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review 2018-05-22 20:57
Una bella introduzione :)
Archaeology: A Very Short Introduction - Paul G. Bahn

“You can release all kinds of demons lurking inside you when you are allowed to burn down a house, or attack a colleague with a bronze sword, bash hell out of a piece of stone, or smear cowdung over a wall or klin, and call it ‘Science’.”

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review 2018-04-03 22:05
A thrilling and fun adventure for lovers of Ancient Egypt and Indiana Jones
The Secret of the Lost Pharaoh - Carolyn Arnold

Thanks to the author’s publicist for offering me this opportunity to participate in the blog tour for the launch of this novel and for providing me an ARC copy that I freely chose to review.

I have read one of Carolyn Arnold’s Police Procedural books (Remnants, Brandon Fisher FBI Book 6) and when I was approached about this book, that is quite different in genre, I was very curious. I know I’m not the only reader fascinated by Ancient Egypt, Archaeology, and the secrets hidden by the pyramids and the hieroglyphs. I still have a copy of Gods, Graves and Scholars: The Story of Archaeology by C. W. Ceram (well, Dioses, Tumbas y Sabios, as I read the Spanish Translation), which I was given as a child, and I remember how much time I spent reading it and imagining that I was there, in Tutankhamen’s Tomb. Of course, the book is quite old now, and I was delighted to be given the opportunity of following an expedition in modern times, and seeing how much things have changed. But some things haven’t, and the magic and the excitement are still there.

This is book 2 in the Matthew Connor Adventure series, and although I can confirm it can be read independently, there are quite a few references to the previous book, City of Gold, so if you’re intending to read the whole series, I’d advise you to start by the first book, as you might otherwise miss some of the surprises. There is enough information about book 1 to get a good sense of the closeness between the friends, the dangers they encountered in their previous adventure, and also to understand what makes them tick.  But when it came to the intricacies of their personal lives, I was curious about how much background I had missed, because, in such matters, nuances are important.

The story is told in the third person from a variety of characters’ points of view. It is Matthew Connor Series, and he is one of the main characters, but the story starts with Alex, an Egyptologist who knew Matthew from before and who calls him when she realises what she has come across. Both of Matthew’s friends, Cal and Robin appear reluctant to join him at first, for different reasons, but they cannot resist the adventure, and they make a great team. Robin is the studious and organised one, and she’s always dreamed of Egypt. Cal is a photographer who loves adventure and is always trying to bring a light touch and a joke to the proceedings, and the fact that he is not knowledgeable about the topic offers the author the perfect excuse to explain the background, both historical and procedural, to their expedition. Matthew is an interesting mixture of intuition, deduction, and determination. He has great instincts even if sometimes he might get side-tracked by his emotions and his flirting with danger.  I know some readers are reluctant to read books where the point of view changes often, but it is well-done here, and it helps keep the mystery and the intrigue, as each character’s personality and insights provide us different clues to what is really going on. It is up to us to put the pieces of the puzzle together and it is great fun.

The book is fast-paced, and it will delight lovers of adventures. If you love Indiana Jones, you will be fascinated by the Emerald Tablets, the lost pharaoh, the snake whisperer, the treasure map, the betrayals, and the many secrets. In an ideal world, I would have loved to know more about the pharaoh and his secrets (he sounds like a fascinating character), and I was much more interested and convinced by the adventure aspect of the story than by the personal relationships and the love stories of the characters. Matthew came across as quite fickle at times, but he is very young (that is more evident emotionally than professionally), and I think his reactions and behaviour are understandable. The three friends go through emotional turmoil, and in all cases, it is related to their profession and their love of adventure, which brings an interesting and realistic aspect to the matter. We are used to adventurers who are either loners, or somehow come across a kindred spirit who loves adventures as much as they do, but rarely do we find a group of friends who know the value of their friendship and appreciate the difficulties of fitting their love for adventure into a ‘normal’ life. None of the main characters are flawless heroes (some hate snakes, there are jealousies, unfunny jokes, superstition, lack of commitment, and lies) and, for me, that is a strength, because it makes them human and easier to identify with.

The author once more shows her skill at research, and the technology used as part of the expedition, the procedures followed, and the setting blend smoothly into the story without delaying the action or going into unnecessarily detailed descriptions. There are clues, red herrings, plenty of suspects, and twists and turns to keep the mystery readers engaged too.

A thrilling and fun adventure that I recommend to anybody who loves the Indiana Jones movies and has always been intrigued by archaeological mysteries. The plot is particularly strong, but the characters are relatable and likeable, and I would love to join them on their next adventure. I am sure you will too.

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review 2018-01-22 06:50
The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World by Paul Jordan
The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World - Paul Jordan

TITLE: The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

 

AUTHOR:  Paul Jordan

 

DATE PUBLISHED: 2002

 

FORMAT: Paperback

 

ISBN-13: 978-0-582-77187-1

 

___________________

 

In this book, Paul Jordan takes a look at the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World:  how the list (or rather lists, since there were many) were compiled4, who compiled the lists (the Ancient Greeks), why specific wonders ended up on the lists, what the ancient wonders looked like since none exists in their original form and many of them have been destroyed, where they were located, and what eventually happened to them.  The book includes a map and illustrations.  I found this book to be generally interesting, but was disappointed by the chapter on the Egyptian Pyramids which was outdated (even at the time of going into press).  Jordan also discusses possible wonders from other civilizations that may (or may not) have made it onto such a list had the Ancient Greeks known about them.

 


Other relevant book:


Wonders of the Ancient World: Antiquity's Greatest Feats of Design and Engineering by Justin Pollard

 

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review 2017-01-01 15:40
Meet Me In Atlantis by Mark Adams
Meet Me in Atlantis: My Quest to Find the 2,500-Year-Old Sunken City - Mark Adams An interesting look at all the various hypotheses regarding the location of Atlantis. An interesting detective story.
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review 2016-11-20 16:57
DNF - After the Ice by Steven Mithen
After the Ice: A Global Human History 20,000-5000 BC - Steven Mithen

I picked up this book in the hopes of learning about what mischief humans got up to on all the continents after the ice age (20 000 BC) until the event of civilization (5000 BC) via archaeological, genetic and linguistic evidence.  Well, this book just didn't do it for me.  I read approximately half the book and had to stop.  Instead of a science/history book, the author wrote an annoying historical fiction novel with the odd bit of archaeological findings thrown in.  

The author has a habit of describing what he thinks life might be like at various places at various points in history, but he isn't always clear to differentiate between the information based on archaeological evidence and what is essentially the author's speculation.  In addition, the presence of an extremely annoying, silly and distracting fictional, time-travelling anthropologist ghost gimmick acting as eye-witness is included everywhere.  This fictional character was amusing int he first two chapters, but after that I kept hoping some neolithic shaman would exorcise him.

This annoying fictional character wonders around the prehistoric world in no particular order, other than dealing with each continent at a time.  This random wondering in time and space makes for jumbled and confusing reading, especially since no additional timeline diagram was provided.  In addition, many of the sites discussed in the book have similar findings and everything eventually blurres into one big smudge.  Pictures or diagrams would have been useful to differentiate these sites from one another.

In between the historical fiction accounts are jumbled-up, brief and rather vague archeological descriptions of selected sites, but genetic and linguistic evidence is mostly ignored, or currently outdated (the book was published in 2004).  

What facts I managed to pick out of what I read of this book were interesting, but the writing style was confusing, messy and after a while, rather boring.  I just couldn't keep my interest in this book going any further and decided to find something else to read.

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