logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: InD\'tale
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
review 2021-09-08 00:00
The Raven's Tale
The Raven's Tale - Cat Winters The Raven's Tale - Cat Winters I just started reading this without having any idea what it was really about and I was clueless of what was going on for awhile. The story follows Edgar Allen Poe's real life around his late adolescence and early adulthood. The author added the real characters, places and events from his life. So this story is somewhat biographical but a fantasy at the same time. Poe's muse is gothic creature trying to help him find his true self as a poet while is adopted father is trying to do anything to keep him from it. Some poetry is woven in the story. The author does a great job of giving that Poe feeling. I enjoyed this.
Like Reblog Comment
text 2020-10-29 16:12
Somewhere in Time by Fizza Younis

 

 
Title: Somewhere in Time

Author: Fizza Younis

Release Date: 31st Oct, 2020

Available for Pre-Order: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08L9NTQ8K

Add to Goodreads Shelf: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/55709081-somewhere-in-time

Bookbub link: https://www.bookbub.com/books/somewhere-in-time-by-fizza-younis

Synopsis

When one was dead and the other slumbered in peace...

Would the two ever meet?

 

Somewhere in Time is a retelling of the classic fairy tale, Sleeping Beauty. The story is set between the twentieth and the twenty-first century. With a much darker paranormal twist and no happily ever-after within sight, it follows the journey of our beloved characters; Aurora and Prince Phillip. What the future holds for them is yet to be determined, so read on to find out how their story unfolds this time around.

 

 

 

 

 

Source: bookseaterme.blogspot.com/2020/10/coming-soon-somewhere-in-time-by-fizza.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2020-09-01 12:51
Political relativism on the highest level
Nostromo: A Tale of the Seaboard - Veronique Pauly (Editor), J. H. Stape (Editor),Joseph Conrad

Why did it take me so long to finish Nostromo? First of all, life. I don’t know about you guys and girls, but my past weeks, even months were busy and crazy af. Secondly, for various reasons, 6 other books squeezed themselves in between since I started Nostromo in April, which – in hindsight – was not helping the reading experience, because this is a very complex novel.
Therefore the already confusing political circumstances became even more confusing for me, because after a long break from Nostromo, during which I might have read two or three different books, I often forgot or confused some of the characters and hence was a bit lost plotwise. But hey, that’s what times filled with revolutions and counter-revolutions are all about – chaos and confusion. So in this regard, I guess I got the full experience.

Nostromo is set in Costaguana, a fictitious republic somewhere in South America. The novel moves quite slowly at the beginning, so initially you have a lot of time to get acquainted with the main characters, the setting and some early events along the storyline. The slow pace is a good thing though, because honestly this novel takes some time to get used to, but the more I progressed, the more it grew on me. With the exception of the last few chapters which are slower again, Conrad really picks up the speed in approximately the last third of his novel – stuff is happening left, right and centre, the perspective is shifting within the chapters, time jumps back and forth and as mentioned before, after taking a long break and reading something else in between, I admit that I struggled quite a bit to pick up where I left, but there is only myself to blame for that.

This is a very political and very complex novel (well, it is written by Conrad after all) about revolutions, counter-revolutions, political scheming, speculation, exploitation, colonization, morals, individual monomaniacal ideas, and everything in between. Even if you read Nostromo without taking crazy long breaks, it is easy to loose focus and I somehow have the feeling that even Conrad himself was on the verge of getting lost in the events of his own novel from time to time.

Somehow Nostromo reminded me a lot of For Whom the Bell Tolls, especially regarding the South American way of revolting and not really caring at the same time. Yet the political relativism expressed by Conrad surpasses Hemingway by miles! Conrad challenges the whole notion of linear historical progress by presenting a cyclical repetition of events that ultimately renders every decision and action basically irrelevant. One of my favourite sentences from the novel’s preface, that sums up this point really well, is: „Nostromo’s narrative structure generates a similar chaos by blurring cause and effect.“ I couldn’t have said it any better.

As I mentioned in one of my first Nostromo posts, the character Nostromo appears very scarcely (similar to Quasimodo in The Hunchback of Notre Dame), even though there is a sheer mountain of  secondary literature dealing solely with Nostromo, his motives and/or his psychology. Personally, I didn’t much care for him, and neither did Conrad apparently (as expressed in one of his letters): „I don’t defend Nostromo himself. Fact is he does not take my fancy either.“

One more thing editing-wise. The editor added quite a number of notes and annotations to the text, most of which is helpful background info about historical events, literary sources or just a general help for some of the strange sounding expressions for which Conrad used a one-to-one translation of a Gallicism into English. But if I ever meet the editor (which is highly unlikely), I will personally punch her in the face for one of the notes in which she completely spoilers the death of a character without any warning! This particular character just got introduced in the very chapter in which said annotation is placed and it happens to be the one character I immediately fell in love with and really cared about.

But to finally wrap this up: the 3,5 out of 5 stars reflect my personal reading experience (which was a rather rugged one) rather than the actual quality of Nostromo. Because to do such a novel justice, I would have to re-read while being more focused which I will do at some point in the future.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2020-08-29 15:08
The Terrifying Tales by Edgar Allen Poe
Terrifying Tales: Tell Tale Heart; The Cask of the Amontillado; The Masque of the Red Death; The Fall of the House of Usher; The Purloined Letter; The Pit and the Pendulum - Edgar Allan Poe

Let me break down each tale, by telling you which ones I loved and which I did not.
I loved The Tell-Tale Heart. This is a story of how your own conscience can betray you and give you up. I also really enjoyed The Murders In The Rue Morgue. It was an interesting whodunnit with an unexpected outcome.
I did not like The Cask of Amontillado. It was just confusing and I don't get it at all.
I also did not like The Masque of the Red Death. I tell you this, the story made me never want to go to a ball and engage in revelry. Thankfully, I don't see any balls in my future. The rest of the stories were decent. And all-in-all I am glad I read some Poe. Another great classic writer that I can add to my read list!

 

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2020/08/the-terrifying-tales-by-edgar-allen-poe.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2020-06-12 09:48
Curvy and the Canid: A Wolf Shifter Fairy Tale Retelling by Ruby Sirois
Curvy and the Canid: A Wolf Shifter Fairy Tale Retelling - Ruby Sirois

@Archaeolibrary, #Adult#Paranormal#Romance#Mythology#Norse#FairyTaleRetelling 4 out of 5 (very good)

 

Curvy and the Canid is a wolf shifter story set in Sweden involving the Norse gods. From that alone, I wanted to read this story!

Told from multiple points of view and in the present tense, this story explains about Saskia and Einar. She is a BBW in a country where most are 'skinny-minnies' (big generalisation there from me). She is successful in her chosen career but lacks the confidence to go it alone as an artist. Einar is the Missing Duke and we find out his story too. Together, these two have to overcome a curse and prove that true love can heal all wounds.

This is only a novella and yet it packs a punch. I'm not too keen on novellas as I prefer my stories to have a bit more to them. However, I have to say, with this one, the story is all there! There is nothing missing from this tale and each character is fully developed. You get the side characters who obviously aren't as big as the main ones but they are still three-dimensional.

I loved the setting for this story and can only hope we see more of this setting in future books. Einar and Saskia make a great couple, good for each other in so many ways. With sexy times and lots of love, this was a brilliant story and I can't wait to read more.

* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and the comments here are my honest opinion. *

Merissa
Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!

Source: archaeolibrarian.wixsite.com/website/post/curvy-and-the-canid-a-wolf-shifter-fairy-tale-retelling-by-ruby-sirois
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?