logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Life
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-20 19:12
*pleased sigh*
The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate - Jacqueline Kelly

How could I have neglected this book so long! I have found me a new all time favourite. You have no idea how lucky you are that most of the time I was too entertained to post. I have saved quotes at the rate of one-a-chapter, and I was trying to be conservative.

 

I read, and I kept researching things mentioned, from taxonomy to music or history, and having a blast through-out. I couldn't stop laughing, even during the turkey debacle (there was something inherently funny in that tragedy of childhood).

 

“Why do you want a donkey?” said Harry.
“Because I don’t think people eat donkeys. Do they?”

 

The thought that I have to get my mom to read this poped continously too. Mom is a school librarian, and has a project going where she narrates to the kids in a bi-weekly basis. Lending is at an all-time hight since it started. They discuss a lot of what she reads them in a free way, and they come up with the most interesting questions and observations. They also end up researching a lot on their own, (or plain finish the book in a weekend) since there's no obligation *snickers*. Now imagine what this book could spawn. I pestered her on the phone the whole morning (whenever I surfaced from the pages, that is).

 

There are some narrow anachronisms in general, and I reckon there must be more in particular for the region, since the author apologises in the note at the end. But really? Like one can place every bit acuratedly on ones own timeline. And no child is that aware of herself and her place in the world (hell, most adults aren't that awere of themselves), but while many observations might be too clearly worded, they still ring true to some memories of childhood impressions. Children instincts are an uncanny thing.

 

So, is it imperfect? I really couldn't tell you, since after reading six glorious months on the life of this child, my only true complain is that I wanted more when I got to the end. More pages, more time with her, more of and for her future.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-20 18:25
BOY'S LIFE Review
Boy's Life - Robert R. McCammon

Why did I put this one off for so long? Why, why, why?

 

Brilliant. Simply brilliant. Certainly one of the finest novels about the magic of childhood that I've ever read — and probably the most realistic, at least based on my childhood experiences. Maybe it's because I, like the protagonist of this novel (and Robert McCammon himself), grew up in Alabama. Boy's Life is spot-on, and I felt like a child once more while untangling the mystery of the strange murder in Zephyr.

 

Not much I can say about this one, except it's just friggin' wonderful. I only wish it were longer. Thank you, Mr. McCammon, for reminding me that magic does exist.

 

“You know, I do believe in magic. I was born and raised in a magic time, in a magic town, among magicians. Oh, most everybody else didn’t realize we lived in that web of magic, connected by silver filaments of chance and circumstance. But I knew it all along. When I was twelve years old, the world was my magic lantern, and by its green spirit glow I saw the past, the present and into the future. You probably did too; you just don’t recall it. See, this is my opinion: we all start out knowing magic. We are born with whirlwinds, forest fires, and comets inside us. We are born able to sing to birds and read the clouds and see our destiny in grains of sand. But then we get the magic educated right out of our souls. We get it churched out, spanked out, washed out, and combed out. We get put on the straight and narrow and told to be responsible. Told to act our age. Told to grow up, for God’s sake. And you know why we were told that? Because the people doing the telling were afraid of our wildness and youth, and because the magic we knew made them ashamed and sad of what they’d allowed to wither in themselves."

Like Reblog Comment
text 2017-04-20 14:17
Life of Pi - Yann Martel

shreya khubber(9th) mind tree

An inspirational guide to all those who want to learn the art of survival and hope. the book is an insight to the life of pi patel, a tamil boy who survives a shipwreck in the pacific ocean with his skills ,faith and spirituality. It engages the reader through its spectacular description of the adventures of pi and his only companion, a tiger called Richard Parker. A must read for all the adventure lovers!

Like Reblog Comment
photo 2017-04-20 07:49
wu-wei-zen-poem-from-tree-of-life-spiritual-poetry-book-by-natasa-pantovic-nuit
Tree of Life - Nataša Pantović Nuit

Wu Wei zen poem from tree of life spiritual poetry book by Natasa Pantovic Nuit

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-18 06:13
Still Life with Tornado
Still Life with Tornado - A.S. King

It has been a long time since I really connected to a book so strongly and so quickly. This book has a delightful amount of magical realism but still has such a real and raw feeling to it that I could really related to and I could see 16 year old me in 16 year old Sarah, I can see my family in Sarah's family. I love the way King slowly brings us in and reveals the layers of the story. I went into this book really blind and I think that maybe the best way to read King's work.  I'm excited to pick up more from her, and I'm so glad that I can finally mark her off of my Authors to read list. 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?