logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Martin-Luther-King-Jr
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-02-23 20:21
Martin's Big Words: The Life of Martin Luther King Jr.
Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. - Doreen Rappaport,Bryan Collier

Martin's Big Words: The Life of Martin Luther King Jr. by Doreen Rappaport is a great rendition of the history of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This book does an excellent job of explaining historical events and facts of the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King's influence during that time. This book is appropriate for young readers and uses developmentally appropriate language. The illustrations are exceptional. Without too many words and with just enough detail, readers can learn about the life and death of Dr. King as well as the start and end of the Civil Rights Movement.

 

This book serves a great educational purpose in the classroom. After a lesson on Dr. King's influence during the Civil Rights Movement, I would read this book to the class and discuss it afterwards. Then I would ask students to read portions of the famous "I Have a Dream Speech" by Dr. King and to find real word examples of how his dream came true. Then, I would ask students to help write a class "We Have a Dream Too" speech where we would write dreams or wishes we have for the world as it is today (and the issues Americans face today).

 

 

Guided Reading: S
Lexile: 410L
Accelerated Reader Level: 3.4

 
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-02-01 16:26
January Reading
Jane, Unlimited - Kristin Cashore
My Conversations with Canadians - Lee Maracle
Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story - Martin Luther King Jr.
Swallowing Mercury - Wioletta Greg,Wioletta Grzegorzewska,Eliza Marciniak
 Atomic Adventures: Secret Islands, Forgotten N-Rays, and Isotopic Murder - A Journey into the Wild World of Nuclear Science - James Mahaffey,Keith Sellon-Wright
Sweet Disorder - Rose Lerner
The Bear and the Nightingale: A Novel - Katherine Arden
The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner - Daniel Ellsberg
Winter Rose - Patricia A. McKillip
A Wizard of Earthsea - Ursula K. Le Guin

Eleven books read:

Jane, Unlimited - Kristin Cashore

My Conversations with Canadians - Lee Maracle  

Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story - Martin Luther King Jr.  

Swallowing Mercury - Wioletta Greg, Eliza Marciniak  

Atomic Adventures: Secret Islands, Forgotten N-Rays, and Isotopic Murder - James Mahaffey

Someone To Love - Mary Balogh (DNF)

Sweet Disorder - Rose Lerner  

The Bear and the Nightingale - Katherine Arden 

The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner - Daniel Ellsberg  

Winter Rose - Patricia A. McKillip  

A Wizard of Earthsea - Ursula K. Le Guin  

 

Women Writers Bingo: 3/25

(Personal take: Finish 25 books by new-to-me female authors in 2018*)

Finished in January: Wioletta Greg, Rose Lerner, Katherine Arden

 

Gender Balance:

Fiction: 7 by women, 0 by men, 0 by non-binary

Non fiction: 1 by women, 3 by men, 0 by non-binary

 

Format:

Paper books that I own: 0

Paper books from library: 5

E-books that I own: 1

E-books from library: 1

Audiobooks that I own: 4

 

February Goals:

1. Finish reading for Hugo Award nominations (Jade City, Prey of the Gods, Winter Tide).

2. Read at least one book for black history month

3. Stop ordering fucking library books.

 

 

*Women Writers Bingo Bonus Points:

5 of those books in translation: 1/5 (Swallowing Mercury)

5 of those books are non-fiction: 0/5

 

Bingo Companion Round:

5 books by non-binary authors: 0/5

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-07 15:54
More interesting for tone than content.
Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story - Martin Luther King Jr.

There are probably better books about the Montgomery Bus Boycott and that year in civil rights, there are certainly better books about Dr. King himself. This one is long on polemics, and short on logistical details an personalities involved.

 

However, what made this book absolutely fascinating to me was the way that Dr. King was positioning it and himself in the political dialogue at the time. The introduction indicates that some of that was to do with editorial guidance from the publisher, such as the frequent "I'm defiantly not a communist!" comments when he's talking about his political background. More of the book is Dr. King himself selling his movement and non-violence and the SCLC to the general public, and you can watch him choosing what incidents and comments to include, what to deal with frankly, what to elide. the last hour and a bit of the audiobook was suggestions for where to go after bus integration, and you can see him lining voting rights in his sights.

 

If he were writing today, I think it would be a very different book, because he would be arguing to a different popular opinion, though of course it would still be filled with the same integrity and pride as this book, and hopefully also with the same victory. It made me very interested in other accounts of the boycott, and in King's later books.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
quote 2017-08-06 19:50
Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.

—Martin Luther King Jr.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-10-28 15:50
Why We Can't Wait - Martin Luther King Jr.
Why We Can't Wait - Martin Luther King Jr.,Jesse Jackson

“No person has the right to rain on your dreams.”

“Science investigates; religion interprets. Science gives man knowledge, which is power; religion gives man wisdom, which is control. Science deals mainly with facts; religion deals mainly with values. The two are not rivals.”

“In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.”

And the famous......

“I Had a Dream....”

And can never forget.....

"Free at last, free at last, thank God Almighty we are free at last."

If you don't know the voice to these quotes then you need to either go back to school or locate your library as quick as you can. The visionist who, with courage, spoke these words to the ears of every person on the planet. Martin Luther King Jr. Martin Luther King Jr. as you know is well known for his speaking for civil rights movement in the time when folks didn't "get along well with other" because of the skin color. Back in the day it was unheard of for White folk and Black folks could be seen together in a public place; for them to sit casually in a resturant and just eat breakfast. Today...we hardly ever have this problem. Kids in school can understand what their teachers mean by "segregated" "racial differences". To fully understand what really happened back in the day, what took place and how the "people" felt it's always best to go to a non-fiction book. And I, as your librarian, have the perfect book for the young minds that are trying to understand who, what, where when and the why. Why We Can't Wait by the man himself, Martin Luther King Jr.

Why We Can't Wait talks about the Birmingham, Alabama (which was well known as the most racially segregated city in the United States at that time) druing the 1963 which was a very crucial year for the civil rights movement. King demonstrated with many other outspoken people to the world the power of nonviolent direct action by examining the history of the civil rights struggle and the tasks that furture generations (like us) must accomplish to bring about full equality.

The other reason why this book is perfect for young minds trying to understand what went on during that time frame is that Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote most of this book was written along with a "Letter from Birmingham Jail" King wrote in April of 1963. Trying to get inside the mind of one of the great outspoken leaders of our time? Try your local library and ask about Martin Luther King Jr. You might find something you weren't even looking for!!!

Source: www.goodreads.com/review/show/513100149
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?