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review 2017-11-24 17:49
Audio Review: Third Grave Dead Ahead (Charley Davidson #3) by Darynda Jones (Narrator: Lorelei King)
[ [ Third Grave Dead Ahead (Charley Davidson #NO. 3) - Greenlight ] ] By Jones, Darynda ( Author ) Jan - 2012 [ Compact Disc ] - Darynda Jones
Third Grave Dead Ahead

Charley Davidson #3
Darynda Jones (Narrator: Lorelei King)
Paranormal Romance - Urban Fantasy
Macmillan Audio
January 31st 2012
Audiobook
9 hours and 51 minutes
Library

 

Paranormal private eye. Grim reaper extraordinaire. Whatever. Charley Davidson is back in Darynda Jones' Third Grave Dead Ahead! And she's drinking copious amounts of caffeine to stay awake because, every time she closes her eyes, she sees him: Reyes Farrow, the parthuman, part-supermodel son of Satan. Yes, she did imprison him for all eternity, but come on. How is she supposed to solve a missing persons case, deal with an ego-driven doctor, calm her curmudgeonly dad, and take on a motorcycle gang hellbent on murder when the devil's son just won't give up?

 

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Many have recommend the Charley Davidson series to me and now I’ve finally picked it up. I’ve been really enjoying this series and how things are progressing. The series does need to be read or listened to in order. 

 

Third Grave Dead Ahead is full of mysteries, betrayals, heartache, and revelations. 

 

There is a lot going on in this installment; with three different mystery’s happening, understanding exactly what Charley can do, and Charley now trying to get in and out of the asylum without the biker club catching her.

 

The overall plot moved along well and now I know a bit more about Charley and her abilities, though we are not finished learning what she can do as the Grim Reaper. Their is much more to discover. I love the friendship Charley has with Cookie. Cookie is a great secondary character and just adds to the story. The witty humor continues to be fun, but at times if feel like Charley uses it to mask her stupid mistakes or maybe it’s her way of copping with a difficult and stressful situation. I do have to say I was rolling my eyes at some of the things Charley did in this one and I will point out that I didn’t care for how this one started, dream sex. Other then that I had fun and enjoyed the story and progress happening. 

 

Reyes of course plays a part in the story. He’s got his own agenda in Third Grave Dead Ahead and once Charley figures it out, it’s almost too late. Then to top it off she’s got her investigations and her family to deal with. She really hasn’t had it easy and dons’t have many people on her side. I was angry and sad for Charley. The men in her life really upset me. What Reyes and her father do, really made me sad. 

 

The Narrator, Lorelei King continues to make this series enjoyable. She does an outstanding job bringing Charley to life and all the characters. I continue to appreciate and like the audio version for this series. 

 

If you enjoy snarky humor and a good mystery then give the Charley Davidson series a try. I highly recommend the audio version for the series. 

 

Rated: 3.5 Stars

 

Was this review helpful? If so, please consider liking it on Goodreads (Angela)!

 

 

 

 

Challenge(s): Library Love | Pick Your Genre (PNR/UF) | Backlist Reader (2017)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was born and raised in Northern Indiana. I’m an outdoor sun loving reader living near San Fransisco. I’m a mother, wife, dog owner, animal, and book lover. I’m the owner, reviewer, and mind behind Angel’s Guilty Pleasures. My favorite animals are horses & dogs. As for reading I love all things paranormal & urban fantasy. My favorite shifters are dragons!

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Source: angelsguiltypleasures.com/2017/11/audio-review-third-grave-dead-ahead-charley-davidson-3-by-darynda-jones-narrator-lorelei-king
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review 2017-11-24 08:20
Fire Born (The Guardian #1) by Rayanne Haines
Fire Born - Rayanne Haines
Fire Born is the first book in The Guardian series, and we start off with Alex. She is just a normal girl, living a normal life - so of course you know that everything is about to explode into the unknown for her! And it does, but it brings with it a dragon Guardian, who is incredibly sexy! Collum is very old, and has his own opinions on how things should be. Alex throws numerous spanners in the works simply because she has her own opinions, and won't change them 'just because'.
 
This is an intricate story, guaranteed to keep your interest as you learn, along with Alex, just exactly how her life is about to change. The characters are all three-dimensional and have their own quirks. Mar is a fantastic character and I can't wait to read more about her. Alex and Collum have a HFN ending, with a promise from Collum. (Why can't I read his name without thinking of Golum instead?!?!?)
 
For a first book, there is enough world-building to satisfy, elemental thrills all the way through, and sexiness by the dozen. A very good start to a series, and I look forward to continuing with the story.
 
* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and my comments here are my honest opinion. *
 
Merissa
Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!
Source: sites.google.com/site/archaeolibrarian/merissa-reviews/fireborntheguardianseries1byrayannehaines
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review 2017-11-22 20:20
Surprisingly entertaining Canadian & Cree First Nations read about overcoming your past and owning your power.
Strangers - David Alexander Robertson

Disclaimers: I'm reviewing an uncorrected proof ebook version acquired via NetGalley, I'm choosing to leave an unbiased review, and I'm not qualified to comment in-depth on aboriginal representation.

 

More disclaimers: Um, so I just want to note for the record that I already named characters Cole and Ash in BLIND THE EYES before I read this book. No plagiarism. I guess Canadian authors just think alike? lol.

 

I loved this WAY more than I expected to. To get a few critiques out of the way, the cover looks a little off to me (more indie or MG maybe?), so I wasn't expecting a lot of polish. The first few pages are also a little disorienting, because the author launches with a different perspective from the main POV, incorporates supernatural elements immediately without explanation, and references past events without backstory at first. All of which turns out to be great in the scope of the story, but it feels like jumping in the deep end.

 

This is the story of a 17yo Cree First Nations teen who left his rural home community in elementary school and is attending high school in Winnipeg at the time the story opens. A supernatural being is trying to lure him back to his hometown. His aunt and grandmother don't want him to return for reasons that aren't explained at first, but we discover that there's past trauma and bullying to contend with. Cole also has some superior abilities that may be more than natural. There's a lot going on in the plot:

 

-trickster spirits, ghosts, unexplained supernatural/paranormal phenomena
-murder mystery/thriller
-romance? maybe?
-bullying, trauma & clinical anxiety (incl. struggles with medication)
-rural vs. city enmities/tension
-First Nations/aboriginal experience (on/off reserve, resourcing, discrimination)

 

As a Canadian, and as someone who actually lived in Winnipeg during her childhood, there was a lot that felt familiar in this, including issues raised that I'm not sure if a foreign reader would pick up on or not. The author (based on his Goodreads bio) does live in Winnipeg and is a member of a Cree First Nation, so this is an #ownvoices book with (to the best of my knowledge) good representation.

 

I liked how the struggles that First Nations people experience within Canadian society were included within the scope of the story, but that the focus was on the characters and their experiences. It can be hard to write good fiction that represents real-world issues without breaking character or bogging down/diverting the plot (see: preachy dystopias for one), so I thought Robertson did an excellent job of including accurate world-building in service of the story. For instance, there are medical emergencies in the scope of the story, and it's referenced a few times how help is requested but the government takes a long time to respond, ignores the pleas, or doesn't send the help needed in a timely manner. Remote communities struggle for resources and lose people to the cities where there's more opportunity, jobs etc.

 

Some Cree words are used (and translated in place), some ritual and beliefs are incorporated, but the narrative doesn't suffer at all from the exoticisation of aboriginal culture. (Though maybe American readers will feel like it's "exotic" Canadian culture?) If anything, the hockey-playing, tiny-remote-community, one-restaurant-in-town setting felt so recognizable to me that it would have been boring if not for the strong character writing and murdery-plot.

 

Cole and his friends are relatable as teenagers struggling with a variety of issues: tragic pasts, tension with childhood friendships left behind, current identity and past identity, sexual identity and relationships, trust issues with adults who're keeping secrets . . . Also, the writing of "Choch" the trickster-spirit was hilarious. That's probably what tipped this story from a good read to "when's the sequel coming out?" for me. His clowning felt instantly recognizable and, at times, laugh-out-loud hilarious. It was a great counterpoint to the dark thriller plot that could have headed into way more emo territory without him.

 

I'm totally down for reading a sequel/series about a Canadian First Nations teen with superpowers and his trickster spirit sidekick/tormenter/guide/whatever.

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review 2017-11-22 17:18
Infected: Epitath (Infected #8)
Infected: Epitaph - Andrea Speed

I should've just skipped to the last chapter to see if Roan got to retire and live, or if he was killed by his own pigheaded stupidity. 

He gets to live. And just move up to Canada and buy property up there without having to worry about immigration laws. What?

(spoiler show)

 

I admit, I was burnt out with this series by this book, and I did actually skip a lot of the "we're so macho because x,y,z" paragraphs that the characters like to ruminate over again and again and again. Yeah, we all got it the first time. You don't have to keep rubbing it in. It's as if Ms. Speed is afraid the readers would somehow forget basic information if she doesn't constantly remind us about it every other page, or like we won't know we're supposed to be impressed if she doesn't tell us how impressive they are all the time. (I'm not impressed; I'm bored now.)

 

And for the last book, we didn't really get to see much of the supporting characters as I'd hoped we would, though we do get to see them. And there's this weird detour to see Roan's friend from his teens who he hasn't thought of in years and we only heard about in passing once. And why?

Just to find out Collin named his son after Roan? Big whoop. What was the point? That's page time that could've been used for the characters we already know and actually care about.

(spoiler show)

 

I don't know. I'm not sold on the shifter genre at this point. THIRDS went downhill mega fast and I gave up on that one after the third book (how are there already ten of those things?) and this one just sort of petered out. Ms. Speed relied on cliches and stereotypes for much of her world-building, we never got any definitive details about this cat virus that infected people, and Roan's transforming abilities reached critical mass of ridiculousness a couple of books back.

 

Like I said in my review for the previous book, much of this felt like it was treading water, and I can't help but feel this series should've ended two or three books ago. It might have helped if she'd followed the traditional case-per-book narrative device - there's a reason it's so successful - instead of jamming two, three or even four cases into one book, none of them getting much attention and many of them going unsolved. It's admirable to want to show that yes, sometimes cases don't get solved, and yes, detectives and investigators often have more than one case going at a time, but she never quite settled into a cohesive way to handle all this juggling. The end result is that it all feels kind of random, and if she'd cut out even half of the "we're so awesome and crazy" self-congratualatory nonsense, she'd have had a lot more page time to dedicate to other things.

 

And I still don't buy Roan and Dylan as a couple. *shrug* Even the Scott and Holden stuff was boring by this book. 

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review 2017-11-22 16:30
Review: True Colors (Elder Races) by Thea Harrison
True Colors - Thea Harrison
True Colors

Elder Races #3.5
Thea Harrison
Paranormal Romance - Novella
Teddy Harrison LLC
July 11th 2017
eBook
80
Bought

 

This title was previously published and is being rereleased by the author. It has not been revised.

 

Meeting your soulmate? Great. Preventing your possible murder? Even better.

 

Alice Clark, a Wyr and schoolteacher, has had two friends murdered in as many days, and she’s just stumbled upon the body of a third. She arrives at the scene only minutes before Gideon Riehl, a detective in the Wyr Division of Violent Crime—and, as Alice inconveniently recognizes at first sight, her mate.

 

But the intense connection Riehl and Alice feel is further complicated when the murders are linked to a serial killer who last struck seven years ago, killing seven people in seven days. They have just one night before the killer strikes again.

 

And every sign points to Alice as the next victim.

 

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True Colors is #3.5 in the Elder Races series.

 

I’ve previously read True Colors when it first came out on 2011. It has been republished with a new cover, but the content is still the same.

 

I really like the Elder Races series and anything that is published I devour with great relish.

 

Ms. Harrsion has created a fun and unique world. With a verity of supernaturals. This novel is short, to the point, and gives you just a taste of what she has created. Their’s danger, romance, and passion. Both characters are likable. It’s an insta-love romance. They both know they are mates and so they hit it off right away. The murder mystery was nice, but wrapped up rather fast and without a big explosion.

 

I enjoyed this novel, but I wish their was more.

 

Rated: 3 Stars

 

Was this review helpful? If so, please consider liking it on Goodreads (Angela)!

 

 

Challenge(s): Pick Your Genre (PNR) (2017)

 

 

 

 

I was born and raised in Northern Indiana. I’m an outdoor sun loving reader living near San Fransisco. I’m a mother, wife, dog owner, animal, and book lover. I’m the owner, reviewer, and mind behind Angel’s Guilty Pleasures. My favorite animals are horses & dogs. As for reading I love all things paranormal & urban fantasy. My favorite shifters are dragons!

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