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text 2019-03-10 18:41
Reading progress update: I've read 45%.
Kronos Rising: After 65 million years, the world's greatest predator is back. (Volume 1) - Max Hawthorne

There's way too much wrong with this book. Formatting and editing issues. Constantly having flashbacks. And just now we not only had a flashback but it was in the middle of a scene and it just appeared like a brand new chapter. A few pages of nothing important and then back to the main story. I'm bored as hell with this. Skip.

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text 2019-03-06 00:30
Reading progress update: I've read 34%.
Kronos Rising: After 65 million years, the world's greatest predator is back. (Volume 1) - Max Hawthorne

The formatting on this book has moments of bizarre. There are randomly italicized letters and words. Mostly the O in "of" so that the word keeps looking like of. Over and over.

 

But at least we are finally Kronosauring. Although I have serious questions about the size of the reptile. A Mosasaur is much bigger, but the krono in here is described as almost as big as Blue Whale, the largest animal to ever live. So I'm really confused. Maybe this is like a giant or something?

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text 2019-03-03 19:43
Reading progress update: I've read 22%.
Kronos Rising: After 65 million years, the world's greatest predator is back. (Volume 1) - Max Hawthorne

We're spending more time in flashbacks than on the present plot. If these people spend this much time in the past, they have issues.

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review 2019-02-10 18:40
Another fantastic issue
Superior Spider-Man (2018-) #2 - Christos Gage,Mike Hawthorne,Travis Charest

I wasn't 100% sure about this series, but I liked the concept enough of having Doc Ock as the Spider-Man to subscribe to this series. 

 

Given what happened with him, and his girlfriend Anna, I understand why she wouldn't want to be involved with him, and why she's so unhappy with his new deception.   And so it might make sense to keep her out of this, but it's delicious to watch her struggle with the implications of having a new, cloned Otto Octavius - living under a new name - and her knowledge of who he is.   Is he going to prove that he wants to do good to her?   I think he already is, and this makes her secret knowledge that much more of a cross to bear. 

 

And yet, as sucky as it is for her, it's damn good drama.   It's handled deftly and I'm glad the author found a good way to bring her back into the fold. 

 

The art is pretty fabulous, but it's not different enough to be a favorite.   Phil Noto, Alex Maleev, and others have a painterly, or different style, that make them stand out as top tier favorites.   While this art is spectacular, it looks very same-y to many other comics. Gorgeous, and I can tell many artists apart from decades of reading comics, but I think this would blend into the general 'standard comic style' for novices.   (And yes, I've been told that all comic book art looks the same to novices, who struggle with the fact that details differentiate.)

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review 2019-01-17 16:30
The House of the Seven Gables (Hawthorne)
The House of the Seven Gables - Nathaniel Hawthorne

Somehow I missed this during my omnivorous reading of the 19th century gothic in my undergraduate years. I read it now from the point of view of someone who distinctly resembles fractious, unsightly Hepzibah far more than the idealized "little woman" Phoebe (though perhaps I have always been more a Hepzibah than a Phoebe). In any case, the emphasis on Hepzibah's incapabilities and infirmities, and her constant scowl, was the one truly uncomfortable note for me in this otherwise delightful excursion into Hawthorne's extravagant and oratorical chessboard of symbols and motifs. I'm aware that Hepzibah's offputting scowl, which does not at all represent her actual mood or actual morals, is the counterpart of the Judge's false and beaming smile, and both are equally insisted upon beyond any reasonable requirement for description so as to force the careless reader to consider what they actually represent. But I must admit, at the umpteenth reference to the ugly Hepzibah scowl, I was provoked into growling, "oh just give it a rest, already, Nathaniel!" Subtlety - not his forte.

 

Chapter 18 is extraordinary writing. I started reading it in a slightly irritated mood, because it seemed that the author was going to take a simplistic trope (the narrator doesn't realize that Judge Pyncheon is dead) and just make a chapter out of it without doing much. Instead, it becomes an absolute symphony of rhetorical, imaginative expansion of the would-haves and could-haves surrounding the mundane fact of a nasty man dead of congenital heart failure in a decaying old house.

 

I have a very small and select folder on my Kindle called, "read but keeping". In goes The House of Seven Gables.

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