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review 2017-09-24 10:45
Tales of Men and Ghosts
Tales of Men and Ghosts - Edith Wharton

by Edith Wharton

 

Victorian-style literature takes a bit of patience to enjoy. It is written in a distinctively wordy style that I often enjoy, but can easily become tedious in some books.

 

Ghost stories were a holiday tradition in Victorian times and it seems some authors known for genres other than Horror lent their talents to this sub-genre, including Edith Wharton (who was born in the Victorian era, though this was released in 1910). The thing about these Victorian ghost stories is that they are seldom actually scary, but with a few exceptions, generally have an amenable ghost involved who behaves with Victorian manners and even becomes part of the family or just a minor irritation.

 

I can't say that Wharton's stories are the most stimulating that I've read. Some of the ten stories in this collection don't even have proper ghosts, but more a concept of ghostliness. One entitled The Eyes is the only one of the collection that I would describe as a proper ghost story, though that one was rather good.

 

Overall I wouldn't think of this collection first if I were going to recommend a book of Victorian ghost stories, but the one story justifies adding Edith Wharton to the list of women authors who can turn their hand to the spooky.

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review 2017-09-22 18:58
The New Reyes
The Trouble with Twelfth Grave - Darynda Jones

Reyes is not in good place, and he's not as was. Let's just say that he might be making Daddy proud. Charlie has this whole new title resting on her scared shoulders. Someone or something is killing gifted people and Charlie needs to find answers while protecting her friends and dealing with this not right Reyes. Life is messed up, but Charlie never stops looking for answers, and a distracting laugh. The ending, oh my, I cried. To do such a noble thing to be struck with such a cost, sorrow fell hard. My poor favorite characters, bruised but never beaten, I hope.

Ms. Jones, you are wickedly good at this. You took my heart through the shadows, through the rubble, into the struggle for good/evil, life/death, love/faith, and then threw me into a dark ravine with no bottom in sight. I loved it, couldn't get enough, and want more pain and laughs.
if you love snark, romance, action, love and coffee read this series.

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review 2017-09-21 17:02
The Specter of the Indian: Race, Gender, and Ghosts in American Seances, 1848-1890 (Hardcover) by Kathryn Troy
The Specter of the Indian: Race, Gender, and Ghosts in American Seances, 1848-1890 - Kathryn Troy

I am thrilled someone has finally decided to explore the Native American side of the United States story. This is the spectral side of their story. The Indians had a hard way of life even before the White Man came along and tossed them off their lands and took away not only their livelihood but also their lives. In this book we get to explore how after death the Native's let their thoughts and feelings be known to early spiritualists. Native's have always believed in the spiritual side of life. This book will show you they were right. If you believe.

 

Kathryn Troy has done an outstanding job with this book. I was so into this book I couldn't put it down. This book gives you so much history, so much research, and so many point based facts. It is not over the top mind blowing though. She has written it all out with the perfect amount of information that it does not bog your brain down. The research she has done must have been astronomical. Everything in the book is backed up with documentation so you know this is not just her opinion of the facts. I love how she takes you back in time to the seance as it is happening. She lays it all out for you to the point your mind will actually take you the seance. You can feel the power around you.

 

I was given a copy of this book to read by the author for review.

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review 2017-09-21 05:49
Weaker than predecessors
Just After Sunset: Stories - Stephen King

A weaker read for me than his other short-story collections on the whole. N. is spectacular, though.

 

Willa: OK, sentimental ghost story

The Gingerbread Girl: Good thriller

Harvey's Dream: Now we are talking. For extra kick, which one?

Rest Stop: Awesomesauce!

Stationary Bike: If not writing, then images. And addictions. I love how he has his "go to" obsessive mind-itches that he always comes back to write about.

The things they left behind: I liked bits and pieces *shrug* I tend to avoid lit on the topic

Graduation Afternoon: Vignette building for that last snapshot. Meh

N. : This one was freaky scary. Likely because we all are little OCD. Best one in the book.

The Cat from Hell: Liked this one, and that gruesome end!

The New York Times at special bargain rates: Liked the idea. Sweet and sad.

Mute: I found this one funny in a bewildering way.

Ayana: People passing it on. A lovely concept. 

A very tight place: It was good. And gross (so very gross). And good.

 

 

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text 2017-09-20 10:37
Changed selection for Terrifying Women square: I've read 6%.
Tales of Men and Ghosts - Edith Wharton

I had another book picked out for this square about a scary circus, but it reached DNF by page 2. Not only was the story promising to be crap, but the author called circus people carnies, which is a cardinal sin with me. Do some research! Don't write in a setting if you can't be bothered to learn something about it. Circuses are not carnivals and carnivals don't have big tops. What's so hard?

 

 

Anyway, I decided to select another book for the square. At first I thought I might peruse through my folder of Horror stories looking for women authors, but there were rather a lot of male authors so I took another tack. I Googled women Horror authors.

 

This of course took me to Classic authors like Mary Shelly, but it also revealed that some Classic women authors known for other genres have also written Horror stories! This includes Louisa May Alcott and Edith Wharton.

 

So, I now have The Abbot's Ghost, or Maurice

Treherne's Temptation: A Christmas Story by Alcott on my computer, ready to transfer to Kindle.

 

However, I wasn't on computer at the time and could get Edith Wharton's ghost stories for free from Amazon, so that's the one I'm reading for the square. I do love a Victorian ghost story.

 

 

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