus oldest ancient greek BC

 

The Oldest Greek Papyrus 500 BC Derveni Papyrus

The poet's writings are based on already fully established Ancient Greek manuscript tradition. Re-writing myths, the creation story, Ovid begins by describing how the elements emerge out of chaos, and how mankind degenerates from the Gold Age to the Silver Age to the Age of Iron. This is followed by an attempt by the giants (Titans) to seize the heavens, at which the God Jove sends a great flood which destroys all living things except one couple, Deucalion and Pyrrha.

Source: www.artof4elements.com/entry/270/derveni-papyrus-and-orphism
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review 2020-03-30 08:17
Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings by Charles Hapgood
Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings: Evidence of Advanced Civilization in the Ice Age - Charles H. Hapgood

TITLE:   Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings: Evidence of Advanced Civilization in the Ice Age

 

AUTHOR:  Charles H. Hapgood

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2014 (originally 1965)

 

FORMAT:  Paperback

 

ISBN-13:  9780932813428

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DESCRIPTION:

 

Charles Hapgood s classic 1966 book on ancient maps is back in print after 20 years. Hapgood produces concrete evidence of an advanced worldwide civilization existing many thousands of years before ancient Egypt. He has found the evidence in many beautiful maps long known to scholars, the Piri Reis Map that shows Antarctica, the Hadji Ahmed map, the Oronteus Finaeus and other amazing maps. Hapgood concluded that these maps were made from more ancient maps from the various ancient archives around the world, now lost. Hapgood also concluded that the ancient mapmakers were in some ways much more advanced scientifically than Europe in the 16th century, or than the ancient civilizations of Greece, Egypt, and Babylonian. Not only were these unknown people more advanced in mapmaking than any people prior to the 18th century, it appears they mapped all the continents. The Americas were mapped thousands of years before Columbus. Antarctica was mapped when its coasts were free of ice. There is evidence that these people must have lived when the ice age had not yet ended in the Northern Hemisphere and when Alaska was still connected with Siberia by the Pleistocene, ice age land bridge.

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REVIEW:

 

A fascinating analysis of several old maps and what the results ultimately mean.

 

 

 

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text 2020-03-05 22:18
New Project: Ides of March...and all of April
Classics: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) - Mary Beard,John Henderson
Confronting the Classics: Traditions, Adventures and Innovations - Mary Beard
SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome - Mary Beard
Frogs and Other Plays - Aristophanes,David B. Barrett,Shomit Dutta
The Persians and Other Plays - Alan Sommerstein,Alan H. Sommerstein,Aeschylus
Medea and Other Plays - John Davie,Euripides,Richard Rutherford
The Oresteia: Agamemnon / The Libation Bearers / The Eumenides - William Bedell Stanford,Aeschylus,Robert Fagles

Having finished three underwhelming books in a row, I need something good.

 

While I will also pick up Woolf's A Room of One's Own (in celebration of having my flat back after the window-fitting has finished) and have high hopes for that one, I'm also hankering for some reads about Ancient Greece and Rome.

 

I'll leave it to your opinion whether this was inspired by starting to read Mary Beard's Confronting the Classics, but let's say that I've had a lot of fun spending time in Ancient Greece last August and have been wanting to embark on a similar project for some time. 

 

So, while I'm getting an introduction to the Classics provided by Mary Beard, I'll kick off the project on the Ides of March with a read of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar followed by as many of the listed titles I can get to all the way through April. 

And as many of these are also on my physical shelves, this should tie in nicely with my 2020 Mt. TBR Project.

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