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Search tags: Gustave-Flaubert
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photo 2017-05-08 11:22

Wings -- a quote from Gustave Flaubert, who died today, May 8, 1880

Source: nednote.com
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review 2016-11-29 04:31
Niczego bardziej nie pragnęła, jak oprzeć się na czymś pewniejszym niż miłość.
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review 2016-10-29 04:31
Madame Bovary ★★★★★
Madame Bovary - Eleanor Aveling,Gustave Flaubert

Monstrously selfish woman damages everything of value in her life and everyone who loves her. I found it surprisingly modern and easy to read - I practically zoomed through it. The writing is delicious and the humor is wicked. I'm only sorry that it took me so long to get around to reading it. 

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text 2016-10-27 12:43
Madame Bovary - progress 47%.
Madame Bovary - Eleanor Aveling,Gustave Flaubert

I expected to be bored silly, but have really been enjoying this story. The writing is much more... modern, I guess, than I expected it to be, although I am having to stop and check some unfamiliar words or references that are either specific to the setting (France) or the time (mid1800s). We're really just getting to the juicy parts, though. 

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2016-07-19 00:00
Madame Bovary
Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert,Eleanor Marx Aveling I understand why this book was so scandalous at the time it came out. It dared to voice the fears of many women at the time (I would go so far as to say the majority of poor and working class women). Emma, while not a likable character, was trapped by society's expectations, which to some extent makes her sympathetic.

She thought she wanted to be married based on what society dictated a gently bred girl should do. The reality of her married life made me think of a line from Thomas Hardy's [b:Far from the Madding Crowd|31463|Far from the Madding Crowd |Thomas Hardy|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1388279695s/31463.jpg|914540], when Gabriel Oak initially tries to convince Bathsheba Everdene to marry him. He described what their married life would be like thusly: "And at home by the fire, whenever you look up, there I shall be—and whenever I look up there will be you." I remember reading that line and being horrified by the prospect. Sadly that was likely what the reality of married life was for the majority of women. Yes, Charles was a good, decent, hardworking, honorable man who adored Emma. But unless a woman is head over heels in love with her husband (and I imagine it helps if she's a little short on intelligence and imagination), such a life would be unbearable! Thank God society has changed.

And really, it all boils down to the fact that Emma just didn't want to be married. She wanted romance and passion. While her husband was very much in love with her, he was quite incapable of the sort of passion she craved. When someone else offered it, she was all too willing to allow herself to be seduced. Obviously, such behavior was totally unacceptable at the time. Even by today's standards, there are a myriad of unflattering appellations which would be used on a woman like that. Easy, slut and loose are just a few of the less offensive ones. Oops! Did I say society had changed? Obviously, not as much as we would think. Women are still judged more harshly than men.
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